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How to get to Hohenbrunn (Bayern) Hotel Hohenbrunn (Bayern)

Photos of Hohenbrunn, Bayern

photos found. 473. Photos on the current page: 15
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100 Days 100 Blocks, Block Nr. 2, Kinship Fusion Sampler
100 Days 100 Blocks, Block Nr. 2, Kinship Fusion Sampler
  • Author: hohenbrunnerquilterin Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-07-02 13:03:21
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°2'57"N - 11°42'15"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
100 Days 100 Blocks 2019, Block Nr. 1, Kinship Fusion Sampler
100 Days 100 Blocks 2019, Block Nr. 1, Kinship Fusion Sampler
  • Author: hohenbrunnerquilterin Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-07-01 10:55:38
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°2'57"N - 11°42'14"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Hohenbrunn
Solar Orbiter array deployment
Solar Orbiter array deployment
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-21 14:13:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'0"N - 11°39'34"O
  • ESA's Solar Orbiter undergoing a solar array deployment test at the IABG facilities in Ottobrunn, Germany on 21 March 2019. The solar panels are suspended from above to simulate the weightlessness of space. Solar Orbiter will perform a close-up study of our Sun from within the orbit of planet Mercury. It will combine in situ and remote sensing measurements to gain new information about the how our local star works. Solar Orbiter is an ESA-led mission with NASA participation. It is scheduled for launch from Cape Canaveral in February 2020. Credits: ESA – S. Corvaja
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Solar Orbiter array deployment
Solar Orbiter array deployment
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-21 14:20:02
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'0"N - 11°39'34"O
  • ESA's Solar Orbiter undergoing a solar array deployment test at the IABG facilities in Ottobrunn, Germany on 21 March 2019. The solar panels are suspended from above to simulate the weightlessness of space. Solar Orbiter will perform a close-up study of our Sun from within the orbit of planet Mercury. It will combine in situ and remote sensing measurements to gain new information about the how our local star works. Solar Orbiter is an ESA-led mission with NASA participation. It is scheduled for launch from Cape Canaveral in February 2020. Credits: ESA – S. Corvaja
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Solar Orbiter array deployment
Solar Orbiter array deployment
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-21 14:25:06
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'0"N - 11°39'34"O
  • ESA's Solar Orbiter undergoing a solar array deployment test at the IABG facilities in Ottobrunn, Germany on 21 March 2019. The solar panels are suspended from above to simulate the weightlessness of space. Solar Orbiter will perform a close-up study of our Sun from within the orbit of planet Mercury. It will combine in situ and remote sensing measurements to gain new information about the how our local star works. Solar Orbiter is an ESA-led mission with NASA participation. It is scheduled for launch from Cape Canaveral in February 2020. Credits: ESA – S. Corvaja
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Solar Orbiter array deployment test
Solar Orbiter array deployment test
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-21 14:07:31
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'0"N - 11°39'34"O
  • ESA’s Solar Orbiter mission is being put through its paces to prepare it for facing the Sun following launch in February 2020. The spacecraft is being tested to withstand the vibrations of launch, the vacuum of space, and the extreme temperature ranges and magnetic environment that it will experience as it journeys from Earth to within the orbit of the innermost planet, Mercury. The deployment mechanisms of instrument booms, antennas and solar arrays are also checked out. This image captures the scene part way through a solar array deployment test at the IABG facilities in Ottobrunn, Germany, earlier this year. Fully extended, the tip of the array stretches 8.2 m from the spacecraft body. The panels are suspended from above to simulate the weightlessness of space. Click here to watch a video of the full deployment test. The solar arrays have to provide the required power throughout the mission over a wide range of distances from the Sun. Close to the Sun, the spacecraft will endure around 13 times the amount of solar heating that Earth-orbiting satellites experience, with temperatures in excess of 500ºC, so the solar arrays can also be rotated to avoid overheating when closest to the Sun. Solar Orbiter's mission is to provide new views of our star, in particular providing the first close-up observations of the Sun’s poles. Its unique orbit will allow scientists to study the Sun and its outer atmosphere, the ‘corona’, in much more detail than previously possible. We cannot usually see the corona because it is overwhelmed by the bright light of the Sun’s surface itself. During a total eclipse however, when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, that light is blocked, revealing the beautiful white glowing coronaaround the Sun, its structures shaped by the Sun’s magnetic field. This rare sight will be much sought after by astronomers in parts of South America on 2 July, who are getting ready to watch a total solar eclipse. We essentially live in the extended atmosphere of the Sun. The corona continuously expands and spreads into space, developing as the solar wind that interacts with the planets and beyond, sometimes leading to aurora and other space weather effects observed at Earth. Solar Orbiter will measure the solar wind and magnetic fields in the vicinity of the spacecraft while simultaneously taking high-resolution images of features on the Sun, linking the two together. This will give us unprecedented insight into how the Sun creates and controls its dynamic atmosphere, and how it interacts with the planets. Studying the Sun-Earth connection is fundamentally important to understanding how our Solar System works in its entirety. In addition to delivering ground-breaking science in its own right, Solar Orbiter also has important synergies with NASA’s Parker Solar Probe. Coordinated observations will contribute greatly to our understanding of the Sun and its environment. Solar Orbiter is an ESA-led mission with strong NASA participation. The prime contractor is Airbus Defence and Space. The spacecraft is scheduled for launch from Cape Canaveral in February 2020. Credits: ESA – S. Corvaja
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Solar Orbiter array deployment
Solar Orbiter array deployment
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-21 10:26:45
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'0"N - 11°39'34"O
  • ESA's Solar Orbiter undergoing a solar array deployment test at the IABG facilities in Ottobrunn, Germany on 21 March 2019. The solar panels are suspended from above to simulate the weightlessness of space. Solar Orbiter will perform a close-up study of our Sun from within the orbit of planet Mercury. It will combine in situ and remote sensing measurements to gain new information about the how our local star works. Solar Orbiter is an ESA-led mission with NASA participation. It is scheduled for launch from Cape Canaveral in February 2020. Credits: ESA – S. Corvaja
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Connecting to Solar Orbiter
Connecting to Solar Orbiter
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-12 11:04:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'46"N - 11°39'54"O
  • In this image, ESA’s new Solar Orbiter spacecraft is seen during preparations for a vibration test campaign at the IABG facility in Ottobrunn, Germany, in March 2019. While the craft is at Ottobrunn, the Solar Orbiter mission control team located at ESA’s ESOC mission control centre in Darmstadt, Germany, is getting ready to establish data links to the satellite. The live links, dubbed ‘system validation tests’, will see the flight team connect their mission control system to the spacecraft, as they will in future when the control systems on ground ‘talk’ to the spacecraft in orbit via radio signals transmitted by a ground station antenna. “The prime objective of the system validation tests for any spacecraft is to validate that the mission control system can correctly send and receive telecommands to the satellite,” says ESA’s Jose-Luis Pellon-Bailon. “The tests also confirm that the spacecraft launch configuration is as expected by the post-launch Flight Control Procedures.” An initial series of system validation tests were run last summer, when Solar Orbiter was still at its manufacturer, Airbus Defence & Space UK, in Stevenage. “Since then, it has moved to Ottobrunn where we will run the next series of tests in early May and early August, lasting nine days in total and running around the clock,” says Jose-Luis. “Solar Orbiter will then move to the US for launch from Cape Canaveral, where we will run a final series of connection tests at the end of November.” Solar Orbiter will be launched in 2020 to study how the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere, the vast bubble of charged particles blown by the solar wind into the interstellar medium. How we make a space mission ESA is Europe’s space agency, enabling its 22 Member States to achieve results that no individual nation can match. ESA combines space mission development with supporting labs, test and operational facilities plus in-house experts covering every aspect of space, supported through the Agency’s Basic Activities. Credit: ESA - S. Corvaja
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Solar Orbiter during thermal-vacuum tests
Solar Orbiter during thermal-vacuum tests
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-01 16:11:54
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'46"N - 11°39'54"O
  • An infrared view of our Solar Orbiter spacecraft, which is currently undergoing a series of tests at the IABG facility in Ottobrunn, Germany, ahead of its launch, scheduled for February 2020. Selected in 2011 as the first medium-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision programme, Solar Orbiter was designed to perform unprecedented close-up observations of the Sun. The spacecraft carries a suite of 10 state-of-the-art instruments to observe the turbulent, sometimes violent, surface of the Sun and study the changes that take place in the solar wind that flows outward at high speed from our nearest star. Solar Orbiter’s unique orbit will allow scientists to study our parent star and its corona in much more detail than previously possible, and to observe specific features for longer periods than can ever be reached by any spacecraft circling the Earth. In addition, it will measure the solar wind close to the Sun, in an almost pristine state, and provide high-resolution images of the uncharted polar regions of the Sun. After the preliminary definition and design phase, the mission started its integration and qualification in 2016, including environmental testing of the spacecraft as well as validation of all mission systems and sub-systems. The first phase of Solar Orbiter’s environmental testing campaign was conducted in IABG’s special thermal-vacuum chamber in December 2018. Inside the chamber, powerful lamps are used to produce a ‘solar beam’ that simulates the Sun's radiation to demonstrate that the spacecraft can sustain the extreme temperatures it will encounter in the Sun's vicinity. This picture was taken with an infrared camera, and the colouring indicates the temperatures of the spacecraft surface, corresponding to the range indicated in the colour bar on the right-hand side. During this thermal-vacuum test on the spacecraft, the solar beam was used at its maximum flux of about 1800 W/m2, reaching temperatures up to 107,6 ºC. An additional thermal-vacuum test was conducted on the heat shield that protects the entire platform from direct solar radiation: during this test, which used infrared plates to simulate the Sun’s heat, the heat shield reached higher temperatures, up to 520 ºC, similar to what it will experience during operations. In this view, the spacecraft panel that will face the Sun is visible on the left, covered with the heat shield. The dark elements visible in the upper part of the panel are sliding doors that will open the path for sunlight to reach the remote-sensing instruments during science operations. Some of the thrusters that will be used to control the spacecraft orbit and to perform manoeuvres are hosted on the panel that is visible on the right in this view. A video showing the spacecraft rotating as part of a simulated orbit-control-manoeuvre is available here. After completing the thermal-vacuum tests, Solar Orbiter also successfully concluded the mechanical testing phase, including intense vibration tests, shaking the spacecraft to ensure that it will survive the stresses of launch. More information Solar Orbiter is an ESA-led mission with strong NASA participation. It will be launched from Cape Canaveral aboard a NASA-supplied Atlas V launch vehicle. Credits: Airbus Defence and Space/IABG
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Solar Orbiter readied for thermal vacuum testing
Solar Orbiter readied for thermal vacuum testing
  • Author: europeanspaceagency Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-01-30 16:35:01
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'0"N - 11°39'34"O
  • An side view of ESA’s Solar Orbiter as it entered a vacuum chamber for thermal vacuum testing at the IABG test facility in Ottobrunn, Germany, last month. The spacecraft flight model had been readied by prime contractor Airbus in the UK.Due to launch in 2020, Solar Orbiter will observe the Sun and measure the solar wind from a minimum 42 million km away, or less than one-third Earth’s distance. As a result the spacecraft will be subjected to around 13 times the amount of solar heating that Earth-orbiting satellites experience, and temperatures in excess of 500°C. Solar Orbiter’s main body will be protected from direct sunlight by a Sun-facing multi-layer titanium heat shield. The the 1.1-m diameter high gain antenna seen here will be deployed from the body of the spacecraft to, transmit science data back to Earth in high-bandwidth X-band. The antenna’s black colour is unusual. It is covered with the same kind of protective, high temperature coating as the front of Solar Orbiter’s heat shield, based on burnt-bone charcoal. Developed by Irish company ENBIO, this ‘Solar Black’ coating was selected because it can maintain the same colour and surface properties despite years of exposure to unfiltered sunlight and ultraviolet radiation. The high gain antenna is placed at the end of a manoeuverable 1-m long boom allowing Solar Orbiter to maintain a reliable, high-bandwidth link with Earth throughout its science-gathering phase. This test campaign – using powerful lamps to simulate the Sun’s radiation – began by simulating the conditions the spacecraft will undergo as it manoeuvres to its operational orbit through flybys of Earth and Venus. "During 99% of the mission operations time, the heat shield will protect Solar Orbiter, but there will be more than a dozen manoeuvres when one of the side panels will be exposed to sunlight," explained Claudio Damasio, ESA's Solar Orbiter project thermal engineer. "Therefore, we need to know how the Proto Flight Model responds when the exterior of the insulation on these panels reaches a temperature of about 120–150 degrees Celsius." For practical reasons, some elements, such as the solar arrays and the instrument boom, were not integrated with the spacecraft during the test. There were integrated this month on the spacecraft, which will then undergo a series of mechanical and electromagnetic compatibility tests. Credits: Airbus Defence and Space
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
203 002 schleppt ...
203 002 schleppt ...
  • Author: Schnitzel_bank Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-10-28 12:22:18
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°2'55"N - 11°41'47"O
  • ...zwei gestrandete ET423 bei Hohenbrunn (28.10.2012)
  • License*: Attribution-ShareAlike License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Das Tageslicht fällt auf die Seite
Das Tageslicht fällt auf die Seite
  • Author: Casey Hugelfink Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-11-02 16:29:26
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°3'34"N - 11°41'22"O
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bee Block für Iva im Oktober
Bee Block für Iva im Oktober
  • Author: hohenbrunnerquilterin Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-01 09:37:08
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°2'57"N - 11°42'16"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bee Block für Ulrike im September
Bee Block für Ulrike im September
  • Author: hohenbrunnerquilterin Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-09-04 17:46:16
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°2'58"N - 11°42'15"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Teaser für Carolin im September, Round Robin Germany 2018
Teaser für Carolin im September, Round Robin Germany 2018
  • Author: hohenbrunnerquilterin Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-09-30 08:50:36
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 48°2'57"N - 11°42'15"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 473. Photos on the current page: 15
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