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How to get to called Old Aurora - New Orleans (Louisiana) Hotel called Old Aurora - New Orleans (Louisiana)

Photos of called Old Aurora - New Orleans, Louisiana

photos found. 3096. Photos on the current page: 15
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Mississippi River sunset
Mississippi River sunset
  • Author: hudson Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-03 20:07:49
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'13"N - 90°0'1"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Memphis and New Orleans
Memphis and New Orleans
  • Author: Typhoon Lagoon Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-05-11 19:44:45
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°55'41"N - 89°59'2"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel called Old Aurora - New Orleans
94. Revolutionary war battlefield, New Orleans, LA
94. Revolutionary war battlefield, New Orleans, LA
  • Author: rcribb1 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-04-16 14:43:07
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'26"N - 89°59'42"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
95. Revolutionary war battlefield, New Orleans, LA
95. Revolutionary war battlefield, New Orleans, LA
  • Author: rcribb1 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-04-16 14:51:28
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'31"N - 89°59'39"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
DSC00136.jpg
DSC00136.jpg
  • Author: THM91 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-05-21 14:45:23
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'21"N - 89°59'39"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Fallen
The Fallen
  • Author: map.hiker Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2006-11-19 16:01:50
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'19"N - 89°59'21"W
  • Chalmette National Battlefield
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Working River
Working River
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 10:53:05
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'22"N - 89°59'38"W
  • The Mighty Mississippi River, as seen from the dock at the Chalmette Battlefield where the Creole Queen had parked. This is looking downtream, in that zone where the river barges mix with the big sea freighters, and it's probably stressful as Hell for anybody driving anything on the water. There's a freighter port on either side of the battlefield, and several of the big ships passed while we were there, but they timed themselves so that none of them passed when we were on the levy, so I can't do that thing where I take a picture of a ship and track where it is now. I could track that tug, I suppose, but that's obviously a harbor tug moving barges around the local pilings, so it probably doesn't go anywhere other than where it is.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
River Side
River Side
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 10:57:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'24"N - 89°59'40"W
  • Another view of the Malus-Beauregard House, seen from the top of the levy separating the Chalmette Battlefield from the Mississippi River. The Beauregard part of the house's name comes its second owner, Judge Rene Beauregard, who bought the house in 1880. Rene Beauregard was best known for being the oldest son of the famous Confederate general, Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard. That's too many names for a Confederate to keep track of, so he's listed in all the history books as P.G.T. Beauregard, which is still a lot of unnecessary letters. General P.G.T. Beauregard commanded the Confederate defenses at Fort Sumter and led the Confederates to victory at First Manassas. (Since I'm talking about Beauregard, I'll use the Confederate name for that battle.) He later fought in the Western Theater at places like Shiloh and Corinth.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Chalmette National Cemetery
Chalmette National Cemetery
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 11:30:54
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'31"N - 89°59'17"W
  • In a counter-intuitive bit of geomorphology, land right along a river like the Mississippi tends to be higher than land farther from the river's edge. Oddly, this owes to flooding, though it makes sense if you think about it. Whenever a river floods, it dumps a lot of sediment on the flood plain. The land right next to the river floods the most often, so it gets the most sediment dumped on it. Over time, this sediment builds up into natural levies. All the original parts of New Orleans and the surrounding region were built on the Mississippi's natural levy, including the old plantations than ran along the river into what is now St. Bernard Parish. After the Civil War when the government was looking for an easy place in Louisiana to bury people, it logically picked out a spot on the natural levy where the water table was farther underground, and they didn't have to worry so much about a bunch of graves washing away. It helped for the marketing that this spot was right next to the battle site from the Battle of New Orleans. The Chalmette National Cemetery was established in 1864, and it houses the graves of more than 15,000 soldiers from the Civil War on up to Vietnam. It is now closed to new burials.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Swallowed
Swallowed
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 11:31:31
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'30"N - 89°59'18"W
  • The Chalmette National Cemetery has been here a long time. Long enough for big trees to have swallowed up several of the graves and their markers. You can just see a marble stone poking between the roots that ate it. Considering the spacing of the markers, there is at least one more marker and possibly two fully inside the tree. Someday, this tree will die, which makes me wonder how the people who manage the cemetery will tackle the issue of the markers. Will they remember that they're in there and carve up the stump to extract them, or will they just leave the stump to rot away, revealing the markers over time? Or has the tree pushed the markers underground, so that they'll be forever buried? I often dream of having a time machine, but I'd use it in boring ways. One thing I'd do is jump ahead about 200 years to see what happened to these grave markers.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fazendeville
Fazendeville
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 11:19:26
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'24"N - 89°59'32"W
  • In 1857, another portion of the old Chalmette Plantation next to the Malus-Beauregard property was granted as an inheritance to a New Orleans grocer named Jean Pierre Fazende, who the records list as a "free man of color." When the Civil War ended, Fazende subdivided his property into a bunch of little lots he sold to newly freed slaves, and a little community grew up called Fazendeville. The little town would eventually come to be home to about 200 descendants of slaves, and would last well into the 20th century. Fazendeville had everything a town needed: a couple of general stores, a little one-room schoolhouse, a church, and a bunch of nice little homes, all sitting on the high ridge formed next to the river and further protected from flooding by the big levy the Corps of Engineers built in the early 20th century. But then in the 1960s, the National Park Service came along with a plan to turn as much of the old Chalmette Plantation as it could into a national historical park. There was a contentious battle with the Fazendevillians, who were happy with their little patch of land right next to the levy, and they didn't want to sell. But the government always wins these fights, especially against poor people. (This isn't even just a race thing. See: Great Smoky Mountains, Shenandoah, Mammoth Cave, Land Between the Lakes, etc.) In 1966, the Fazendevillians were forced out, and the little town was demolished. Most of the people who lived in Fazendeville wound up moving a mile or so upriver to the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans. And we know what happened there. Now, I want to be clear, I am a supporter (in general) of a strong federal government, and I'm a big fan of that government's National Park Service. But that doesn't mean both entities can't sometimes do horrible things. What happened to Fazendeville was a horrible thing, and considering the patch of grass they "preserved" is stuffed between a refinery and a big shipping port, it's something that wasn't even necessary or all that beneficial. But they did it anyway, and a bunch of people suffered. Considering the probability that their descendents were still living in the Lower 9th in 2005, they're still suffering.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Creole Queen
Creole Queen
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 10:55:12
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'23"N - 89°59'38"W
  • While we were roaming the grounds of the Chalmette Battlefield, we noticed the sudden appearance of about a hundred tourists marching in formation past the Malus-Beauregard House toward the visitor center. No bus had arrived, which left only one possible method for their appearance. They must have come by boat! I didn't know you could do that, but we made our way to the tall levy that separated the battlefield from the river, climbed the stairs, and saw this boat, the Creole Queen Like virtually every paddlewheeler on the river these days, the Creole Queen is a late 20th century boat that runs on diesel. She was built in Mississippi in 1983 and has been running tourist cruises at New Orleans ever since. You can hop on the Creole Queen, tool around the river for a few hours, see the Chalmette Battlefield and other riverside attractions, and have all sorts of fun. If I'd seen an ad for this that morning, we probably would have done this.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Malus-Beauregard House
Malus-Beauregard House
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 11:05:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'26"N - 89°59'42"W
  • The Malus-Beauregard House is an old, antebellum plantation house that stands on the grounds of the Chalmette Battlefield, though it wasn't here during the battle. It was built about 20 years later, after the plantation where the battle was fought had been subdivided and sold. A different plantation house stood on this plantation when Andrew Jackson had his soldiers cut the plantation in half with their rampart. At that time, the thin strip of land running along the river in what is now St. Bernard Parish was cut into strips of sugar plantation, one after another. This plantation had been owned for about 30 years by a 60-year-old man named Ignace de Lino de Chalmette. Chalmette was a third-generation American Frenchman descended from French nobility and well respected among New Orleans society, but that didn't have any bearing on where Andrew Jackson decided to draw his line. It also didn't keep Jackson from burning everything on the plantation down. Chalmette's mansion, his barns, his slave houses, his sugar mills, everything had to burn to deny the advancing British any quarter. It happened so fast, Chalmette didn't even have time to remove any of his possessions. He lost everything. The trauma of it it proved too much, and Chalmette had a stroke and died immediately after the battle. After Chalmette's death, the plantation was carved into several 15-acre pieces. This piece was bought in 1832 by Alexander Baron, who in 1833 had this mansion built on the property for his mother-in-law, the Widow Malus.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississipp
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississipp
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 10:42:27
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'33"N - 89°59'37"W
  • A big oak tree I really liked, covered with Spanish moss, grows along the reconstruction of the mud rampart Col. Jackson's American troops built along a canal in the open field where they met the advancing British. I don't believe these cannons are period-accurate, though I'm not really a scholar of weaponry, so I can't be sure. In the past, I've irritated people who know history by suggesting that the United States won the War of 1812, when really, "won" is a very strong term. It's more that we didn't lose it. It's a war we really shouldn't have gotten into in the first place, when you consider the relative strengths of the combatants, and the fact that we came out of it owning the same territory we owned when we went in is nothing short of a miracle. The Battle of New Orleans is one example of how that happened, even though, as I've said, it took place two weeks after the Treaty of Ghent had been signed and played no role in how the property got doled out by the refs. But what if things had gone the other way, and the British had managed to capture New Orleans? The treaty was signed, but not yet ratified by Congress. Would the British have taken that as an opportunity to say, "Well, hold on now" and brought everybody back to the table? It's hard for me to say. So here's what happened. The War of 1812 was a big deal for the Americans, but it's only part of what Great Britain was doing at the moment. Over the Atlantic and closer to home, they were deep in the weeds of the Napoleonic Wars, which ranks pretty high on Great Britain's list of all-time greatest existential threats. The Americans had refused to go along with a trade embargo against France, and the Brits thought the Americans were already getting lippy about all sorts of other things--like, they'd get all mad every time the British Navy captured an American merchant ship and forced its crew to serve on British Navy ships--so the Brits decided they might as well have that war, too. Things went great for Britain for a little while, and they grabbed a bunch of forts up on the Great Lakes and won a few naval battles. But then the Americans grabbed several of the forts back, and by the fall of 1814, it became apparent that they were lurching toward stalemate. So in the end, the British decided that any treaty they'd sign with the Americans would be on the basis of uti possidetis, which is Latin for "you get to keep what you captured." Figuring that's how things would go, then, Great Britain decided to make a late push to capture whatever territory they could. There were lots of battles around the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain, but all those mostly worked out to a draw or an American win. The British also made plays along the Gulf Coast and up the Mississippi River, thinking if they took New Orleans, they could wrestle control of the Mississippi from the Americans for all time. On December 23, British Lieutenant General John Keane landed with a few thousand British soldiers at a plantation on the east bank of the Mississippi River, about 9 miles downstream from New Orleans, or just a mile or so from the spot in this picture. They could have run right up the road into New Orleans and taken the city right then, but the British of this era always seemed to miss that sort of thing. Seriously, that's a big reason why we're a country. So instead of taking New Orleans, the British camped and rested. This gave the 5,000 troops Col. Andrew Jackson had in the area time to set up his defenses. There was a battle the next day, and Keane was forced to pull back. It turned into a long standoff.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
We Fired Our Guns, And the British Kept A-Comin'
We Fired Our Guns, And the British Kept A-Comin'
  • Author: Clint Midwestwood Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-21 10:36:43
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 29°56'35"N - 89°59'36"W
  • Here's the modern view looking east from the reconstructed mud rampart where Col. Andrew Jackson's troops took his stand in the Battle of New Orleans. If you can get a feel for the topography of this spot, you can begin to see the challenge the British forces faced if they were going to take New Orleans. The biggest problem for the British troops was that New Orleans sat on a little ridge between the Mississippi River and the Louisiana swamp, in a place where you define a "ridge" as something three feet tall. The path an army could take to the city was a narrow one. That line of trees visible in the last picture and about a thousand feet to the left of where I was standing when I took this one marks the approximate line where the swamp would have started in 1815. The Mississippi River, meanwhile, is about a thousand feet to my right. The British were eventually able to land something like 14,000 troops to face off against the 5,000 troops of Andrew Jackson, but they had to come through this narrow, half-mile-wide lane. It's even worse than it seems here, as Jackson had picked this spot because the person who owned this plantation had dug a small canal between the swamp and the river right across the lane, and Jackson's troops had built the rampart just west of the canal. So they were protected by a moat. The British finally got tired of waiting and advanced 7,000 troops toward the rampart's ends on January 8, but Jackson's troops held them off. Great Britain's 93rd Highlanders then tried a diagonal attack across the field in front of the Americans, but that didn't work. After about two hours, the Brits had lost about 2,000 troops. The Americans had lost only 20. So in the end, the forces of Great Britain decided New Orleans wasn't worth the effort and pulled out to go home.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 3096. Photos on the current page: 15
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