ManyFoto.com: photos from the world.

Getting started:

  1. Select the country.
  2. Find location in the text box
    [ Type in an address or City/locality: ]
  3. If necessary change the search radius.
  4. If necessary you can move the marker on the map.
  5. Start the search with
    [ See the photos ]

Or use:

  1. [ Search in ManyFoto.com by Google ]
Note:
manyfoto.com uses the Flickr API but is not endorsed or certified by Flickr.
How to get to Dinkelsbühl (Bayern) Hotel Dinkelsbühl (Bayern)

Photos of Dinkelsbühl, Bayern

photos found. 2001. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Kåre Odén Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-31 14:54:14
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'12"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Fay2603 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-14 02:00:27
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'1"N - 10°19'3"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Find the Best Accomodations located to Dinkelsbühl, Bayern
  • New deals listed every day
  • FREE cancellation on most rooms!
  • No booking fees, Save money!, Best Price Guaranteed
  • Manage your booking on the go
  • Book last minute without a credit card!
  • Find out more at Booking.com Reviews
Hotel Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:40
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:39
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:39
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:42
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:42
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:42
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:44
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • Dinkelsbühl ist eine Stadt im Landkreis Ansbach in Mittelfranken. Heute ist die Stadt aufgrund des besonders gut erhaltenen spätmittelalterlichen Stadtbildes ein bedeutender Tourismusort an der Romantischen Straße. Dinkelsbühl is a historic town in Central Franconia, a region of Germany that is now part of the state of Bavaria, in southern Germany. Dinkelsbühl is a former Free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire. In local government terms, Dinkelsbühl lies near the western edge of the Landkreis (or local government district) of district of Ansbach, north of Aalen. Dinkelsbühl lies on the northern part of the Romantic Road, and is one of three particularly striking historic towns on the northern part of the route, the others being Rothenburg ob der Tauber and Nördlingen. Fortified by Emperor Henry V, in 1305 Dinkelsbühl received the same municipal rights as Ulm, and in 1351 was raised to the position of a Free Imperial City. Its municipal code, the Dinkelsbühler Recht, published in 1536, and revised in 1738, contained a very extensive collection of public and private laws. During the Protestant Reformation, Dinkelsbühl was notable for being – eventually along only with Ravensburg, Augsburg and Biberach an der Riß — a Bi-confessional (i.e. roughly equal numbers of Roman Catholics and Protestant citizens, with equal rights) Imperial City (German: Paritätische Reichsstadt) where the Peace of Westphalia caused the establishment of a joint Catholic–Protestant government and administrative system, with equality offices (German: Gleichberechtigung) and a precise and equal distribution between Catholic and Protestant civic officials. This status ended in 1802, when these cities were annexed by the Kingdom of Bavaria. Around 1534 the majority of the population of Dinkelsbühl became Protestant. Every summer Dinkelsbühl celebrates the city's surrender to Swedish Troops in 1632 during the Thirty Years' War. This reenactment is played out by many of the town's residents. It features an array of Swedish troops attacking the city gate and children dressed in traditional garb coming to witness the event. Paper cones full of chocolate and candy are given as gifts to children. This historical event is called the "Kinderzeche" and can in some aspects be compared with the "Meistertrunk" in Rothenburg. The name is derived from the two German words for "child" and "the bill for food and drink in an inn", and is called such because of the legend that a child saved the town from massacre by the Swedish Troops during the surrender. The legend tells that when the Swedish army besieged the town, a teenage girl took the children to the Swedish general to beg for mercy. The Swedish general had recently lost his young son to illness, and a boy who approached him so closely resembled his own son that he decided to spare the town.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:43
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • Dinkelsbühl ist eine Stadt im Landkreis Ansbach in Mittelfranken. Heute ist die Stadt aufgrund des besonders gut erhaltenen spätmittelalterlichen Stadtbildes ein bedeutender Tourismusort an der Romantischen Straße. Dinkelsbühl is a historic town in Central Franconia, a region of Germany that is now part of the state of Bavaria, in southern Germany. Dinkelsbühl is a former Free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire. In local government terms, Dinkelsbühl lies near the western edge of the Landkreis (or local government district) of district of Ansbach, north of Aalen. Dinkelsbühl lies on the northern part of the Romantic Road, and is one of three particularly striking historic towns on the northern part of the route, the others being Rothenburg ob der Tauber and Nördlingen. Fortified by Emperor Henry V, in 1305 Dinkelsbühl received the same municipal rights as Ulm, and in 1351 was raised to the position of a Free Imperial City. Its municipal code, the Dinkelsbühler Recht, published in 1536, and revised in 1738, contained a very extensive collection of public and private laws. During the Protestant Reformation, Dinkelsbühl was notable for being – eventually along only with Ravensburg, Augsburg and Biberach an der Riß — a Bi-confessional (i.e. roughly equal numbers of Roman Catholics and Protestant citizens, with equal rights) Imperial City (German: Paritätische Reichsstadt) where the Peace of Westphalia caused the establishment of a joint Catholic–Protestant government and administrative system, with equality offices (German: Gleichberechtigung) and a precise and equal distribution between Catholic and Protestant civic officials. This status ended in 1802, when these cities were annexed by the Kingdom of Bavaria. Around 1534 the majority of the population of Dinkelsbühl became Protestant. Every summer Dinkelsbühl celebrates the city's surrender to Swedish Troops in 1632 during the Thirty Years' War. This reenactment is played out by many of the town's residents. It features an array of Swedish troops attacking the city gate and children dressed in traditional garb coming to witness the event. Paper cones full of chocolate and candy are given as gifts to children. This historical event is called the "Kinderzeche" and can in some aspects be compared with the "Meistertrunk" in Rothenburg. The name is derived from the two German words for "child" and "the bill for food and drink in an inn", and is called such because of the legend that a child saved the town from massacre by the Swedish Troops during the surrender. The legend tells that when the Swedish army besieged the town, a teenage girl took the children to the Swedish general to beg for mercy. The Swedish general had recently lost his young son to illness, and a boy who approached him so closely resembled his own son that he decided to spare the town.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 06:45:44
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • Dinkelsbühl ist eine Stadt im Landkreis Ansbach in Mittelfranken. Heute ist die Stadt aufgrund des besonders gut erhaltenen spätmittelalterlichen Stadtbildes ein bedeutender Tourismusort an der Romantischen Straße. Dinkelsbühl is a historic town in Central Franconia, a region of Germany that is now part of the state of Bavaria, in southern Germany. Dinkelsbühl is a former Free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire. In local government terms, Dinkelsbühl lies near the western edge of the Landkreis (or local government district) of district of Ansbach, north of Aalen. Dinkelsbühl lies on the northern part of the Romantic Road, and is one of three particularly striking historic towns on the northern part of the route, the others being Rothenburg ob der Tauber and Nördlingen. Fortified by Emperor Henry V, in 1305 Dinkelsbühl received the same municipal rights as Ulm, and in 1351 was raised to the position of a Free Imperial City. Its municipal code, the Dinkelsbühler Recht, published in 1536, and revised in 1738, contained a very extensive collection of public and private laws. During the Protestant Reformation, Dinkelsbühl was notable for being – eventually along only with Ravensburg, Augsburg and Biberach an der Riß — a Bi-confessional (i.e. roughly equal numbers of Roman Catholics and Protestant citizens, with equal rights) Imperial City (German: Paritätische Reichsstadt) where the Peace of Westphalia caused the establishment of a joint Catholic–Protestant government and administrative system, with equality offices (German: Gleichberechtigung) and a precise and equal distribution between Catholic and Protestant civic officials. This status ended in 1802, when these cities were annexed by the Kingdom of Bavaria. Around 1534 the majority of the population of Dinkelsbühl became Protestant. Every summer Dinkelsbühl celebrates the city's surrender to Swedish Troops in 1632 during the Thirty Years' War. This reenactment is played out by many of the town's residents. It features an array of Swedish troops attacking the city gate and children dressed in traditional garb coming to witness the event. Paper cones full of chocolate and candy are given as gifts to children. This historical event is called the "Kinderzeche" and can in some aspects be compared with the "Meistertrunk" in Rothenburg. The name is derived from the two German words for "child" and "the bill for food and drink in an inn", and is called such because of the legend that a child saved the town from massacre by the Swedish Troops during the surrender. The legend tells that when the Swedish army besieged the town, a teenage girl took the children to the Swedish general to beg for mercy. The Swedish general had recently lost his young son to illness, and a boy who approached him so closely resembled his own son that he decided to spare the town.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Dinkelsbuehl
Dinkelsbuehl
  • Author: Vid Pogacnik Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-07 16:28:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'5"N - 10°19'11"O
  • Dinkelsbühl is a nice medieval town in Germany, lying by the Romantische Strasse. The town luckilly escaped destruction during the 30-years war and also during the World War II. Photo: Jasmina Pogačnik.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
One of the nicest streets in Dinkelsbühl
One of the nicest streets in Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
Dinkelsbühl
  • Author: Flo 365 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2011-08-14 11:53:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 49°4'9"N - 10°19'8"O
  • Links im Bild: Das Wörnitztor Dinkelsbühl ist eine Stadt im Landkreis Ansbach in Mittelfranken. Heute ist die Stadt aufgrund des besonders gut erhaltenen spätmittelalterlichen Stadtbildes ein bedeutender Tourismusort an der Romantischen Straße. Seit 1998 ist Dinkelsbühl Große Kreisstadt und seit 2013 Mitglied im Bayerischen Städtetag. Um 1130 erfolgte die erste Stadtanlage von Dinkelsbühl, die heute als Kernstadt oder innere Altstadt bezeichnet wird. Sie wurde als Stützpunkt und Bindeglied zwischen den staufischen Hausgütern ausgebaut, als die Staufer und Welfen um die deutsche Krone gerungen haben. Man geht davon aus, dass sich an der Wörnitzfurt eine Vorgängersiedlung um einen karolingischen Königshof, gegründet um 730, befunden hat. Das umliegende Keuperwaldgebiet wurde, so schließt man aus den Ortsnamensendungen, in der späteren fränkischen Landnahme im 8. Jahrhundert besiedelt. Die wegen der günstigeren Verteidigung eiförmige damalige Stadtmauer ist deutlich im heutigen Stadtbild zu erkennen. Die sie begrenzenden Straßenzüge der Spitalgasse, der Unteren Schmiedgasse, der Föhrenberggasse und der Wethgasse verlaufen vor dem staufischen Stadtgraben, der der Ummauerung vorgelagert war. Die Stadtmauer selbst verlief innerhalb der ersten Hausblöcke, u. a. zwischen Unterer Schmiedgasse und Elsasser Gasse sowie zwischen Föhrenberggasse und Lange Gasse, wie man aus den Grundstücksgrenzen, den Hofstättenbreiten und der Bausubstanz (die staufische Stadtmauer ist Teil mancher Hauswände) sowie den archäologischen Befunden ablesen kann. Im Gegensatz zu den meisten Stadtanlagen des 13. Jahrhunderts (vgl. beispielsweise Rothenburg) gibt es im gewachsenen, nicht planmäßig angelegten Dinkelsbühl keinen zentralen, rechteckigen Marktplatz, sondern Marktstraßen mit zum Teil trichterförmigen Erweiterungen wie am Weinmarkt, der sich auf 36 m verbreitert. Die Straßen waren später in einzelnen Abschnitten dem Handel mit unterschiedlichen Produkten vorbehalten. Neben dem Weinmarkt war im Bereich der inneren Altstadt die heutige Segringer Straße in Brettermarkt, Hafenmarkt, Brotmarkt und Schmalzmarkt unterteilt, hinter dem Neuen Rathaus war der Schweinemarkt. Der heutige Altrathausplatz war der Viehmarkt und die gesamte innere Nördlinger Straße der Ledermarkt. Die Stauferstadt erwies sich als funktional. Sie war bereits bei der im 14. Jahrhundert vorgenommenen Stadterweiterung so leistungsfähig, dass keine Verschiebung des Stadtmittelpunkts und wirtschaftlichen Zentrums vorgenommen werden musste. Mit dem 1499 abgeschlossenen Bau der St.-Georgs-Kirche entstand das dominante Zeichen kultureller Blüte der Stadt. Das bauliche Erscheinungsbild der Altstadt hat sich seither nicht grundlegend verändert. In der wirtschaftlichen Blütezeit der Stadt Dinkelsbühl, dem 14. und 15. Jahrhundert, wurden jenseits der staufischen Stadttore Vorstädte angelegt, wahrscheinlich in der Reihenfolge Rothenburger, Segringer, Wörnitzvorstadt und Nördlinger Vorstadt. Ab 1372 erhielt die Altstadt von Dinkelsbühl mit dem Bau der Stadtmauer ihre heutige Gestalt; die Wörnitzvorstadt wurde dabei mit Palisaden gesichert, da ihr die umgebenden Wasserflächen einen natürlichen Schutz boten. Die Rothenburger und Nördlinger Vorstadt wurden zur Hauptachse mit einer parallelen Gasse erschlossen, im Norden durch die Bauhofgasse und im Süden durch die Lange Gasse. Eng und fast ohne Freiflächen ist die Bebauung in der Wörnitzvorstadt. In der Rothenburger Vorstadt war das feuergefährliche Gewerbe (Schmiede) ansässig. Östlich der Schmiedgassen des Rothenburger Viertels liegt als eigener Komplex der Spitalhof. Die bäuerliche Nördlinger Vorstadt war wegen des Wassers im Stadtmühlgraben auch von Färbern und Gerbern besiedelt. In den locker bebauten Hanglagen der Rothenburger, Segringer und Nördlinger Vorstadt siedelten u. a. die Tuchmacher und Weber, die auf Freiflächen für ihre Trockenrahmen angewiesen waren. Außerdem standen hier das Kloster der Kapuziner sowie der Deutschordenshof; die verbliebenen Freiflächen wurden von Obstwiesen und Pferdeweiden eingenommen. Das Karmelitenkloster befand sich dagegen auf dem ältesten Kirchenplatz beim zentral gelegenen karolingischen Königshof am Ledermarkt. Anders als bei den meisten historischen Städten erfolgten alle Stadterweiterungen des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts in Dinkelsbühl außerhalb der Altstadt. Diese wird von einer vollständigen Ummauerung umschlossen, an die sich im Westen und Süden der im Blasensandstein ausgehobene Innere Stadtgraben anschließt. Im Norden liegen vor ihr der Hippenweiher und Rothenburger Weiher mit dem Äußeren Stadtgraben und im Osten der Stadtmühlgraben mit den Überflutungsauen der Wörnitz. Die Silhouette der Stadt von der Wörnitzseite aus gesehen ist wohl die markanteste Ansicht der Stadt und seit Matthäus Merians Stich von 1643 nachgeahmt. Die Gliederung der Altstadt in eine innere Altstadt und einen Erweiterungsbereich erkennt man insbesondere an der Breite der Häuserfronten der sogenannten Hofstätten. Diese misst am Marktplatz etwa 15 m, im weiteren Bereich der Kernstadt 12,5 m und in den Vorstädten 10 m oder weniger. Das Münster St. Georg beherrscht optisch die ganze Stadt und kann als Dominanz erster Ordnung bezeichnet werden. Dominanten zweiter Ordnung sind die vier spätmittelalterlichen Tortürme, die die Altstadtteile und alle anderen öffentlichen Bauten überragen. Mit Ausnahme des Nördlinger Tors sind sie nur einspurig befahrbar, was die Erhaltung des Altstadtambientes in Konflikt mit dem motorisierten Individualverkehr bringt. Das Gliederungssystem der inneren Altstadt, insbesondere die Hauptstraßenführung parallel sowie rechtwinklig zur Wörnitz und die parallel verlaufender Seitengassen, wurde beibehalten. Dasselbe gilt für die Abstände der Erschließungseinheiten, die jeweils genau die Länge haben, die zuvor der Entfernung der alten Stadttore zum Zentrum entsprach (ca. 150 m). Eine Ausnahme davon bildet die Nördlinger Vorstadt, wo das neue vom alten Stadttor 300 m entfernt ist. Die Nördlinger Straße hebt sich auch baulich von den übrigen Altstadtstraßen ab, da sie ihre Richtung ändert und die Häuserfront nicht parallel zur Straße verläuft, sondern deren Häuser gestaffelt und immer ein Stück versetzt zueinander gebaut sind, was den Straßenzug zu etwas Besonderem und einprägsam macht.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 2001. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Back to top