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How to get to Willebroek (Flamande) Hotel Willebroek (Flamande)

Photos of Willebroek, Flamande

photos found. 3869. Photos on the current page: 15
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Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:14:20
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:49:07
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 11:15:04
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:10:43
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:11:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:11:32
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:11:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:12:53
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:13:12
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk Execution Post face
Fort Breendonk Execution Post face
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 11:08:46
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk Execution Post Faces
Fort Breendonk Execution Post Faces
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 11:10:10
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:08:44
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:09:39
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 10:01:39
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fort Breendonk
Fort Breendonk
  • Author: NottsExMiner Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-02 09:53:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 51°3'25"N - 4°20'29"O
  • Fort Breendonk was originally built for the Belgian army between 1906-13 as part of the second ring of defenses of the National Redoubt protecting the important port-city of Antwerp During World War II, the fort was requisitioned by the Germans as a prison camp for detaining Belgian political dissidents, captured resistance members and Jews. The regime upheld in Breendonk was similar to that of a concentration camp. The prisoners were subjected to forced labor, severe rations, and daily brutalities, which led to the death of at least 98 prisoners. These horrible conditions were partially a result of the high guards/prisoners ratio, which stood at 1 guard for every 10 prisoners. These guards consisted of both German and Flemish SS personal, under which the notorious Wyss and De Bodt. Starting in November 1942 an additional 164 prisoners were shot and from May 1943 another 21 hung. These hardening circumstances paralleled the increasing resistance against the Nazi regime in Belgium. The increased and hardening resistance in Belgium, in 1942 led to the incorporation of a torture chamber in the camp for ‘sharpened questioning’ of detainees. On September 4, 1944, the fort is ‘liberated’ by British troops. At this point, however, the fort was already completely empty. The last convoy of prisoners had been deported to Germany on the August 30, and the guards subsequently had disappeared. After liberation, the fort was used as a prison for collaborators and is known as Breendonk II. These prisoners suffer excessive retribution by guards such as the notorious ‘aunt Jeanne’, Jeanne Hoekmans, who shaved the heads of female collaborators, stripped them naked, and drew swastikas on their breasts. It is also unclear how many collaborators were killed in the fort during this period. In 1947 Fort Breendonk was declared to be a national memorial, recognizing the suffering and cruelty that had been inflicted on Belgian prisoners during World War II. The fort is now a well-preserved example of the prison camps operated by Nazi Germany and a national museum.
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