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How to get to Villers-Saint-Ghislain (Wallonne) Hotel Villers-Saint-Ghislain (Wallonne)

Photos of Villers-Saint-Ghislain, Wallonne

photos found. 684. Photos on the current page: 15
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Graves of three soldiers " Known unto God " St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
Graves of three soldiers
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2007-10-26 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'36"O
  • St. Symphorien Military Cemetery was established by the Germans in late August 1914, after the Battle of Mons and the subsequent British retreat from Belgium. It remained in German hands until November 1918 and has the distinction of containing the graves of some of the first and last casualties of the First World War. The site for the cemetery, an artificial mound in the grounds the estate of local landowner Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, was given to the occupying Germans and was used by them for interments of their and Commonwealth dead from the opening weeks of the war. The plan differs from the stark, regular layout of most Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries in that it contains a variety of different trees, shrubs, flowering plants, and landscaping features which, combined, give the effect of an English country garden. At the highest point of elevation in the park, there is a granite obelisk some seven metres high, erected by the Germans in memory of both German and British servicemen killed in the actions near Mons in August 1914, and elsewhere in the cemetery there are further German memorials to officers and men of the Middlesex Regiment (Plot III), Royal Fusiliers and Royal Irish Regiment (Plot VI). At the Armistice, the cemetery contained the graves of 245 German and 188 Commonwealth servicemen, but further graves were brought in later from other burial grounds in the area, so that there are now 229 Commonwealth and 284 German servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The Commonwealth interments are all standard-issue CWGC markers, but the German war graves are marked by headstones in a variety of different styles.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2007-10-26 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'36"O
  • St. Symphorien Military Cemetery was established by the Germans in late August 1914, after the Battle of Mons and the subsequent British retreat from Belgium. It remained in German hands until November 1918 and has the distinction of containing the graves of some of the first and last casualties of the First World War. The site for the cemetery, an artificial mound in the grounds the estate of local landowner Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, was given to the occupying Germans and was used by them for interments of their and Commonwealth dead from the opening weeks of the war. The plan differs from the stark, regular layout of most Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries in that it contains a variety of different trees, shrubs, flowering plants, and landscaping features which, combined, give the effect of an English country garden. At the highest point of elevation in the park, there is a granite obelisk some seven metres high, erected by the Germans in memory of both German and British servicemen killed in the actions near Mons in August 1914, and elsewhere in the cemetery there are further German memorials to officers and men of the Middlesex Regiment (Plot III), Royal Fusiliers and Royal Irish Regiment (Plot VI). At the Armistice, the cemetery contained the graves of 245 German and 188 Commonwealth servicemen, but further graves were brought in later from other burial grounds in the area, so that there are now 229 Commonwealth and 284 German servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The Commonwealth interments are all standard-issue CWGC markers, but the German war graves are marked by headstones in a variety of different styles.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2007-10-26 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'36"O
  • St. Symphorien Military Cemetery was established by the Germans in late August 1914, after the Battle of Mons and the subsequent British retreat from Belgium. It remained in German hands until November 1918 and has the distinction of containing the graves of some of the first and last casualties of the First World War. The site for the cemetery, an artificial mound in the grounds the estate of local landowner Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, was given to the occupying Germans and was used by them for interments of their and Commonwealth dead from the opening weeks of the war. The plan differs from the stark, regular layout of most Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries in that it contains a variety of different trees, shrubs, flowering plants, and landscaping features which, combined, give the effect of an English country garden. At the highest point of elevation in the park, there is a granite obelisk some seven metres high, erected by the Germans in memory of both German and British servicemen killed in the actions near Mons in August 1914, and elsewhere in the cemetery there are further German memorials to officers and men of the Middlesex Regiment (Plot III), Royal Fusiliers and Royal Irish Regiment (Plot VI). At the Armistice, the cemetery contained the graves of 245 German and 188 Commonwealth servicemen, but further graves were brought in later from other burial grounds in the area, so that there are now 229 Commonwealth and 284 German servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The Commonwealth interments are all standard-issue CWGC markers, but the German war graves are marked by headstones in a variety of different styles.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2007-10-26 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'36"O
  • St. Symphorien Military Cemetery was established by the Germans in late August 1914, after the Battle of Mons and the subsequent British retreat from Belgium. It remained in German hands until November 1918 and has the distinction of containing the graves of some of the first and last casualties of the First World War. The site for the cemetery, an artificial mound in the grounds the estate of local landowner Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, was given to the occupying Germans and was used by them for interments of their and Commonwealth dead from the opening weeks of the war. The plan differs from the stark, regular layout of most Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries in that it contains a variety of different trees, shrubs, flowering plants, and landscaping features which, combined, give the effect of an English country garden. At the highest point of elevation in the park, there is a granite obelisk some seven metres high, erected by the Germans in memory of both German and British servicemen killed in the actions near Mons in August 1914, and elsewhere in the cemetery there are further German memorials to officers and men of the Middlesex Regiment (Plot III), Royal Fusiliers and Royal Irish Regiment (Plot VI). At the Armistice, the cemetery contained the graves of 245 German and 188 Commonwealth servicemen, but further graves were brought in later from other burial grounds in the area, so that there are now 229 Commonwealth and 284 German servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The Commonwealth interments are all standard-issue CWGC markers, but the German war graves are marked by headstones in a variety of different styles.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2007-10-26 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'36"O
  • St. Symphorien Military Cemetery was established by the Germans in late August 1914, after the Battle of Mons and the subsequent British retreat from Belgium. It remained in German hands until November 1918 and has the distinction of containing the graves of some of the first and last casualties of the First World War. The site for the cemetery, an artificial mound in the grounds the estate of local landowner Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, was given to the occupying Germans and was used by them for interments of their and Commonwealth dead from the opening weeks of the war. The plan differs from the stark, regular layout of most Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries in that it contains a variety of different trees, shrubs, flowering plants, and landscaping features which, combined, give the effect of an English country garden. At the highest point of elevation in the park, there is a granite obelisk some seven metres high, erected by the Germans in memory of both German and British servicemen killed in the actions near Mons in August 1914, and elsewhere in the cemetery there are further German memorials to officers and men of the Middlesex Regiment (Plot III), Royal Fusiliers and Royal Irish Regiment (Plot VI). At the Armistice, the cemetery contained the graves of 245 German and 188 Commonwealth servicemen, but further graves were brought in later from other burial grounds in the area, so that there are now 229 Commonwealth and 284 German servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The Commonwealth interments are all standard-issue CWGC markers, but the German war graves are marked by headstones in a variety of different styles.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2007-10-26 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'36"O
  • St. Symphorien Military Cemetery was established by the Germans in late August 1914, after the Battle of Mons and the subsequent British retreat from Belgium. It remained in German hands until November 1918 and has the distinction of containing the graves of some of the first and last casualties of the First World War. The site for the cemetery, an artificial mound in the grounds the estate of local landowner Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, was given to the occupying Germans and was used by them for interments of their and Commonwealth dead from the opening weeks of the war. The plan differs from the stark, regular layout of most Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries in that it contains a variety of different trees, shrubs, flowering plants, and landscaping features which, combined, give the effect of an English country garden. At the highest point of elevation in the park, there is a granite obelisk some seven metres high, erected by the Germans in memory of both German and British servicemen killed in the actions near Mons in August 1914, and elsewhere in the cemetery there are further German memorials to officers and men of the Middlesex Regiment (Plot III), Royal Fusiliers and Royal Irish Regiment (Plot VI). At the Armistice, the cemetery contained the graves of 245 German and 188 Commonwealth servicemen, but further graves were brought in later from other burial grounds in the area, so that there are now 229 Commonwealth and 284 German servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The Commonwealth interments are all standard-issue CWGC markers, but the German war graves are marked by headstones in a variety of different styles.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
St Symphorien Military Cemetery Mons Belgium
  • Author: davidseall Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2007-10-26 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'36"O
  • St. Symphorien Military Cemetery was established by the Germans in late August 1914, after the Battle of Mons and the subsequent British retreat from Belgium. It remained in German hands until November 1918 and has the distinction of containing the graves of some of the first and last casualties of the First World War. The site for the cemetery, an artificial mound in the grounds the estate of local landowner Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, was given to the occupying Germans and was used by them for interments of their and Commonwealth dead from the opening weeks of the war. The plan differs from the stark, regular layout of most Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries in that it contains a variety of different trees, shrubs, flowering plants, and landscaping features which, combined, give the effect of an English country garden. At the highest point of elevation in the park, there is a granite obelisk some seven metres high, erected by the Germans in memory of both German and British servicemen killed in the actions near Mons in August 1914, and elsewhere in the cemetery there are further German memorials to officers and men of the Middlesex Regiment (Plot III), Royal Fusiliers and Royal Irish Regiment (Plot VI). At the Armistice, the cemetery contained the graves of 245 German and 188 Commonwealth servicemen, but further graves were brought in later from other burial grounds in the area, so that there are now 229 Commonwealth and 284 German servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. The Commonwealth interments are all standard-issue CWGC markers, but the German war graves are marked by headstones in a variety of different styles.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Cemetery in rain
Cemetery in rain
  • Author: DameBoudicca Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2014-06-04 16:42:02
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'39"O
  • ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved Do not use without permission. At St. Symphorien military cemetery from the First World War. This cemetery was initially founded by the German army, for the German and British men who were killed at the Battle of Mons (August 1914). This was the condition of the original landowner, Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, that the Commonwealth soldiers should be treated with the same respect as the Germans. The cemetery was inaugurated in 1917, but also includes graves from the last days of the war - which is why the cemetery have the graves both of what is believed to be the first British soldier killed in the war (private John Parr) and the last (George Ellison and George Price, a Canadian). After the armistice the cemetery was turned over to the Commonwealth Grave Cemetery Commission. The cemetery includes 229 Commonwealth burials, and 284 German. Of this total 105 remain unidentified.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Mons, Belgium
Mons, Belgium
  • Author: russthebiker Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-01 16:36:06
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°26'9"N - 4°0'41"O
  • 80 years ago today, the 10th May Germany invaded Belgium, Luxembourg, and Holland For many families it was to be the start of an unknown horror, many would never see their families again, for those that did it would be 5 years before they returned A few months ago, my younger brother and I had a wander around Europe on our Motorcycles , he wanted me to show him where my Grandfather visited on his 1914-1919 all inclusive package tour with the 112 London Foot and Mouth Regiment, we clocked a few miles and visited many other interesting places where history was made, and paid our respects, and gave thanks for the freedom we now enjoy, one afternoon, after visiting Mons I took my Brother to Saint Symphorium Cemetery, I always find it a moving place to visit , as here lie the young men who faced a much larger army, and did not back down! as we were about to leave a car pulled up and an elderly white haired gentleman asked us if we would come back to his house and take a drink with him, now my brother had arranged something for later, but I said cancel it, we are being asked for a reason, I travel a great deal, usually on my own and many times have been invited by kind people into their homes, and made lifelong friends. We followed the car back a short distance and Christian bade us enter his lovely home, and introduced us to his wife Marie Claire, she still has a sparkle in her eyes, but could not speak more than a few words of English, my French is rubbish, but Christian sat us down and opened a bottle of low alcohol wine for us ( I do not drink and my brother cannot) he told us in his schoolboy English along with many french words that we translated that they had been married nearly 70 years, they were both born in the village adjoining the cemetery and knew each others families as children, Both of their fathers did military service together and he showed us his Fathers Album from the 11th Regiment of Artillery ( anti aircraft) , When Germany started their invasion of Poland, Christians Father, who as a child had known the horrors of the great war, sat down at the dinner table one evening and told the family that soon the Nazis would move South into Belgium and it was likely to last 5 years, changes were made and plans put into action, As the Nazis moved nearer Christians mother along with many others moved south into France to escape the bombing and violence they carried their possessions as best they could and tramped day and night sleeping wherever they found shelter , when they got to Lens, the Germans overran them and met the B.E.F. , he described the Nazi planes with mitrailettes ( machine guns ?) diving low and firing on the helpless civilians on the roads, as they ran for the ditches, this scared little 5 year old boy, was grabbed by a British Tommy who took of his own safety helmet and placed it over Christians head, and sheltered him with his body, by now he was crying remembering the fear, and the bravery and kindness of that young unnamed soldier, soon trapped in the middle of the battle, they had no choice but to return and try to repair the damage caused by the Nazis and live under the thugs for 5 years, now both families worked on the local farms, but when the Nazis moved South Christians father, his brother and his wife's father were swiftly called up and made ready, they were based in the area on an anti aircraft gun, but soon the vile nazis overran Belgium, and Christians father was imprisoned like so many others, before his father was taken away to a labour camp, his mother managed to get him close enough to the vehicles to speak for a few minutes, his father produced a small clockwork motor car and said to him, I will keep this with me to remind me of you, and when next we meet you will know me by the car in my hand, shortly afterwards they were taken away, Christians father and brother ended up working on a farm in Bavaria in the forest and survived the war, when he was returned post war, Christian was waiting to meet him along with thousands of other wives and children, his father came up and put his hand in his pocket and produced the now battered toy car, he had kept his promise to Christian, understandably he was in tears as he held it out, he said when I hold this I am with my Father again, his father is Buried in the Cemetery nearby. we were Honoured to Meet Christian and Marie Claire, and on our long Journey South that evening to Arras that small boy was in our minds, oddly my Father is only a few years older, perhaps I can arrange for them to meet so look at the pictures I took with a rubbish camera phone, and see the love in their eyes, they have a large loving family, and look at that small motor car and imagine how much emotion that holds and thanks to that young Tommy whoever he was for looking after a frightened five year old child, he was a Lion against an Army of weak minded thugs, we raised our glasses to him and to freedom
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Mons, Belgium
Mons, Belgium
  • Author: russthebiker Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-01 17:08:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°26'10"N - 4°0'40"O
  • 80 years ago today, the 10th May Germany invaded Belgium, Luxembourg, and Holland For many families it was to be the start of an unknown horror, many would never see their families again, for those that did it would be 5 years before they returned A few months ago, my younger brother and I had a wander around Europe on our Motorcycles , he wanted me to show him where my Grandfather visited on his 1914-1919 all inclusive package tour with the 112 London Foot and Mouth Regiment, we clocked a few miles and visited many other interesting places where history was made, and paid our respects, and gave thanks for the freedom we now enjoy, one afternoon, after visiting Mons I took my Brother to Saint Symphorium Cemetery, I always find it a moving place to visit , as here lie the young men who faced a much larger army, and did not back down! as we were about to leave a car pulled up and an elderly white haired gentleman asked us if we would come back to his house and take a drink with him, now my brother had arranged something for later, but I said cancel it, we are being asked for a reason, I travel a great deal, usually on my own and many times have been invited by kind people into their homes, and made lifelong friends. We followed the car back a short distance and Christian bade us enter his lovely home, and introduced us to his wife Marie Claire, she still has a sparkle in her eyes, but could not speak more than a few words of English, my French is rubbish, but Christian sat us down and opened a bottle of low alcohol wine for us ( I do not drink and my brother cannot) he told us in his schoolboy English along with many french words that we translated that they had been married nearly 70 years, they were both born in the village adjoining the cemetery and knew each others families as children, Both of their fathers did military service together and he showed us his Fathers Album from the 11th Regiment of Artillery ( anti aircraft) , When Germany started their invasion of Poland, Christians Father, who as a child had known the horrors of the great war, sat down at the dinner table one evening and told the family that soon the Nazis would move South into Belgium and it was likely to last 5 years, changes were made and plans put into action, As the Nazis moved nearer Christians mother along with many others moved south into France to escape the bombing and violence they carried their possessions as best they could and tramped day and night sleeping wherever they found shelter , when they got to Lens, the Germans overran them and met the B.E.F. , he described the Nazi planes with mitrailettes ( machine guns ?) diving low and firing on the helpless civilians on the roads, as they ran for the ditches, this scared little 5 year old boy, was grabbed by a British Tommy who took of his own safety helmet and placed it over Christians head, and sheltered him with his body, by now he was crying remembering the fear, and the bravery and kindness of that young unnamed soldier, soon trapped in the middle of the battle, they had no choice but to return and try to repair the damage caused by the Nazis and live under the thugs for 5 years, now both families worked on the local farms, but when the Nazis moved South Christians father, his brother and his wife's father were swiftly called up and made ready, they were based in the area on an anti aircraft gun, but soon the vile nazis overran Belgium, and Christians father was imprisoned like so many others, before his father was taken away to a labour camp, his mother managed to get him close enough to the vehicles to speak for a few minutes, his father produced a small clockwork motor car and said to him, I will keep this with me to remind me of you, and when next we meet you will know me by the car in my hand, shortly afterwards they were taken away, Christians father and brother ended up working on a farm in Bavaria in the forest and survived the war, when he was returned post war, Christian was waiting to meet him along with thousands of other wives and children, his father came up and put his hand in his pocket and produced the now battered toy car, he had kept his promise to Christian, understandably he was in tears as he held it out, he said when I hold this I am with my Father again, his father is Buried in the Cemetery nearby. we were Honoured to Meet Christian and Marie Claire, and on our long Journey South that evening to Arras that small boy was in our minds, oddly my Father is only a few years older, perhaps I can arrange for them to meet so look at the pictures I took with a rubbish camera phone, and see the love in their eyes, they have a large loving family, and look at that small motor car and imagine how much emotion that holds and thanks to that young Tommy whoever he was for looking after a frightened five year old child, he was a Lion against an Army of weak minded thugs, we raised our glasses to him and to freedom
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Mons, Belgium
Mons, Belgium
  • Author: russthebiker Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-01 17:19:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°26'9"N - 4°0'40"O
  • 80 years ago today, the 10th May Germany invaded Belgium, Luxembourg, and Holland For many families it was to be the start of an unknown horror, many would never see their families again, for those that did it would be 5 years before they returned A few months ago, my younger brother and I had a wander around Europe on our Motorcycles , he wanted me to show him where my Grandfather visited on his 1914-1919 all inclusive package tour with the 112 London Foot and Mouth Regiment, we clocked a few miles and visited many other interesting places where history was made, and paid our respects, and gave thanks for the freedom we now enjoy, one afternoon, after visiting Mons I took my Brother to Saint Symphorium Cemetery, I always find it a moving place to visit , as here lie the young men who faced a much larger army, and did not back down! as we were about to leave a car pulled up and an elderly white haired gentleman asked us if we would come back to his house and take a drink with him, now my brother had arranged something for later, but I said cancel it, we are being asked for a reason, I travel a great deal, usually on my own and many times have been invited by kind people into their homes, and made lifelong friends. We followed the car back a short distance and Christian bade us enter his lovely home, and introduced us to his wife Marie Claire, she still has a sparkle in her eyes, but could not speak more than a few words of English, my French is rubbish, but Christian sat us down and opened a bottle of low alcohol wine for us ( I do not drink and my brother cannot) he told us in his schoolboy English along with many french words that we translated that they had been married nearly 70 years, they were both born in the village adjoining the cemetery and knew each others families as children, Both of their fathers did military service together and he showed us his Fathers Album from the 11th Regiment of Artillery ( anti aircraft) , When Germany started their invasion of Poland, Christians Father, who as a child had known the horrors of the great war, sat down at the dinner table one evening and told the family that soon the Nazis would move South into Belgium and it was likely to last 5 years, changes were made and plans put into action, As the Nazis moved nearer Christians mother along with many others moved south into France to escape the bombing and violence they carried their possessions as best they could and tramped day and night sleeping wherever they found shelter , when they got to Lens, the Germans overran them and met the B.E.F. , he described the Nazi planes with mitrailettes ( machine guns ?) diving low and firing on the helpless civilians on the roads, as they ran for the ditches, this scared little 5 year old boy, was grabbed by a British Tommy who took of his own safety helmet and placed it over Christians head, and sheltered him with his body, by now he was crying remembering the fear, and the bravery and kindness of that young unnamed soldier, soon trapped in the middle of the battle, they had no choice but to return and try to repair the damage caused by the Nazis and live under the thugs for 5 years, now both families worked on the local farms, but when the Nazis moved South Christians father, his brother and his wife's father were swiftly called up and made ready, they were based in the area on an anti aircraft gun, but soon the vile nazis overran Belgium, and Christians father was imprisoned like so many others, before his father was taken away to a labour camp, his mother managed to get him close enough to the vehicles to speak for a few minutes, his father produced a small clockwork motor car and said to him, I will keep this with me to remind me of you, and when next we meet you will know me by the car in my hand, shortly afterwards they were taken away, Christians father and brother ended up working on a farm in Bavaria in the forest and survived the war, when he was returned post war, Christian was waiting to meet him along with thousands of other wives and children, his father came up and put his hand in his pocket and produced the now battered toy car, he had kept his promise to Christian, understandably he was in tears as he held it out, he said when I hold this I am with my Father again, his father is Buried in the Cemetery nearby. we were Honoured to Meet Christian and Marie Claire, and on our long Journey South that evening to Arras that small boy was in our minds, oddly my Father is only a few years older, perhaps I can arrange for them to meet so look at the pictures I took with a rubbish camera phone, and see the love in their eyes, they have a large loving family, and look at that small motor car and imagine how much emotion that holds and thanks to that young Tommy whoever he was for looking after a frightened five year old child, he was a Lion against an Army of weak minded thugs, we raised our glasses to him and to freedom
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
20181110_094950
20181110_094950
  • Author: greentool2002 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-24 06:14:49
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'55"N - 4°0'37"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
20181110_095834
20181110_095834
  • Author: greentool2002 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-24 06:14:49
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'55"N - 4°0'37"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
DSC_0672
DSC_0672
  • Author: greentool2002 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-11-10 10:11:19
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'55"N - 4°0'37"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
20181110_101201
20181110_101201
  • Author: greentool2002 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-11-10 10:12:01
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 50°25'56"N - 4°0'38"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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