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How to get to Banda Banda (New South Wales) Hotel Banda Banda (New South Wales)

Photos of Banda Banda, New South Wales

photos found. 45. Photos on the current page: 15
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Small leaf fig (Ficus obliqua)
Small leaf fig (Ficus obliqua)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:56:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'26"S - 152°28'48"O
  • One of Australia's largest rainforest trees may be seen in the mid north coast region of New South Wales. The laser returned a figure of 66.1 metres. (64.4 metres on the screen, 1.7 metres added for the height above the ground at eye level). The tree was measured on the other side of the Wilson River, and the base of the tree was somewhat raised above the river bank. Though 150 metres downstream of the laser. So the actual figure would be less than this number, by a metre or three. 63 or 64 metres tall are quotable figures for this tree. I'm dubious of published heights of Australian trees. The scientists are too conservative. And the commercial and tourist publications exaggerate. These figs are immense; they are giants, leviathans, colossal in the height and breadth. There's one nearly as tall, up at Sheepstation Creek in the Border Ranges. Scientific publications say this tree may reach 30 metres. Don't you believe it! Other tree species over 45 metres tall nearby include Brush Box, Red Carabeen, Yellow Carabeen, White Beech and Sydney Blue Gum. (Lophostemon confertus, Karrabina benthamiana, Sloanea woollsii, Gmelina leichhardtii and Eucalyptus saligna).
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Coachwood (Ceratopetalum apetalum)
Coachwood (Ceratopetalum apetalum)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:24:02
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'49"S - 152°28'59"O
  • ferns are mostly the Umbrella Fern (Sticherus flabellatus var. flabellatus). Near Wilson River, Willi Willi National Park.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Wilson River with the Mat Rush (Lomandra hystrix)
Wilson River with the Mat Rush (Lomandra hystrix)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:28:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'49"S - 152°28'54"O
  • Rainforests often grow in gullies or valleys with a stream or river at the base. This particular forest is tall, with rainforest trees from 15 to 60+ metres in height. Near this spot is a fig tree, measured at 63 metres tall. One of the greatest trees in Australia. Very wide at the base, and with a huge spreading canopy. Beside the river, is a wall of vines and light seeking plants. The rainfall here is two metres per year, a high amount for Australia. The river was at low levels at this time. The stream flows from right to left.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
White Beech (Gmelina leichhardtii)
White Beech (Gmelina leichhardtii)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:34:31
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'37"S - 152°28'50"O
  • Often this is all you have to identify a tree. No leaves, flowers or fruit, just the base. White Beech growing near the Wilson River. Impossible to state the height, as the top was invisible. Could be around 40 to 50 metres tall. An impressive sight.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Red Carabeen (Karrabina benthamiana)
Red Carabeen (Karrabina benthamiana)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 10:29:19
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'22"S - 152°28'43"O
  • Often this is all you have to identify a tree. No leaves, flowers or fruit, just the base. This is a giant of a tree, I measured side branches at 46 metres, but I could barely see the top, so it may be around 50. Ephiphtic ferns are in the Microsorum genus.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Blue Gum & Blackbutt (E. saligna & pilularis)
Blue Gum & Blackbutt (E. saligna & pilularis)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 13:08:10
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°13'56"S - 152°27'6"O
  • Sydney Blue Gum & Blackbutt (Eucalyptus saligna & pilularis). Trees are between 30 and 50 metres tall. Most likely re-growth from previous logging. Down the gully is an old, bent, thick Tallowwood; measured at 56 metres tall. This spot is one of the most memorable eucalyptus forests in my travels. The Blue Gum is the smooth barked tree. On rare occasions the bark does appear somewhat blue (with a bit of imagination). Rough Tree Fern & Palm Lily (Cordyline) are in shot in the lower corners of the picture. This photo was taken, while we waited for our friends in the other car to drive up from the Wilson River below. They were many minutes delayed, probably taking their time and enjoying the scenery.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Rainforest Spinach (Elatostema reticulatum)
Rainforest Spinach (Elatostema reticulatum)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:06:03
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'47"S - 152°29'13"O
  • A non stinging member of the nettle family. Often found in or near rainforests in moist sites.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
White Fingers (Clavaria fragilis)
White Fingers (Clavaria fragilis)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:51:38
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'37"S - 152°28'50"O
  • Identification needs to be checked. The habitat is sub-tropical rainforest.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Windfall orchids
Windfall orchids
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 10:00:17
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'35"S - 152°28'48"O
  • Bulbophyllum exiguum & Dendrobium gracilicaule. Both on a fallen branch from a sub tropical rainforest tree. On the low right is an out of focus image of a fruit of the Yellow Carabeen. Bulbophyllum shepherdii and Pyrossia confluens are also in shot. The hanging moss is likely to be Papillaria flavo-limbata.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Wilson River, with Lomandra hystrix
Wilson River, with Lomandra hystrix
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:28:04
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'31"S - 152°28'50"O
  • a sub tropical rainforest stream in eastern Australia. Mat Rush (Lomandra hystrix) is a common stream-side plant.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
White Beech (Gmelina leichhardtii)
White Beech (Gmelina leichhardtii)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:33:54
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'37"S - 152°28'50"O
  • White Beech, around 45 metres tall
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dwarf Finger Fern (Grammitis stenophylla)
Dwarf Finger Fern (Grammitis stenophylla)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-19 11:08:57
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'47"S - 152°29'13"O
  • Endangered species, beside a waterfall near the Wilson River. Willi Willi National Park.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Sydney Blue Gum (Eucalyptus saligna)
Sydney Blue Gum (Eucalyptus saligna)
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-11-24 23:47:47
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'30"S - 152°28'47"O
  • Is a eucalyptus tree a rainforest species? Mostly no, but sometimes yes. Here's a mature Sydney Blue Gum growing in a sub tropical rainforest. It would have grown here from a windblown seed. After a storm, a gap would have formed in this ancient rainforest, and the seed jumped in, and took its place amongst the rainforest canopy. This may have happened after winds knocked down a couple of big rainforest trees. And then an open area was formed, with enough sunlight for the eucalyptus seedling to grow. Some rainforests have ancient old eucalyptus trees, surrounded by approaching rainforest trees, taking over their former eucalyptus habitat. This happens with the absence of fire. It's a case of rainforest succession, where a lack of fire lets rainforest species invade the understorey. And then make so much shade that the eucalyptus can't regenerate. But in this case, it's a very old rainforest in a rainforest gully. This eucalyptus is an opportunist. The Blue Gum in the photo would send down millions of seeds, but almost none would do any good in the rainforest below, as it's so shady. Yes, in some cases Eucalyptus trees are genuine rainforest inhabitants. The dark tree on the right is a more conventional rainforest species, the Black Booyong. The greatest Australian rainforest botanist called this area "warm temperate rainforest type 33". Yes there are warm temperate species present such as the Coachwood and Golden Sassafras. But the sub tropical elements outweigh all else. Tall buttressed rainforest trees, heaps of epiphytes, thick vines, orchids, bangalow palms, walking stick palms, strangler figs, many sub tropical tree species. The fig on the other side of the river is 63 metres tall. This rainforest surely is sub tropical. It's just about everything a sub tropical rainforest is supposed to be. Returned to the area last weekend. And was positive that this is a typical sub tropical rainforest. A.G. Floyd was describing the warm temperate rainforest just near here. The rainforests change from warm temperate to sub tropical regularly along the course of the river. Of course an expert like him could not make such a basic error. The warm temperate rainforests nearby are so contrastingly different to this fabulous sub-troppo jungle.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bulbophyllum exiguum
Bulbophyllum exiguum
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-11-24 23:48:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°12'30"S - 152°28'47"O
  • small orchids on the trunk of a fallen tree.
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
"A Tree" Blackbutt Reserve
  • Author: Poytr Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-11-25 02:34:18
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 31°14'10"S - 152°27'17"O
  • Hastings Forest Way. Preserved trees, around 30 to 40 metres tall. Growing at an unusually high altitude for this species (Eucalyptus pilularis, around 650 metres above sea level).
  • License*: Attribution-NoDerivs License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 45. Photos on the current page: 15
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