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How to get to Córdoba (Andalucía) Hotel Córdoba (Andalucía)

Photos of Córdoba, Andalucía

photos found. 83952. Photos on the current page: 15
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Torre Campanario de la Mezquita
Torre Campanario de la Mezquita
  • Author: Jotomo62 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-10 17:04:28
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'46"N - 4°46'49"W
  • Uno de los monumentos mas importantes de la ciudad de Cordoba, es su Mezquita con su Torre Campanario una arquitectura que ha marcado la imagen y el perfil de dicha ciudad, dado que a lo largo del tiempo ha mantenido una misma función esencial, la de convocar a los fieles. Sus 51 metros de altura la convierten en la construcción mas elevada de Cordoba. Tras la conquista cristiana, el antiguo alminar queda reconvertido en campanario, sucediendose su aprovechamiento hasta el año 1589, cuando un terremoto afecta a su estructura y se decide la edificación de una nueva torre que envuelve parte de los vestigios califales. Imagen captada desde el Patio de los Naranjos, donde se puede contemplar, tambien, la Puerta del Perdon.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Jilguero
Jilguero
  • Author: FJcuenca Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-10 11:27:57
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'41"N - 4°46'7"W
  • European goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis)
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Córdoba
"La excursión" (G. Durrell).
  • Author: Juan Pablo Cejudo Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-25 11:43:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'44"N - 4°46'45"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Calle Magistral Gonzalez Frances
Calle Magistral Gonzalez Frances
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-26 21:03:53
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'45"N - 4°46'43"W
  • Calle Magistral Gonzalez Frances in Córdoba, Andalusia, near Plaza Santa Catalina. Located at the foot of the Morena Mountains, about 80 miles northeast of Seville, Córdoba dates back to the ancient times as settlements are known to have existed in the mouth of the Guadalquivir from the 8th century BC. In the historical era, the city emerges as Kartuba during the Carthaginian expansion. The city was conquered by the Romans as early as 206 BC and became the capital of the province of Baetica over time. The great Romans Seneca the Elder (orator), Seneca the Younger (philosopher) and Lucan (poet) all came from the Roman Córdoba. The Romans were succeeded by the Byzantines and then the Visigoths who were driven out by the Moorish invasion in 711. Córdoba grew rapidly under the Umayyad rule and by the year 1000 it was the largest city in Europe with a 100,000-strong population, with some scholars’ estimates rising up to 400,000. The city was filled to the brim with palaces and mosques, of which the Great Mosque (the Mezquita) was the largest and most beautiful. Arts and sciences flourished as never before. Suffice it to say that two of the most prominent philosophers of the time, Averroes and Maimonides, were born in Córdoba. At its peak, the city was home to some eighty libraries and educational institutions. The economy prospered, too, with local goods like leather, metal work, glazed tiles and textiles were highly valued across Europe. The Golden Age of Córdoba ended after it fell to the Castilian king Ferdinand II and became part of Christian Spain in 1236. Córdoba was not engaged in the trade with the New World, although Christopher Columbus did meet with the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, here in 1487. The city went on a decline that continued well into the Renaissance times. In the 18th century, the population was reduced to just 20,000 inhabitants. Nowadays, downtown Córdoba remains a typically Moorish city with narrow, winding streets, especially in the older quarter of the center and, farther west, the Juderia (Jewish quarter). The legacy of the past makes it a first-rate tourist destination [May 26, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Calle Conde de Torres Cabrera
Calle Conde de Torres Cabrera
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-26 19:33:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'56"N - 4°46'47"W
  • Calle Conde de Torres Cabrera in Córdoba, Andalusia, near Calle Obispo Fitera. Located at the foot of the Morena Mountains, about 80 miles northeast of Seville, Córdoba dates back to the ancient times as settlements are known to have existed in the mouth of the Guadalquivir from the 8th century BC. In the historical era, the city emerges as Kartuba during the Carthaginian expansion. The city was conquered by the Romans as early as 206 BC and became the capital of the province of Baetica over time. The great Romans Seneca the Elder (orator), Seneca the Younger (philosopher) and Lucan (poet) all came from the Roman Córdoba. The Romans were succeeded by the Byzantines and then the Visigoths who were driven out by the Moorish invasion in 711. Córdoba grew rapidly under the Umayyad rule and by the year 1000 it was the largest city in Europe with a 100,000-strong population, with some scholars’ estimates rising up to 400,000. The city was filled to the brim with palaces and mosques, of which the Great Mosque (the Mezquita) was the largest and most beautiful. Arts and sciences flourished as never before. Suffice it to say that two of the most prominent philosophers of the time, Averroes and Maimonides, were born in Córdoba. At its peak, the city was home to some eighty libraries and educational institutions. The economy prospered, too, with local goods like leather, metal work, glazed tiles and textiles were highly valued across Europe. The Golden Age of Córdoba ended after it fell to the Castilian king Ferdinand II and became part of Christian Spain in 1236. Córdoba was not engaged in the trade with the New World, although Christopher Columbus did meet with the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, here in 1487. The city went on a decline that continued well into the Renaissance times. In the 18th century, the population was reduced to just 20,000 inhabitants. Nowadays, downtown Córdoba remains a typically Moorish city with narrow, winding streets, especially in the older quarter of the center and, farther west, the Juderia (Jewish quarter). The legacy of the past makes it a first-rate tourist destination [May 26, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Calle Magistral Gonzalez Frances
Calle Magistral Gonzalez Frances
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-26 21:04:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'45"N - 4°46'43"W
  • Calle Magistral Gonzalez Frances in Córdoba, Andalusia, near Plaza Santa Catalina. Located at the foot of the Morena Mountains, about 80 miles northeast of Seville, Córdoba dates back to the ancient times as settlements are known to have existed in the mouth of the Guadalquivir from the 8th century BC. In the historical era, the city emerges as Kartuba during the Carthaginian expansion. The city was conquered by the Romans as early as 206 BC and became the capital of the province of Baetica over time. The great Romans Seneca the Elder (orator), Seneca the Younger (philosopher) and Lucan (poet) all came from the Roman Córdoba. The Romans were succeeded by the Byzantines and then the Visigoths who were driven out by the Moorish invasion in 711. Córdoba grew rapidly under the Umayyad rule and by the year 1000 it was the largest city in Europe with a 100,000-strong population, with some scholars’ estimates rising up to 400,000. The city was filled to the brim with palaces and mosques, of which the Great Mosque (the Mezquita) was the largest and most beautiful. Arts and sciences flourished as never before. Suffice it to say that two of the most prominent philosophers of the time, Averroes and Maimonides, were born in Córdoba. At its peak, the city was home to some eighty libraries and educational institutions. The economy prospered, too, with local goods like leather, metal work, glazed tiles and textiles were highly valued across Europe. The Golden Age of Córdoba ended after it fell to the Castilian king Ferdinand II and became part of Christian Spain in 1236. Córdoba was not engaged in the trade with the New World, although Christopher Columbus did meet with the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, here in 1487. The city went on a decline that continued well into the Renaissance times. In the 18th century, the population was reduced to just 20,000 inhabitants. Nowadays, downtown Córdoba remains a typically Moorish city with narrow, winding streets, especially in the older quarter of the center and, farther west, the Juderia (Jewish quarter). The legacy of the past makes it a first-rate tourist destination [May 26, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
calesas cordoba
calesas cordoba
  • Author: K@moeiras Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-12 19:38:30
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'35"N - 4°46'50"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
noria de la albolafia, cordoba
noria de la albolafia, cordoba
  • Author: K@moeiras Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-12 18:18:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'33"N - 4°46'35"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
desde la torre de calahorra, cordoba
desde la torre de calahorra, cordoba
  • Author: K@moeiras Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-12 18:16:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'32"N - 4°46'35"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Mosque-Cathedral, Cordoba , Spain
Mosque-Cathedral, Cordoba , Spain
  • Author: Darcey Prout Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-25 01:59:47
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'45"N - 4°46'45"W
  • The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba (Spanish: Mezquita-Catedral de Córdoba), whose ecclesiastical name is the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption (Spanish: Catedral de Nuestra Señora de la Asunción), is the Catholic cathedral of the Diocese of Córdoba dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary and located in the Spanish region of Andalusia. The structure is regarded as one of the most accomplished monuments of Moorish architecture. According to a traditional account, a small Visigoth church, the Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lérins, originally stood on the site. In 784 Abd al-Rahman I ordered construction of the Great Mosque, which was considerably expanded by later Muslim rulers. Córdoba returned to Christian rule in 1236 during the Reconquista, and the building was converted to a Roman Catholic church, culminating in the insertion of a Renaissance cathedral nave in the 16th century. Since the early 2000s, Spanish Muslims have lobbied the Roman Catholic Church to allow them to pray in the cathedral. This Muslim campaign has been rejected on multiple occasions, both by the church authorities in Spain and by the Vatican.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Casa Rubio restaurante
Casa Rubio restaurante
  • Author: bienve958 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-14 19:57:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'49"N - 4°46'57"W
  • Taberna cordobesa fundada en 1920 con patio andaluz.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Mezquita de Cordoba
Mezquita de Cordoba
  • Author: bienve958 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-14 17:37:54
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'41"N - 4°46'44"W
  • Bóveda de la macsura Fue construidas durante la ampliación de Alhakén II. La maqsura, la zona reservada para el califa, es una zona rectangular adosada al muro de la quibla.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Córdoba
Córdoba
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-27 11:17:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'39"N - 4°46'24"W
  • A view of Córdoba, as seen from Plaza Cruz del Rastro. Located at the foot of the Morena Mountains, about 80 miles northeast of Seville, Córdoba dates back to the ancient times as settlements are known to have existed in the mouth of the Guadalquivir from the 8th century BC. In the historical era, the city emerges as Kartuba during the Carthaginian expansion. The city was conquered by the Romans as early as 206 BC and became the capital of the province of Baetica over time. The great Romans Seneca the Elder (orator), Seneca the Younger (philosopher) and Lucan (poet) all came from the Roman Córdoba. The Romans were succeeded by the Byzantines and then the Visigoths who were driven out by the Moorish invasion in 711. Córdoba grew rapidly under the Umayyad rule and by the year 1000 it was the largest city in Europe with a 100,000-strong population, with some scholars’ estimates rising up to 400,000. The city was filled to the brim with palaces and mosques, of which the Great Mosque (the Mezquita) was the largest and most beautiful. Arts and sciences flourished as never before. Suffice it to say that two of the most prominent philosophers of the time, Averroes and Maimonides, were born in Córdoba. At its peak, the city was home to some eighty libraries and educational institutions. The economy prospered, too, with local goods like leather, metal work, glazed tiles and textiles were highly valued across Europe. The Golden Age of Córdoba ended after it fell to the Castilian king Ferdinand II and became part of Christian Spain in 1236. Córdoba was not engaged in the trade with the New World, although Christopher Columbus did meet with the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, here in 1487. The city went on a decline that continued well into the Renaissance times. In the 18th century, the population was reduced to just 20,000 inhabitants. Nowadays, downtown Córdoba remains a typically Moorish city with narrow, winding streets, especially in the older quarter of the center and, farther west, the Juderia (Jewish quarter). The legacy of the past makes it a first-rate tourist destination [May 26, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Córdoba
Córdoba
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-27 11:17:34
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'39"N - 4°46'24"W
  • A view of Córdoba, as seen from Plaza Cruz del Rastro. Located at the foot of the Morena Mountains, about 80 miles northeast of Seville, Córdoba dates back to the ancient times as settlements are known to have existed in the mouth of the Guadalquivir from the 8th century BC. In the historical era, the city emerges as Kartuba during the Carthaginian expansion. The city was conquered by the Romans as early as 206 BC and became the capital of the province of Baetica over time. The great Romans Seneca the Elder (orator), Seneca the Younger (philosopher) and Lucan (poet) all came from the Roman Córdoba. The Romans were succeeded by the Byzantines and then the Visigoths who were driven out by the Moorish invasion in 711. Córdoba grew rapidly under the Umayyad rule and by the year 1000 it was the largest city in Europe with a 100,000-strong population, with some scholars’ estimates rising up to 400,000. The city was filled to the brim with palaces and mosques, of which the Great Mosque (the Mezquita) was the largest and most beautiful. Arts and sciences flourished as never before. Suffice it to say that two of the most prominent philosophers of the time, Averroes and Maimonides, were born in Córdoba. At its peak, the city was home to some eighty libraries and educational institutions. The economy prospered, too, with local goods like leather, metal work, glazed tiles and textiles were highly valued across Europe. The Golden Age of Córdoba ended after it fell to the Castilian king Ferdinand II and became part of Christian Spain in 1236. Córdoba was not engaged in the trade with the New World, although Christopher Columbus did meet with the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, here in 1487. The city went on a decline that continued well into the Renaissance times. In the 18th century, the population was reduced to just 20,000 inhabitants. Nowadays, downtown Córdoba remains a typically Moorish city with narrow, winding streets, especially in the older quarter of the center and, farther west, the Juderia (Jewish quarter). The legacy of the past makes it a first-rate tourist destination [May 26, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Córdoba
Córdoba
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-27 11:17:22
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 37°52'39"N - 4°46'24"W
  • A view of Córdoba, as seen from Plaza Cruz del Rastro. Located at the foot of the Morena Mountains, about 80 miles northeast of Seville, Córdoba dates back to the ancient times as settlements are known to have existed in the mouth of the Guadalquivir from the 8th century BC. In the historical era, the city emerges as Kartuba during the Carthaginian expansion. The city was conquered by the Romans as early as 206 BC and became the capital of the province of Baetica over time. The great Romans Seneca the Elder (orator), Seneca the Younger (philosopher) and Lucan (poet) all came from the Roman Córdoba. The Romans were succeeded by the Byzantines and then the Visigoths who were driven out by the Moorish invasion in 711. Córdoba grew rapidly under the Umayyad rule and by the year 1000 it was the largest city in Europe with a 100,000-strong population, with some scholars’ estimates rising up to 400,000. The city was filled to the brim with palaces and mosques, of which the Great Mosque (the Mezquita) was the largest and most beautiful. Arts and sciences flourished as never before. Suffice it to say that two of the most prominent philosophers of the time, Averroes and Maimonides, were born in Córdoba. At its peak, the city was home to some eighty libraries and educational institutions. The economy prospered, too, with local goods like leather, metal work, glazed tiles and textiles were highly valued across Europe. The Golden Age of Córdoba ended after it fell to the Castilian king Ferdinand II and became part of Christian Spain in 1236. Córdoba was not engaged in the trade with the New World, although Christopher Columbus did meet with the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, here in 1487. The city went on a decline that continued well into the Renaissance times. In the 18th century, the population was reduced to just 20,000 inhabitants. Nowadays, downtown Córdoba remains a typically Moorish city with narrow, winding streets, especially in the older quarter of the center and, farther west, the Juderia (Jewish quarter). The legacy of the past makes it a first-rate tourist destination [May 26, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 83952. Photos on the current page: 15
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