ManyFoto.com: photos from the world.

Getting started:

  1. Select the country.
  2. Find location in the text box
    [ Type in an address or City/locality: ]
  3. If necessary change the search radius.
  4. If necessary you can move the marker on the map.
  5. Start the search with
    [ See the photos ]

Or use:

  1. [ Search in ManyFoto.com by Google ]
Note:
manyfoto.com uses the Flickr API but is not endorsed or certified by Flickr.
How to get to Alfacar (Andalucía) Hotel Alfacar (Andalucía)

Photos of Alfacar, Andalucía

photos found. 753. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
20191024_195400
20191024_195400
  • Author: urru_urru Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-24 19:54:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'30"N - 3°32'32"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
20191024_195408
20191024_195408
  • Author: urru_urru Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-24 19:54:08
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'35"N - 3°32'6"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Find the Best Accomodations located to Alfacar, Andalucía
  • New deals listed every day
  • FREE cancellation on most rooms!
  • No booking fees, Save money!, Best Price Guaranteed
  • Manage your booking on the go
  • Book last minute without a credit card!
  • Find out more at Booking.com Reviews
Hotel Alfacar
CONTENIENDO LA NIEVE
CONTENIENDO LA NIEVE
  • Author: Miguel Moliné Fotografía Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-20 12:11:04
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°14'17"N - 3°32'1"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
NIEVE
NIEVE
  • Author: Miguel Moliné Fotografía Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-20 12:10:06
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°14'17"N - 3°32'1"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
PUERTO LOBO 3
PUERTO LOBO 3
  • Author: Miguel Moliné Fotografía Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-20 11:59:28
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°14'17"N - 3°32'7"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:14:20
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:14:03
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:57
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:43
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:33
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:30
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Near Granada
Near Granada
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-21 14:13:28
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°13'28"N - 3°33'37"W
  • Landscape near Granada, just off Route A-92. Granada is a city in the south of Spain with a rich and turbulent history. The first settlements in this area date back to 5500 BC. The Iberian settlement Elibyrge, over time, gave way to the Roman Illiberis. The Visigoths came and went and then the Moors advanced from North Africa into the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Granada (Karnattah in Arabic) was for a long part of the Umayyad Caliphate. In the beginning of the 11th century, after the collapse of the Caliphate, an independent kingdom, Taifa of Granada was formed. In essence, it was a Jewish state, with a Muslim king a symbolic figurehead. Jewish viziers, like Samuel ibn Nagrilla, enjoyed the real power as they were in charge of political and military affairs. Granada was the center of the Sephardic civilization at its apex until the 1066 Granada Massacre which cut short the Golden Age of Jewish culture in Spain. The Almoravids, the Almohads and the Nasrid were the three Berber Moorish dynasties which ruled Granada in succession until the Reconquista. In 1492, Emir Muhammad XII of Granada was the last Muslim ruler to surrender to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. The almost 800-year-long Islamic rule in the Iberian Peninsula was over. Religious persecution soon ensued. Jews were expelled from Spain, and persecution of Muslims led to revolts across the former emirate and their eventual expulsion from Spain in the 17th century. Lacking these talented elements of its populace, Granada sank into a deep decline. The Romantic Movement from the 1830s on rekindled the public interest in the history of the area. This set the stage for the restoration of Granada’s Islamic heritage and the arrival of tourism. Nowadays, with the Alhambra, the Generalife Gardens, Albayzin quarter and the Cathedral, Granada qualifies for a major tourist destination [May 21, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 753. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Back to top