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How to get to Henri-Chapelle (Wallonne) Hotel Henri-Chapelle (Wallonne)

Photos of Henri-Chapelle, Wallonne

photos found. 939. Photos on the current page: 15
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Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:50:19
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'50"N - 5°54'5"O
  • At the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium, covering 57 acres, rest 7,992 of United States military dead, most of whom lost their lives during the advance of the U.S. armed forces into Germany. Their headstones are arranged in gentle arcs sweeping across a broad green lawn that slopes gently downhill. A highway passes through the cemetery. West of the highway is an overlook that affords an excellent view of the rolling Belgian countryside, once a battlefield. To the east is the long colonnade that, with the chapel and map room, forms the memorial overlooking the burial area. The chapel is simple, but richly ornamented. In the map room are two maps of military operations, carved in black granite, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of their forces. On the rectangular piers of the colonnade are inscribed the names of 450 missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. The seals of the states and territories are also carved on these piers. The cemetery possesses great military historic significance as it holds fallen Americans of two major efforts, one covering the U.S. First Army's drive in September 1944 through northern France, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg into Germany, and the second covering the Battle of the Bulge. It was from the temporary cemetery at Henri-Chapelle that the first shipments of remains of American war dead were returned to the United States for permanent burial. The repatriation program began on July 27, 1947 at a special ceremony at the cemetery when the disinterment began. The first shipment of 5,600 American war dead from Henri-Chapelle left Antwerp, Belgium the first week of October 1947. An impressive ceremony was held, with over 30,000 Belgian citizens attending, along with representatives of the Belgium government and senior Americans. Burials: 7992 Missing in Action: 450 Acres: 57.00
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:49:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'51"N - 5°54'8"O
  • At the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium, covering 57 acres, rest 7,992 of United States military dead, most of whom lost their lives during the advance of the U.S. armed forces into Germany. Their headstones are arranged in gentle arcs sweeping across a broad green lawn that slopes gently downhill. A highway passes through the cemetery. West of the highway is an overlook that affords an excellent view of the rolling Belgian countryside, once a battlefield. To the east is the long colonnade that, with the chapel and map room, forms the memorial overlooking the burial area. The chapel is simple, but richly ornamented. In the map room are two maps of military operations, carved in black granite, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of their forces. On the rectangular piers of the colonnade are inscribed the names of 450 missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. The seals of the states and territories are also carved on these piers. The cemetery possesses great military historic significance as it holds fallen Americans of two major efforts, one covering the U.S. First Army's drive in September 1944 through northern France, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg into Germany, and the second covering the Battle of the Bulge. It was from the temporary cemetery at Henri-Chapelle that the first shipments of remains of American war dead were returned to the United States for permanent burial. The repatriation program began on July 27, 1947 at a special ceremony at the cemetery when the disinterment began. The first shipment of 5,600 American war dead from Henri-Chapelle left Antwerp, Belgium the first week of October 1947. An impressive ceremony was held, with over 30,000 Belgian citizens attending, along with representatives of the Belgium government and senior Americans. Burials: 7992 Missing in Action: 450 Acres: 57.00
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Grave of Brigadier General Frederick Walker Castle recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Grave of Brigadier General Frederick Walker Castle recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:41:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'48"N - 5°54'4"O
  • He attended the US Military Academy, and after graduating in 1930 as a Second Lieutenant, Engineers, he took Air Corps training at March Field and Kelly Field. He was assigned as a pilot and assistant operations officer with the 17th Pursuit Squadron at Selfridge Field. He resigned in 1934, and took a position with Allied Chemical followed by a period with the Sperry Gyroscope Company, while keeping reserve status with the New York National Guard. Following Pearl Harbor, he re-entered active service in January 1942. He was assigned to Major General Ira Eaker and was posted to London as the 8th Air Force Air Chief of Staff for supply. He was promoted to colonel in 1943, and took command of the 94th Bomb Group. In 1944, he was given command of the 4th Combat Wing, and was promoted to brigadier general. On 24 December 1944, the general headed a strike force of more than 2,000 B-17s and B-24s and 800 fighters against German airfields at Babenhausen on his 30th air mission. Flying with the 487th Bomb Group, as Air Leader, he flew in the copilot's position with pilot Lt. Robert Harriman, their aircraft in the number one position of the lead element. German fighters attacked the formation just south of Liege, Belgium. Two engines on his aircraft were destroyed and caught fire. The radar navigator and tail gunner were wounded; the crew were ordered the crew to bail out. The still loaded craft was piloted away from friendly ground troops when it was again attacked. The fuel tank exploded, and the wing lost. The waist and tail sections separated, and it crashed, detonating the bomb load. The general's Medal of Honor citation read in part: “In order not to endanger friendly troops on the ground below, he refused to jettison his bombs.... His lagging, unescorted aircraft became the target of numerous enemy fighters....Repeated attacks started fires in 2 engines....the bail-out order was given. Without regard for his personal safety he gallantly remained alone at the controls to afford all other crew members an opportunity to escape.... the bomber plunged earthward, carrying Gen. Castle to his death. His intrepidity and willing sacrifice of his life to save members of the crew were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.” He also received the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross with three oak leaf clusters, Air Medal, Legion of Merit, the French and Belgium Croix de Guerre with palm, the Belgian Croix de L'ordre de Leopold II and Russia's Order of Kutuzov. In 1946, Merced Army Air Field was re-designated Castle Field in his honor. The facility became Castle Air Force Base in 1948. In 1981, the nearby Castle Air Museum was opened. The base closed in 1995 and became Castle Airport Aviation and Development Center. Birth 14 Oct 1908 Manila, Capital District, National Capital Region, Philippines Death 24 Dec 1944 (aged 36) Liège, Belgium Burial Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Henri-Chapelle, Arrondissement de Verviers, Liège, Belgium Plot Plot D, Row 13, Grave 53
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:55:44
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'48"N - 5°53'59"O
  • The bronze statue of the Angel of Peace is bestowing the olive branch upon the heroic dead for whom he makes special commendation to the Almighty. At the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium, covering 57 acres, rest 7,992 of United States military dead, most of whom lost their lives during the advance of the U.S. armed forces into Germany. Their headstones are arranged in gentle arcs sweeping across a broad green lawn that slopes gently downhill. A highway passes through the cemetery. West of the highway is an overlook that affords an excellent view of the rolling Belgian countryside, once a battlefield. To the east is the long colonnade that, with the chapel and map room, forms the memorial overlooking the burial area. The chapel is simple, but richly ornamented. In the map room are two maps of military operations, carved in black granite, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of their forces. On the rectangular piers of the colonnade are inscribed the names of 450 missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. The seals of the states and territories are also carved on these piers. The cemetery possesses great military historic significance as it holds fallen Americans of two major efforts, one covering the U.S. First Army's drive in September 1944 through northern France, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg into Germany, and the second covering the Battle of the Bulge. It was from the temporary cemetery at Henri-Chapelle that the first shipments of remains of American war dead were returned to the United States for permanent burial. The repatriation program began on July 27, 1947 at a special ceremony at the cemetery when the disinterment began. The first shipment of 5,600 American war dead from Henri-Chapelle left Antwerp, Belgium the first week of October 1947. An impressive ceremony was held, with over 30,000 Belgian citizens attending, along with representatives of the Belgium government and senior Americans. Burials: 7992 Missing in Action: 450 Acres: 57.00
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:23:04
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'44"N - 5°53'57"O
  • At the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium, covering 57 acres, rest 7,992 of United States military dead, most of whom lost their lives during the advance of the U.S. armed forces into Germany. Their headstones are arranged in gentle arcs sweeping across a broad green lawn that slopes gently downhill. A highway passes through the cemetery. West of the highway is an overlook that affords an excellent view of the rolling Belgian countryside, once a battlefield. To the east is the long colonnade that, with the chapel and map room, forms the memorial overlooking the burial area. The chapel is simple, but richly ornamented. In the map room are two maps of military operations, carved in black granite, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of their forces. On the rectangular piers of the colonnade are inscribed the names of 450 missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. The seals of the states and territories are also carved on these piers. The cemetery possesses great military historic significance as it holds fallen Americans of two major efforts, one covering the U.S. First Army's drive in September 1944 through northern France, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg into Germany, and the second covering the Battle of the Bulge. It was from the temporary cemetery at Henri-Chapelle that the first shipments of remains of American war dead were returned to the United States for permanent burial. The repatriation program began on July 27, 1947 at a special ceremony at the cemetery when the disinterment began. The first shipment of 5,600 American war dead from Henri-Chapelle left Antwerp, Belgium the first week of October 1947. An impressive ceremony was held, with over 30,000 Belgian citizens attending, along with representatives of the Belgium government and senior Americans. Burials: 7992 Missing in Action: 450 Acres: 57.00
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Roses are red
Roses are red
  • Author: DameBoudicca Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-06-17 14:52:13
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'48"N - 5°53'55"O
  • ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved Do not use without permission. At the Henri-Chapelle American war cemetery, Belgium.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
At Henri Chapelle war cemetery
At Henri Chapelle war cemetery
  • Author: DameBoudicca Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-06-17 14:14:24
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'47"N - 5°53'58"O
  • ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved Do not use without permission. Entrance from the road on the one side of this colonnade, the cemetery to the other - the names of the soldiers buried in the cemetery on the pillars. Henri-Chapelle war cemetery has 7,992 America burials (of which 554 are unknown) from the second world war. The place was designed by the Chicago firm Holabird, Root and Burgee and the landscaping was made by Franz Lipp. It was inaugurated in 1945.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Belgian landscape
Belgian landscape
  • Author: DameBoudicca Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-06-17 14:47:07
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'48"N - 5°53'54"O
  • ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved Do not use without permission. Seen from the Henri-Chapelle American war cemetery.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Henri-Chapelle war cemetery
Henri-Chapelle war cemetery
  • Author: DameBoudicca Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-06-17 14:12:23
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'48"N - 5°53'57"O
  • ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved Do not use without permission. Entrance from the road to the left of this colonnade, the cemetery to the right - the names of the soldiers buried in the cemetery on the pillars. Henri-Chapelle war cemetery has 7,992 America burials (of which 554 are unknown) from the second world war. The place was designed by the Chicago firm Holabird, Root and Burgee and the landscaping was made by Franz Lipp. It was inaugurated in 1945.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 11:03:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'49"N - 5°53'53"O
  • At the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium, covering 57 acres, rest 7,992 of United States military dead, most of whom lost their lives during the advance of the U.S. armed forces into Germany. Their headstones are arranged in gentle arcs sweeping across a broad green lawn that slopes gently downhill. A highway passes through the cemetery. West of the highway is an overlook that affords an excellent view of the rolling Belgian countryside, once a battlefield. To the east is the long colonnade that, with the chapel and map room, forms the memorial overlooking the burial area. The chapel is simple, but richly ornamented. In the map room are two maps of military operations, carved in black granite, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of their forces. On the rectangular piers of the colonnade are inscribed the names of 450 missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. The seals of the states and territories are also carved on these piers. The cemetery possesses great military historic significance as it holds fallen Americans of two major efforts, one covering the U.S. First Army's drive in September 1944 through northern France, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg into Germany, and the second covering the Battle of the Bulge. It was from the temporary cemetery at Henri-Chapelle that the first shipments of remains of American war dead were returned to the United States for permanent burial. The repatriation program began on July 27, 1947 at a special ceremony at the cemetery when the disinterment began. The first shipment of 5,600 American war dead from Henri-Chapelle left Antwerp, Belgium the first week of October 1947. An impressive ceremony was held, with over 30,000 Belgian citizens attending, along with representatives of the Belgium government and senior Americans. Burials: 7992 Missing in Action: 450 Acres: 57.00
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Grave of Technician 4th Grade Truman Carol Kimbro recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Grave of Technician 4th Grade Truman Carol Kimbro recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:45:17
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'47"N - 5°54'5"O
  • Truman Kimbro was working as a farm hand in Texas when he enlisted in the United States Army on December 2, 1941. He was sent with his company to Belgium, where in 1944 he was killed while performing his assigned mission under heavy enemy fire. Five months later he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. The citation reads: "On 19 December 1944, as scout, he led a squad assigned to the mission of mining a vital crossroads near Rocherath, Belgium. At the first attempt to reach the objective, he discovered it was occupied by an enemy tank and at least 20 infantrymen. Driven back by withering fire, Technician 4th Grade Kimbro made 2 more attempts to lead his squad to the crossroads but all approaches were covered by intense enemy fire. Although warned by our own infantrymen of the great danger involved, he left his squad in a protected place and, laden with mines, crawled alone toward the crossroads. When nearing his objective he was severely wounded, but he continued to drag himself forward and laid his mines across the road. As he tried to crawl from the objective his body was riddled with rifle and machine gun fire. The mines laid by his act of indomitable courage delayed the advance of enemy armor and prevented the rear of our withdrawing columns from being attacked by the enemy". In further recognition of his valor, a US Army ship, the USAT Sgt Truman Kimbro, was named in his honor. Birth 27 May 1919 Madisonville, Madison County, Texas, USA Death 19 Dec 1944 (aged 25) Liège, Belgium Burial Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Henri-Chapelle, Arrondissement de Verviers, Liège, Belgium Plot Plot F Row 6 Grave 28
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Grave of Brigadier General Frederick Walker Castle recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Grave of Brigadier General Frederick Walker Castle recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:40:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'48"N - 5°54'4"O
  • He attended the US Military Academy, and after graduating in 1930 as a Second Lieutenant, Engineers, he took Air Corps training at March Field and Kelly Field. He was assigned as a pilot and assistant operations officer with the 17th Pursuit Squadron at Selfridge Field. He resigned in 1934, and took a position with Allied Chemical followed by a period with the Sperry Gyroscope Company, while keeping reserve status with the New York National Guard. Following Pearl Harbor, he re-entered active service in January 1942. He was assigned to Major General Ira Eaker and was posted to London as the 8th Air Force Air Chief of Staff for supply. He was promoted to colonel in 1943, and took command of the 94th Bomb Group. In 1944, he was given command of the 4th Combat Wing, and was promoted to brigadier general. On 24 December 1944, the general headed a strike force of more than 2,000 B-17s and B-24s and 800 fighters against German airfields at Babenhausen on his 30th air mission. Flying with the 487th Bomb Group, as Air Leader, he flew in the copilot's position with pilot Lt. Robert Harriman, their aircraft in the number one position of the lead element. German fighters attacked the formation just south of Liege, Belgium. Two engines on his aircraft were destroyed and caught fire. The radar navigator and tail gunner were wounded; the crew were ordered the crew to bail out. The still loaded craft was piloted away from friendly ground troops when it was again attacked. The fuel tank exploded, and the wing lost. The waist and tail sections separated, and it crashed, detonating the bomb load. The general's Medal of Honor citation read in part: “In order not to endanger friendly troops on the ground below, he refused to jettison his bombs.... His lagging, unescorted aircraft became the target of numerous enemy fighters....Repeated attacks started fires in 2 engines....the bail-out order was given. Without regard for his personal safety he gallantly remained alone at the controls to afford all other crew members an opportunity to escape.... the bomber plunged earthward, carrying Gen. Castle to his death. His intrepidity and willing sacrifice of his life to save members of the crew were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.” He also received the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross with three oak leaf clusters, Air Medal, Legion of Merit, the French and Belgium Croix de Guerre with palm, the Belgian Croix de L'ordre de Leopold II and Russia's Order of Kutuzov. In 1946, Merced Army Air Field was re-designated Castle Field in his honor. The facility became Castle Air Force Base in 1948. In 1981, the nearby Castle Air Museum was opened. The base closed in 1995 and became Castle Airport Aviation and Development Center. Birth 14 Oct 1908 Manila, Capital District, National Capital Region, Philippines Death 24 Dec 1944 (aged 36) Liège, Belgium Burial Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Henri-Chapelle, Arrondissement de Verviers, Liège, Belgium Plot Plot D, Row 13, Grave 53
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Grave of a Comrade in Arms Known but to God Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Grave of a Comrade in Arms Known but to God Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:53:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'50"N - 5°53'59"O
  • At the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium, covering 57 acres, rest 7,992 of United States military dead, most of whom lost their lives during the advance of the U.S. armed forces into Germany. Their headstones are arranged in gentle arcs sweeping across a broad green lawn that slopes gently downhill. A highway passes through the cemetery. West of the highway is an overlook that affords an excellent view of the rolling Belgian countryside, once a battlefield. To the east is the long colonnade that, with the chapel and map room, forms the memorial overlooking the burial area. The chapel is simple, but richly ornamented. In the map room are two maps of military operations, carved in black granite, with inscriptions recalling the achievements of their forces. On the rectangular piers of the colonnade are inscribed the names of 450 missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. The seals of the states and territories are also carved on these piers. The cemetery possesses great military historic significance as it holds fallen Americans of two major efforts, one covering the U.S. First Army's drive in September 1944 through northern France, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg into Germany, and the second covering the Battle of the Bulge. It was from the temporary cemetery at Henri-Chapelle that the first shipments of remains of American war dead were returned to the United States for permanent burial. The repatriation program began on July 27, 1947 at a special ceremony at the cemetery when the disinterment began. The first shipment of 5,600 American war dead from Henri-Chapelle left Antwerp, Belgium the first week of October 1947. An impressive ceremony was held, with over 30,000 Belgian citizens attending, along with representatives of the Belgium government and senior Americans. Burials: 7992 Missing in Action: 450 Acres: 57.00
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Grave of Private First Class Francis Xavier McGraw recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Grave of Private First Class Francis Xavier McGraw recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:32:55
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'50"N - 5°54'0"O
  • After completing school, he worked for the Campbell Soup company before enlisting in the Army in February 1942. He was sent overseas with his unit, taking part in combat operations in North Africa and Europe, including taking part in the D-Day invasion in France. In November 1944, Private McGraw was killed while engaged in battle with German Troops. His actions that day are described in the citation for the Medal of Honor that he was posthumously awarded for these events. The citation reads: "He manned a heavy machine gun placed in a foxhole near Schevenhutte, Germany, on 19 November 1944, when the enemy launched a fierce counterattack. Braving an intense hour-long preparatory barrage, he maintained his stand and poured deadly accurate fire into the advancing foot troops until they faltered and came to a halt. The hostile forces brought up a machine gun in an effort to dislodge him but were frustrated when he lifted his gun to an exposed but advantageous position atop a log, courageously stood up in his foxhole and knocked out the enemy weapon. A rocket blasted his gun from position, but he retrieved it and continued firing. He silenced a second machine gun and then made repeated trips over fire-swept terrain to replenish his ammunition supply. Wounded painfully in this dangerous task, he disregarded his injury and hurried back to his post, where his weapon was showered with mud when another rocket barely missed him. In the midst of the battle, with enemy troops taking advantage of his predicament to press forward, he calmly cleaned his gun, put it back into action and drove off the attackers. He continued to fire until his ammunition was expended, when, with a fierce desire to close with the enemy, he picked up a carbine, killed 1 enemy soldier, wounded another and engaged in a desperate firefight with a third until he was mortally wounded by a burst from a machine pistol. The extraordinary heroism and intrepidity displayed by Pvt. McGraw inspired his comrades to great efforts and was a major factor in repulsing the enemy attack." Birth 29 Apr 1918 Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA Death 20 Nov 1944 (aged 26) Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany Burial Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Henri-Chapelle, Arrondissement de Verviers, Liège, Belgium Plot Plot A Row 18 Grave 25
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Grave of Private Francis Xavier McGraw recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
Grave of Private Francis Xavier McGraw recipient of the Medal of Honor Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2013-04-25 10:33:23
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°41'50"N - 5°54'0"O
  • After completing school, he worked for the Campbell Soup company before enlisting in the Army in February 1942. He was sent overseas with his unit, taking part in combat operations in North Africa and Europe, including taking part in the D-Day invasion in France. In November 1944, Private McGraw was killed while engaged in battle with German Troops. His actions that day are described in the citation for the Medal of Honor that he was posthumously awarded for these events. The citation reads: "He manned a heavy machine gun placed in a foxhole near Schevenhutte, Germany, on 19 November 1944, when the enemy launched a fierce counterattack. Braving an intense hour-long preparatory barrage, he maintained his stand and poured deadly accurate fire into the advancing foot troops until they faltered and came to a halt. The hostile forces brought up a machine gun in an effort to dislodge him but were frustrated when he lifted his gun to an exposed but advantageous position atop a log, courageously stood up in his foxhole and knocked out the enemy weapon. A rocket blasted his gun from position, but he retrieved it and continued firing. He silenced a second machine gun and then made repeated trips over fire-swept terrain to replenish his ammunition supply. Wounded painfully in this dangerous task, he disregarded his injury and hurried back to his post, where his weapon was showered with mud when another rocket barely missed him. In the midst of the battle, with enemy troops taking advantage of his predicament to press forward, he calmly cleaned his gun, put it back into action and drove off the attackers. He continued to fire until his ammunition was expended, when, with a fierce desire to close with the enemy, he picked up a carbine, killed 1 enemy soldier, wounded another and engaged in a desperate firefight with a third until he was mortally wounded by a burst from a machine pistol. The extraordinary heroism and intrepidity displayed by Pvt. McGraw inspired his comrades to great efforts and was a major factor in repulsing the enemy attack." Birth 29 Apr 1918 Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA Death 20 Nov 1944 (aged 26) Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany Burial Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial Henri-Chapelle, Arrondissement de Verviers, Liège, Belgium Plot Plot A Row 18 Grave 25
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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