ManyFoto.com: photos from the world.

Getting started:

  1. Select the country.
  2. Find location in the text box
    [ Type in an address or City/locality: ]
  3. If necessary change the search radius.
  4. If necessary you can move the marker on the map.
  5. Start the search with
    [ See the photos ]

Or use:

  1. [ Search in ManyFoto.com by Google ]
Note:
manyfoto.com uses the Flickr API but is not endorsed or certified by Flickr.
How to get to Ligne (Wallonne) Hotel Ligne (Wallonne)

Photos of Ligne, Wallonne

photos found. 59. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:01:16
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Miroir mon beau miroir, dis-moi qui est la plus belle ?
Miroir mon beau miroir, dis-moi qui est la plus belle ?
  • Author: Eric Dereydt Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-04-16 15:48:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'22"N - 3°42'49"O
  • Ulyana Ashurka
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Find the Best Accomodations located to Ligne, Wallonne
  • New deals listed every day
  • FREE cancellation on most rooms!
  • No booking fees, Save money!, Best Price Guaranteed
  • Manage your booking on the go
  • Book last minute without a credit card!
  • Find out more at Booking.com Reviews
Hotel Ligne
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 16:59:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:00:14
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:00:36
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:01:02
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:01:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:01:47
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:01:59
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:02:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:02:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:03:09
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:03:30
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:04:20
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
ca. 1350 - 'Thierry du Chasteler, seigneur de Moulbaix (+ca. 1325) & Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) & Béatrice du Mortagne', Église Saint-Sulpice, Moulbaix, Ath, province of Hainaut, Belgium
  • Author: roelipilami (Roel Renmans) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-28 17:05:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°36'7"N - 3°42'53"O
  • The incised slab of a lord of Moulbaix and his wife, depicts either Thierry du Chasteler (+ca. 1325) and Marie de Harchies, or Guillaume du Chasteler (+1378) and Béatrice du Mortagne. The knight is portrayed wearing typical Northern French/Flemish/Hainaut armour of the 1340s, whilst the slab itself was probably made around 1350, or even some years later: - a tight-fitting bullet-shaped bascinet, attached by vervelles to a camail ending in a point on his breast; - a surcoat with short dagged sleeves, ending very high in front, but below the knees behind; - the hauberk ends pointed in front as well, just as the camail, and has got elbow-length sleeves slit up on the outside (!); - the lower arms probably show the pourpoint/gambeson worn under the hauberk, very small chance it might as well depict plate armour; - the coat-of-plates is dagged at the edge and is made up of horizontal rows of plate with rivets; - the lower limbs have studded cuisses, poleyns, and greaves worn over mail chausses; - the sabatons are made of overlapping plates, the heels covered by the mail chausses with rowel spurs. Note that plate armour for the arms would have definitely been worn by 1350, but wasn't necessarily shown on effigies. Effigies often were made using existing workshop-designs. This style of armour can already be seen in the illuminations of the Romance of Alexander, made in nearby Tournai, or Bruges, from 1338 to 1344. image.ox.ac.uk/show?collection=bodleian&manuscript=ms...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 59. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Back to top