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How to get to Hilldale (New South Wales) Hotel Hilldale (New South Wales)

Photos of Hilldale, New South Wales

photos found. 71. Photos on the current page: 15
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NR33 + DL46 & NR61 7MB HILLDALE 3rd Dec 2005
NR33 + DL46 & NR61 7MB HILLDALE 3rd Dec 2005
  • Author: petercousins47 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2005-12-03 16:42:16
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'17"S - 151°38'57"O
  • Less than 7 months before it was involved in a level crossing accident in Victoria, NR 33 leads DL46 & NR61 (the first NR Class locomotive to be delivered), through Hilldale hauling 7BM2 on 3rd Dec. 2005. NR33 became the first NR written off following the accident in June 2006.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ageratina adenophora flowerhead NC4
Ageratina adenophora flowerhead NC4
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:07:10
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Hilldale
Ageratina adenophora leaf NC5
Ageratina adenophora leaf NC5
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:06:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ageratina adenophora leaf NC4
Ageratina adenophora leaf NC4
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:06:43
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ageratina adenophora plant NC10
Ageratina adenophora plant NC10
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:06:17
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ageratina adenophora plant NC11
Ageratina adenophora plant NC11
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:05:32
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ageratina adenophora plant NC9
Ageratina adenophora plant NC9
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:05:24
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
SCT003 SCT014 & CSR012 7MB9 HILLDALE 5th Aug 2018
SCT003 SCT014 & CSR012 7MB9 HILLDALE 5th Aug 2018
  • Author: petercousins47 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-05 13:44:10
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'8"S - 151°39'16"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
PACIFIC NATIONAL 8236 & 4894 #6422 SUGAR & CEMENT HILLDALE PLATFORM 5th Aug 2018.
PACIFIC NATIONAL 8236 & 4894 #6422 SUGAR & CEMENT HILLDALE PLATFORM 5th Aug 2018.
  • Author: petercousins47 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-05 13:32:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'16"S - 151°38'58"O
  • 6422 operates from Grafton to Morandoo with bulk sugar and empty cement. Operates up to 4 services per week. The 48 class is returning to Newcastle after a stint of shunting and trip trains around Grafton. 48101 had travelled north behind 8236 the previous day as replacement for 4894. Hilldale Platform still served by 5 railcar services each way on weekdays and 3 on Weekends and Public Holidays. 'a' stop only worked by Hunter or Endeavour railcars.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
1WB3 STEEL NR85 + TT112 & LDP004 HILLDALE 11th Mar 2019.
1WB3 STEEL NR85 + TT112 & LDP004 HILLDALE 11th Mar 2019.
  • Author: petercousins47 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-11 10:47:49
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'9"S - 151°39'20"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ageratina adenophora flowerhead NC7
Ageratina adenophora flowerhead NC7
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:07:22
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ageratina adenophora flowerhead NC5
Ageratina adenophora flowerhead NC5
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-10 08:07:16
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'30"S - 151°40'40"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, perennial, erect herb; 1-2 m tall and often with many stems arising from an underground crown. Stems and leaves are covered with sticky hairs. Leaves are opposite, triangular to diamond-shaped and 4-12 cm long, with toothed margins. Flowerheads consist of numerous clusters of white heads (5-8 mm wide) at the stem tips. Flowering is in late winter and spring. A native of Central America, it is a weed of land with poor ground cover and prefers moist, fertile, frost free growing conditions. Mostly occurs on land that has not been revegetated or where there is limited grazing (e.g. forests, roadsides and wasteland). Produces large numbers of seeds that are transported by wind, water, vehicles, hay and stock. Very palatable, but poisonous to horses; thought to be most poisonous when in flower. Horses may develop symptoms after several months of exposure to the plant and this can eventually lead to death from respiratory failure. Sheep and goats also find it palatable, but eat it without ill effect as long as other pasture is available. It is unpalatable to cattle. Controlled by digging out isolated plants (including crowns); regular slashing; spraying with herbicides in late summer/autumn; grazing with goats and; establishing and managing competitive pastures for good groundcover and bulk.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
PACIFIC NATIONAL 8236 & 4894 #6422 SUGAR & CEMENT HILLDALE 5th Aug 2018.
PACIFIC NATIONAL 8236 & 4894 #6422 SUGAR & CEMENT HILLDALE 5th Aug 2018.
  • Author: petercousins47 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-05 13:32:12
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'10"S - 151°39'2"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
IMG_0082 CSR007 SCT015 Hilldale 3MB9 16.8.17_1
IMG_0082 CSR007 SCT015 Hilldale 3MB9 16.8.17_1
  • Author: Brians Railway, Bus and Shipping Collection Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-16 14:20:48
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'9"S - 151°39'23"O
  • First run of a CSR Class Locomotive on SCT's Melbourne to Brisbane service
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
4417 - Hilldale
4417 - Hilldale
  • Author: ChrisAnderson7575 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-04-30 13:27:25
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°30'22"S - 151°39'46"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 71. Photos on the current page: 15
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