ManyFoto.com: photos from the world.

Getting started:

  1. Select the country.
  2. Find location in the text box
    [ Type in an address or City/locality: ]
  3. If necessary change the search radius.
  4. If necessary you can move the marker on the map.
  5. Start the search with
    [ See the photos ]

Or use:

  1. [ Search in ManyFoto.com by Google ]
Note:
manyfoto.com uses the Flickr API but is not endorsed or certified by Flickr.
How to get to Tabbil Creek (New South Wales) Hotel Tabbil Creek (New South Wales)

Photos of Tabbil Creek, New South Wales

photos found. 1231. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Vintage Car - 1928 Model A Ford
Vintage Car - 1928 Model A Ford
  • Author: Paul Leader - Paulie's Time Off Photography Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-01-24 11:41:08
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'9"S - 151°45'25"O
  • Seen here at the local Ford Dealership in Dungog NSW
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Andrews Presbyterian Church - Dungog NSW - built 1904 - see below
St Andrews Presbyterian Church - Dungog NSW - built 1904 - see below
  • Author: Paul Leader - Paulie's Time Off Photography Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-01-24 11:24:31
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'20"S - 151°45'25"O
  • St Andrews Church is historically and aesthetically significant at the local level as a fine example of a Gothic style building with steeply pitched gable roof and a prominent tower with steeple, with a copper roof and timber venting. The building is important as a place of religion and other important elements of the site include St Andrews Church Hall, the matching fence to the street boundaries, and the mature trees. It is located within the vicinity of other heritage buildings including the hall and the school. Info source: www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDe...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Find the Best Accomodations located to Tabbil Creek, New South Wales
  • New deals listed every day
  • FREE cancellation on most rooms!
  • No booking fees, Save money!, Best Price Guaranteed
  • Manage your booking on the go
  • Book last minute without a credit card!
  • Find out more at Booking.com Reviews
Hotel Tabbil Creek
ROYAL HOTEL - Dungog NSW - see below
ROYAL HOTEL - Dungog NSW - see below
  • Author: Paul Leader - Paulie's Time Off Photography Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-01-24 11:22:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'18"S - 151°45'25"O
  • The first hotel on this site, built by Alexander Donaldson in 1850, was a single storey of timber construction. This was replaced by a two storey building of rendered brick in the simple Victorian Georgian style, which had a shingle roof and an upper balcony. First known as 'The Durham Hotel', it was later changed in name to 'The Royal Hotel'. It was demolished and rebuilt in Federation style with a two storey brick facade in 1912. The present hotel was built in Inter-war Functionalist style in 1939 by Tooths Breweries. Copeman, Lemont & Keesing were the architects and Field & Roach, the builders. The hotel is now privately owned. Info source: Plaque on building dated 2008 provided by Dungog Historical Society.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dungog Post Office NSW - built 1880 - see below
Dungog Post Office NSW - built 1880 - see below
  • Author: Paul Leader - Paulie's Time Off Photography Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-01-24 11:34:33
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'11"S - 151°45'25"O
  • The building is historically significant as the evidence of early communications for Dungog. Having been built in 1880, the post office is historically significant for the evidence it provides of the development of a postal service and demand by the township for postal services during the 1870's. The Dungog Post Office is aesthetically significant at the local level as a late 19th century commercial building. Despite alterations much of the basic form is intact and the building is important within the streetscape, set within a commercial precinct containing other historically and aesthetically important buildings. Info source (edited): www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDe...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dungog Cinema aka James Theatre - built 1914 - 1930 - see below
Dungog Cinema aka James Theatre - built 1914 - 1930 - see below
  • Author: Paul Leader - Paulie's Time Off Photography Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-01-24 11:03:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'7"S - 151°45'30"O
  • In 1913 an 'open-air' picture theatre, showing silent movies, was located on this site with a roof being added to the structure in 1914. Extensive renovations were undertaken by architect Mr Jeater and builders Stephenson and Rigler in 1930 when Spanish style facade was added. Known locally as the James Theatre, it was named after James Stuart who owned and operated the cinema for 24 years. In the 1980's, the Dungog Council acquired the building for use as a community centre and cinema. It is purported to be the oldest continually licensed cinema in New South Wales. Info source: Plaque on building dated 2008 provided by Dungog Historical Society.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ozothamnus diosmifolius leaf NC3
Ozothamnus diosmifolius leaf NC3
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2014-10-03 09:56:47
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°23'50"S - 151°44'18"O
  • Much-branched, erect shrub to 5 m tall, but usually about 2 m tall. Leaves are linear, 10–15 mm long and 1–2 mm wide; margins are tightly revolute; lamina discolorous, upper surface green and scabrous, lower surface white-woolly. Flowerheads have numerous heads in dense terminal corymbs; heads are globose, 2–3 mm long and contain 20-22 florets; involucral bracts are opaque white or pink. Flowers from late winter to spring. Grows on margins of rainforest and in heath in a variety of soils, often on ridges.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ozothamnus diosmifolius leaf NC4
Ozothamnus diosmifolius leaf NC4
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2014-10-03 09:56:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°23'50"S - 151°44'18"O
  • Much-branched, erect shrub to 5 m tall, but usually about 2 m tall. Leaves are linear, 10–15 mm long and 1–2 mm wide; margins are tightly revolute; lamina discolorous, upper surface green and scabrous, lower surface white-woolly. Flowerheads have numerous heads in dense terminal corymbs; heads are globose, 2–3 mm long and contain 20-22 florets; involucral bracts are opaque white or pink. Flowers from late winter to spring. Grows on margins of rainforest and in heath in a variety of soils, often on ridges.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ozothamnus diosmifolius plant NC2
Ozothamnus diosmifolius plant NC2
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2014-10-03 09:47:51
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°23'50"S - 151°44'18"O
  • Much-branched, erect shrub to 5 m tall, but usually about 2 m tall. Leaves are linear, 10–15 mm long and 1–2 mm wide; margins are tightly revolute; lamina discolorous, upper surface green and scabrous, lower surface white-woolly. Flowerheads have numerous heads in dense terminal corymbs; heads are globose, 2–3 mm long and contain 20-22 florets; involucral bracts are opaque white or pink. Flowers from late winter to spring. Grows on margins of rainforest and in heath in a variety of soils, often on ridges.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ozothamnus diosmifolius leaf NC5
Ozothamnus diosmifolius leaf NC5
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2014-10-03 09:57:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°23'50"S - 151°44'18"O
  • Much-branched, erect shrub to 5 m tall, but usually about 2 m tall. Leaves are linear, 10–15 mm long and 1–2 mm wide; margins are tightly revolute; lamina discolorous, upper surface green and scabrous, lower surface white-woolly. Flowerheads have numerous heads in dense terminal corymbs; heads are globose, 2–3 mm long and contain 20-22 florets; involucral bracts are opaque white or pink. Flowers from late winter to spring. Grows on margins of rainforest and in heath in a variety of soils, often on ridges.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Crassula sieberiana flower NC5
Crassula sieberiana flower NC5
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-09 08:19:50
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'0"S - 151°45'23"O
  • Native cool-season annual succulent herb to 20 cm tall. Leaves are fleshy, grey-brown to reddish, sessile and 4-10 mm long. Flowerheads are short spikes or panicles of small (1-2 mm long) pale red to yellow flowers borne in the axils of leaf-like bracts. Flowers mostly in spring. Found where there is little competition. Often grows under intermittently dry and wet conditions (e.g. sandy river flats). Native biodiversity. A very minor component of pastures, it is an indicator of bare ground and poor competition. Although it is palatable to stock, it is of no importance in pastures, as it produces very little bulk and is relatively short-lived.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Crassula sieberiana flower NC6
Crassula sieberiana flower NC6
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-09 08:20:08
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'0"S - 151°45'22"O
  • Native cool-season annual succulent herb to 20 cm tall. Leaves are fleshy, grey-brown to reddish, sessile and 4-10 mm long. Flowerheads are short spikes or panicles of small (1-2 mm long) pale red to yellow flowers borne in the axils of leaf-like bracts. Flowers mostly in spring. Found where there is little competition. Often grows under intermittently dry and wet conditions (e.g. sandy river flats). Native biodiversity. A very minor component of pastures, it is an indicator of bare ground and poor competition. Although it is palatable to stock, it is of no importance in pastures, as it produces very little bulk and is relatively short-lived.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Stachys arvensis flower NC4
Stachys arvensis flower NC4
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-09 08:21:40
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'0"S - 151°45'23"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, annual, erect herb to 35 cm tall. Stems are hairy. Leaves are stalked, opposite, 1-4 cm long, broad and deeply veined, with rounded teeth on the leaf margins. Flowers are 5-7 mm long, pink to purple and occur in small clusters in the axils of the upper leaves. Flowering is in winter and early spring. A native of Europe and North Africa, it is a weed of cultivation and disturbed land, such as around watering points, stockyards and stream banks. Poisonous to cattle, horses, pigs and sheep. Most cases occur in late winter and spring, causing a range of symptoms including weakness, staggers with stilted gait, dullness and diarrhoea. Older plants are generally more toxic than younger ones. Do not graze stock where infestations occur. Remove stock and rest them for several days to 2 weeks if they have grazed plants. Healthy vigorous pastures are an effective control. Registered herbicides are available for control in pastures.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Stachys arvensis flower NC5
Stachys arvensis flower NC5
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-09 08:22:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'0"S - 151°45'23"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, annual, erect herb to 35 cm tall. Stems are hairy. Leaves are stalked, opposite, 1-4 cm long, broad and deeply veined, with rounded teeth on the leaf margins. Flowers are 5-7 mm long, pink to purple and occur in small clusters in the axils of the upper leaves. Flowering is in winter and early spring. A native of Europe and North Africa, it is a weed of cultivation and disturbed land, such as around watering points, stockyards and stream banks. Poisonous to cattle, horses, pigs and sheep. Most cases occur in late winter and spring, causing a range of symptoms including weakness, staggers with stilted gait, dullness and diarrhoea. Older plants are generally more toxic than younger ones. Do not graze stock where infestations occur. Remove stock and rest them for several days to 2 weeks if they have grazed plants. Healthy vigorous pastures are an effective control. Registered herbicides are available for control in pastures.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Stachys arvensis flower NC6
Stachys arvensis flower NC6
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-09 08:22:14
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'0"S - 151°45'23"O
  • Introduced, cool-season, annual, erect herb to 35 cm tall. Stems are hairy. Leaves are stalked, opposite, 1-4 cm long, broad and deeply veined, with rounded teeth on the leaf margins. Flowers are 5-7 mm long, pink to purple and occur in small clusters in the axils of the upper leaves. Flowering is in winter and early spring. A native of Europe and North Africa, it is a weed of cultivation and disturbed land, such as around watering points, stockyards and stream banks. Poisonous to cattle, horses, pigs and sheep. Most cases occur in late winter and spring, causing a range of symptoms including weakness, staggers with stilted gait, dullness and diarrhoea. Older plants are generally more toxic than younger ones. Do not graze stock where infestations occur. Remove stock and rest them for several days to 2 weeks if they have grazed plants. Healthy vigorous pastures are an effective control. Registered herbicides are available for control in pastures.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Trifolium repens flowerhead NC6
Trifolium repens flowerhead NC6
  • Author: Macleay Grass Man Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-04 09:37:07
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 32°24'13"S - 151°45'27"O
  • Introduced yearlong-green perennial hairless mat-forming legume with stolons. Leaves have 3 broad-obovate leaflets, each 6-40 mm long and on stalks of equal length; white crescent markings may be present. Flowerheads are dense, ball-like clusters of more than 20 small, white, pea-like flowers. Flowers throughout the year. A native of Europe, it is one of the most widely sown and naturalised clovers on the coast. Grows on a wide range of soil types provided they have medium to high fertility (especially phosphorus and sulfur) and reasonable drainage. Tolerant of soil pHCa greater than 4.5 and soil aluminium less than 10% of CEC. Provides high quality feed for livestock, is suitable for hay or silage and provides a high potential nitrogen input to soils. Can be a high bloat risk when abundant in pastures and in some areas it is susceptible to nematodes. Varieties vary in the abundance of stolons and the size of the stems and leaves. Select varieties to suit the particular grazing management and climate. Can be surface-sown or direct-drilled into existing pasture and combines well with many perennial grasses and herbs. Can withstand close grazing. Vigorous grass growth may outcompete it; keep pastures less than 15 cm in height to allow light to penetrate for clover.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 1231. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Back to top