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How to get to Back Forest (New South Wales) Hotel Back Forest (New South Wales)

Photos of Back Forest, New South Wales

photos found. 150. Photos on the current page: 15
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Field of View
Field of View
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-30 20:46:36
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'54"S - 150°39'18"O
  • With the cloud-cover that’s been a regular feature in my area for several weeks, and the full moon’s light washing out the Milky Way’s details in the early morning sky, what’s a photographer to do but draw from their reserves? Today’s image is from May of 2019, taken near the rural city of Nowra, Australia, showing the Milky Way’s core rising over the distant Coolangatta Mountain and its surrounding dairy country. One challenge with nightscape photography–well, with any style of photography–is to be creative with how you frame your shots. Rather than having the Milky Way’s core in the sky with only the ground to compare it to, I used an overhanging pine tree’s branches and fronds to obscure the sky just a little, trying to create a feeling of the trees revealing the heavenly wonders on display. I think I managed to get it just the way I wanted it, in the end. The vertical panorama was created by photographing eight overlapping images that were then edited in Adobe Lightroom, followed by stitching into the final single image using the now-discontinued software Autopano Pro. For each of those eight photos, I used my Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera, a Yongnuo 50mm f/1.4 lens @ f/1.8, using an exposure time of 8.0 seconds @ ISO 6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Arboreal Silhouettes
Arboreal Silhouettes
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-25 22:29:24
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'42"S - 150°38'57"O
  • I love it when atmospheric airglow and the light of the stars are bright enough to silhouette terrestrial objects like these bare trees, which I photographed near Nowra, Australia, in May of 2019. I shot the two photos with my Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera, a Yongnuo 50mm f/1.4 lens @ f/1.8, using an exposure time of 6.0 seconds @ ISO 6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Back Forest
Attractive force
Attractive force
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-30 21:39:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'41"S - 150°39'21"O
  • The total mass of our Milky Way galaxy is estimated to be about 1.5 TRILLION times that of our home star, the Sun, which is itself around 333,000 times the mass of the Earth. When I look at this photo, I instantly imagine that the gravitational force associated with these massive amounts of…mass is what’s bending the trees in towards the Milky Way and the planet Jupiter, in the middle of the scene. In reality, the apparent bending of the trees is from the warping and stitching processes used to create the final image out of the ten single, overlapping frames that I shot at this location in late May of 2019. Through the trees in the foreground, you can see the colour and light from the sky’s atmospheric airglow being reflected by the waters of Bolong Creek, a tributary of the Shoalhaven River in New South Wales, Australia. The treetops are slightly blurred from their movement in the stiff breeze that was pushing through the area at the time. The ten original photographs that I used to make up this image were each captured with a Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera, through a Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 lens @ f/2.4, using an exposure time of 13 seconds @ ISO 6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Make hay while the Milky Way shines
Make hay while the Milky Way shines
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-25 22:09:08
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'42"S - 150°38'57"O
  • That’s how the old saying goes, isn’t it? Not quite, but maybe it should. I bumped into the hay bales–quite literally–in this paddock near Nowra, Australia, back in May, while looking for gnarly trees to photograph as foregrounds for more Milky Way photos. As I wasn’t actually meant to be in the paddock–gates are for climbing over, no?–I didn’t want to turn on my LED headlamp, so was moving around carefully using a dim red LED for guidance. The range of the light wasn’t quite enough to show up the shapes of the bales, so I ended up walking straight into one of them. This image is a simple, single-frame photograph that I shot with my Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera, a Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 lens @ f/2.4, using an exposure time of 15 seconds @ ISO 6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Milky Way at 50 millimetres
The Milky Way at 50 millimetres
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-30 20:09:46
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'54"S - 150°39'18"O
  • Using a 50 mm lens for this photo has increased the sense of scale between the Milky Way and the earthly elements like the barn, the power poles and yes, once again, the pair of silos that I like to feature in my shots. The silos are near the centre of the image and are about 250 metres (820 feet) from where I took the photo. In the picture before this in my feed you can see the Milky Way rising from behind the silos, but with the camera placed only around ten metres from the derelict duo. That difference in the distance has the effect of making the Milky Way look huge in today’s image. I have already mentioned that I took this shot with a 50 mm lens fixed to my camera, but here are the details of the gear and settings overall. To capture this single-frame image, I used Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera, a Yongnuo 50mm f/1.4 lens @ f/1.8 using an exposure time of 8.0 seconds @ ISO6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Silos again
Silos again
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-27 22:39:24
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'57"S - 150°39'28"O
  • These sidelined silos will be familiar to folk who’ve followed me over the last two years. One of them made a cameo appearance in the previous fortnight, in fact. When I visited the site and shot this photo (plus a bunch of others) in April, the Milky Way’s core had not long cleared the decrepit corrugated iron roof that straddles the two concrete cylinders. Much closer to Earth than our galaxy‘s centre, but looking here to be a bright spot in the dark nebula known as the Dark Horse or the Galactic Kiwi, Jupiter was also climbing into the evening sky. For this single-frame image, I pushed my Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera’s ISO setting to 12,800, shooting through a Canon 40 mm lens at f/2.8 for an exposure time of 10 seconds.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bereft of cover under the cover of the sky
Bereft of cover under the cover of the sky
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-11 00:21:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°51'47"S - 150°40'29"O
  • There was a moderate wind blowing when I shot this scene last Friday night, 10th May, causing the blurring of the tree on the right-hand side of my photo. The lack of foliage on the central tree left its branches less affected by the wind, resulting in a lot of it looking sharp and still. Apart from the blue and red lights that you can see on the farm building, nothing of the rest of that structure was visible to the naked eye. Presiding above the whole scene is the beautiful edge-on view that we have of our Milky Way galaxy, forming a majestic arch that draws the eye to its presence. Jupiter, the most massive of our solar system’s planets, is seen here as a large and slightly fuzzy white dot shining from within the Milky Way’s belt. Saturn is hiding in the top branches of the tree. Down near the horizon, particularly towards the left, the sky looks bright, as if the moon was about to rise, or the sun close to announcing itself for the day. In fact, the moon had set over three hours before I stopped here, and the sun’s rise was still about six hours away. The light that you can see is from the atmospheric phenomenon known as “airglow”. On several night trips to areas far from urban light pollution I have observed airglow so bright that I didn’t need a torch or headlamp to see where I was walking. As I couldn’t get the whole scene in with just one photo, I shot two slightly-overlapping frames and then used some stitching software to blend them into this final single image. Here is the equipment and the settings used: Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera, a Samyang 14mm f/2.4 lens @ f/2.8, using an exposure time of 25 seconds @ ISO 6400. I used a Litra Pro LED bank to light the foreground (and beyond).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Same place, different season
Same place, different season
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-12-03 09:09:57
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'57"S - 150°39'28"O
  • Here in Australia, we recognise our seasons as commencing on the first day of a calendar quarter. Winter begins on the first day of June. Spring, the first of September. With today being the second of December, we’ve already had one full day of summer pass by. That means it is six months since I was shivering through a winter night, shooting nightscape images using these silos in the foreground. It certainly doesn’t feel like it was that long ago! With the Milky Way’s galactic core now lost in the brightness of the evening twilight–Milky Way season is over–you will likely see more posts from me and other nightscape photographers featuring star-trails and deep-sky objects. I had planned to shoot at least two hours worth of star-trails at the silos last night, but a very thick fog floated in and put an end to that. The trails I did get were long enough to make a good image from, and I even achieved a result I’d set out to get, which was some trails showing between the silos and through the holes in the perishing roof. There is a fog-piercing light a few hundred metres along the road from the silos, and it provided an eerie glow to back-light the scene. To create this final image I shot 123 single-frame photos in 55 minutes. I captured each of those frames with a Canon EOS 6D camera, fitted with a Samyang 14mm XP lens @ f/2.8, exposed for 25 seconds @ ISO 800.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Abanonded silos under an abundant sky
Abanonded silos under an abundant sky
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-14 21:36:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'57"S - 150°39'28"O
  • In Australia and other Southern Hemisphere countries, June = winter, which means longer nights with generally clearer skies than in the summer months. June also sees the Milky Way’s densest region, the galactic core, heading up towards the zenith earlier each night. You can see from my photo, taken at 9:30 pm on June 14th, that the core is clear of the horizon now well before midnight. The silos have been abandoned for several years, but in between my visits here on Monday night and Thursday night of this week some debris and dirt had been removed from one of them, so perhaps they might be recommissioned soon. I do hope a new roof is included in the renovation so that whatever is going to be stored here doesn’t get wet. Still, I don’t mind the holes in the roof as they let me see the sky and stars behind the structure. The location of this shoot was Jennings Lane, a narrow but sealed rural roadway east of Nowra, on Australia’s southeast coast. I would have driven past the lane hundreds of times since I started holidaying further down the coast in 1976, but never noticed it until a few years back when I was looking for a photography spot alongside the nearby river. Even though I used a 14mm wide-angle lens here, the silos were too large to fit into a single shot. The way around that was to capture three overlapping photos and stitch them together in software. Each of the three images was shot with a Canon EOS 6D MkII camera, a Samyang 14mm XP lens @ f/2.8, using a 30-second exposure @ ISO 6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Lights in the dark water
Lights in the dark water
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-14 21:05:25
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°49'42"S - 150°38'57"O
  • The still & dark water in this narrow irrigation channel provided a natural mirror for me to photograph the reflected starlight from the Milky Way. I intentionally framed the shot so that you can’t see the Milky Way in the sky. You have to look down at the channel to see what’s up above! If you look carefully you can see the shape of the constellation Scorpius, the scorpion, near my watermark at the bottom of the frame. Mars had risen shortly before I took this photo and was low in the sky over the distant shape of Coolangatta Mountain. Canon EOS 6D, Samyang 14mm @ f/2.8, 30 sec @ ISO 6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Gateway to the galaxies
Gateway to the galaxies
  • Author: nightscapades Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-14 21:59:55
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°50'36"S - 150°40'23"O
  • As always, folks, I appreciate all of the Likes, comments and referrals that you keep giving to my posts as well as each new follower who joins up to my feed. I've been a bit stuck for new content of late, especially stuff that's different to the usual, so hang in there and don't lose interest, please! Tonight I take you back to those galactic siblings of the Southern Hemisphere, the Magellanic Clouds. At many southern latitudes the Clouds are circumpolar, which means that they never go below the horizon. At the South Pole, where the South Celestial Pole is directly overhead, these two orbs would circle at 21 degrees out from the zenith and 18 degrees out (for the Large and Small, respectively). Sometimes I wonder what it would be like to be on a planet orbiting one of the many stars in these two galaxies and look up to see the Milky Way dominating the sky. It would be cloud-like, I assume, but much bigger and brighter than these two little fuzzy patches that we get to see in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, South American countries and all places at similar latitudes. A single shot captured with Canon EOS 6D, Rokinon 24mm @ f/2.4, 15 sec @ ISO 6400.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Shoalhaven River from Two Figs Winery
The Shoalhaven River from Two Figs Winery
  • Author: Sten Parker Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-09-27 12:55:04
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°51'24"S - 150°41'6"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Two Figs Winery
Two Figs Winery
  • Author: Andy Hutchinson Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-11-06 19:22:31
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°51'18"S - 150°40'53"O
  • Clouds looked like they were going to turn on the razzle-dazzle last night so I headed out early and called on my friends Alison and Shane who own the Two Figs Winery. The view from their vantage-point on the hill was awesome and the sun did not let me down. This was taken fairly low over the lower vines, looking south down the Shoalhaven River towards Nowra.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
#holidays #wine #niceview
#holidays #wine #niceview
  • Author: fgiono Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-05-10 20:27:38
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°51'24"S - 150°41'6"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Majestic Arch
Majestic Arch
  • Author: douggyi1 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-08-14 23:41:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 34°50'42"S - 150°40'31"O
  • Broughton Creek, Nowra, Australia. I can't get enough of photographing the Milky Way in different settings & having water in the foreground adds extra interest, I find. This panoramic image is made up from 16 smaller photos, stitched together with the application AutoPano Pro. 16 images, each shot with Canon EOS 6D, Samyang 14mm @ f/4.0, 20 sec @ ISO 6400
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 150. Photos on the current page: 15
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