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How to get to Tarifa (Andalucía) Hotel Tarifa (Andalucía)

Photos of Tarifa, Andalucía

photos found. 10563. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Tarifa-kitesurfing-paradise
Tarifa-kitesurfing-paradise
  • Author: Addict kite school Tarifa Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-12 18:17:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°1'6"N - 5°36'10"W
  • Tarifa our kitesurfing paradise ! Tarifa city view from the sky.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Sognando l'Africa
Sognando l'Africa
  • Author: Enrico Conte Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-10-02 15:07:27
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'44"N - 5°35'55"W
  • Da Tarifa, il Marocco all'orizzonte..
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Tarifa
18_07_11b15_Marbella_073a
18_07_11b15_Marbella_073a
  • Author: around-th3-world Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-07-13 14:46:23
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°1'28"N - 5°36'44"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Pallid Swift (Apus pallidus)
Pallid Swift (Apus pallidus)
  • Author: ipin-by-the-sea Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-26 11:30:07
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'51"N - 5°35'15"W
  • Pallid Swift (Apus pallidus) in flight near Tarifa, Cadiz.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
TARIFA/the light house
TARIFA/the light house
  • Author: inigolai Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-17 17:53:14
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'21"N - 5°36'32"W
  • La Isla de las Palomas/Cadiz/Andalusia/Spain *(2 photomerge) Copyright © 2019 by inigolai/Photography (TARIFAwindEXPERIENCE). No part of this picture may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means , on websites, blogs, without prior permission
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Hablando
Hablando
  • Author: Bart van Hofwegen Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-04 11:26:13
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'47"N - 5°36'12"W
  • Conversation on the stairs
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Castillo de Santa Catalina
Castillo de Santa Catalina
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-23 15:30:44
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'37"N - 5°36'24"W
  • Castillo de Santa Catalina in Tarifa, Province of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. Castillo Santa Catalina is not actually a castle but a watch tower which was constructed in 1931 in an Italian Renaissance style on a small hill of the same name. The interior was simple, in keeping with its military use: barracks, lookout, offices, and kitchen. During the Second World War the hill was fortified again, and a network of pillboxes and bunkers was constructed beneath and next to the castle which can be seen from the road. In 1972-2000 the castle was repaired and became the control center for shipping in the Straits of Gibraltar and a weather station. It is currently closed to the public, after an interesting and polemic life, although many hope it can be restored and reopened. A project to create a visitor and exhibition venue was started in 2006, but work was soon stopped by court order due to the historic nature of the site. Located across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco on the Costa de la Luz (i.e. Coast of Light) at exactly 36 degrees north latitude, Tarifa is the southernmost point in continental Europe. Only islands, such as Malta, Cyprus and Crete, are further south in Europe. Some African territories, including Tunis and Algiers, are to the north of Tarifa. It is at Tarifa where the Mediterranean Sea opens up into the Atlantic Ocean. The history of Tarifa dates back to the Romans times when it was known under the names of Julia Transducta or Mellaria. The current name was given to the town after the attack of Tarif ibn Malik, a Berber warlord, in 711. This event proved crucial for the Iberian Peninsula and the whole Western Europe for centuries to come as what had started as a reconnaissance mission turned out to be the beginning of the Islamic conquest of southern Spain. Just about twenty years later, the Moorish troops took control of the most of Iberia, crossed the Pyrenees and advanced as far as Toulose, Tours and Poitiers where they were finally stopped by Duke Odo of Aquitaine and Charles Martel, Duke and Prince of the Franks. It took almost 800 years for the Moorish rule in Iberia to end as Granada, the last stronghold of the Nasrid dynasty, surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, in 1492. Nowadays, Tarifa is popular with windsurfers and kitesurders due to its unique wind conditions. Either Levante or Poniente prevail in Tarifa over 300 days a year due to the Venturi effect created by the sea over the beaches of the beaches at Playa de Los Lances, Valdevaqueros and Punta Paloma. It is also a passenger port, with ferry lines connecting it to Tangiers and Ceuta [May 23, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
IMG_20191226_140010
IMG_20191226_140010
  • Author: mopedfoarn Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-26 14:00:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'40"N - 5°36'15"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
IMG_20190920_113425
IMG_20190920_113425
  • Author: SolidScorpion Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-09-20 10:34:26
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'50"N - 5°36'17"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Tarifa
Tarifa
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-23 15:44:53
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'37"N - 5°36'24"W
  • A view of Tarifa, Province of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. Located across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco on the Costa de la Luz (i.e. Coast of Light) at exactly 36 degrees north latitude, Tarifa is the southernmost point in continental Europe. Only islands, such as Malta, Cyprus and Crete, are further south in Europe. Some African territories, including Tunis and Algiers, are to the north of Tarifa. It is at Tarifa where the Mediterranean Sea opens up into the Atlantic Ocean. The history of Tarifa dates back to the Romans times when it was known under the names of Julia Transducta or Mellaria. The current name was given to the town after the attack of Tarif ibn Malik, a Berber warlord, in 711. This event proved crucial for the Iberian Peninsula and the whole Western Europe for centuries to come as what had started as a reconnaissance mission turned out to be the beginning of the Islamic conquest of southern Spain. Just about twenty years later, the Moorish troops took control of the most of Iberia, crossed the Pyrenees and advanced as far as Toulose, Tours and Poitiers where they were finally stopped by Duke Odo of Aquitaine and Charles Martel, Duke and Prince of the Franks. It took almost 800 years for the Moorish rule in Iberia to end as Granada, the last stronghold of the Nasrid dynasty, surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, in 1492. Nowadays, Tarifa is popular with windsurfers and kitesurders due to its unique wind conditions. Either Levante or Poniente prevail in Tarifa over 300 days a year due to the Venturi effect created by the sea over the beaches of the beaches at Playa de Los Lances, Valdevaqueros and Punta Paloma. It is also a passenger port, with ferry lines connecting it to Tangiers and Ceuta [May 23, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Tarifa
Tarifa
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-23 15:44:51
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'37"N - 5°36'24"W
  • A view of Tarifa, Province of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. Located across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco on the Costa de la Luz (i.e. Coast of Light) at exactly 36 degrees north latitude, Tarifa is the southernmost point in continental Europe. Only islands, such as Malta, Cyprus and Crete, are further south in Europe. Some African territories, including Tunis and Algiers, are to the north of Tarifa. It is at Tarifa where the Mediterranean Sea opens up into the Atlantic Ocean. The history of Tarifa dates back to the Romans times when it was known under the names of Julia Transducta or Mellaria. The current name was given to the town after the attack of Tarif ibn Malik, a Berber warlord, in 711. This event proved crucial for the Iberian Peninsula and the whole Western Europe for centuries to come as what had started as a reconnaissance mission turned out to be the beginning of the Islamic conquest of southern Spain. Just about twenty years later, the Moorish troops took control of the most of Iberia, crossed the Pyrenees and advanced as far as Toulose, Tours and Poitiers where they were finally stopped by Duke Odo of Aquitaine and Charles Martel, Duke and Prince of the Franks. It took almost 800 years for the Moorish rule in Iberia to end as Granada, the last stronghold of the Nasrid dynasty, surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, in 1492. Nowadays, Tarifa is popular with windsurfers and kitesurders due to its unique wind conditions. Either Levante or Poniente prevail in Tarifa over 300 days a year due to the Venturi effect created by the sea over the beaches of the beaches at Playa de Los Lances, Valdevaqueros and Punta Paloma. It is also a passenger port, with ferry lines connecting it to Tangiers and Ceuta [May 23, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-23 15:44:40
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'37"N - 5°36'24"W
  • The Atlantic Ocean at Tarifa, Province of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. Located across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco on the Costa de la Luz (i.e. Coast of Light) at exactly 36 degrees north latitude, Tarifa is the southernmost point in continental Europe. Only islands, such as Malta, Cyprus and Crete, are further south in Europe. Some African territories, including Tunis and Algiers, are to the north of Tarifa. It is at Tarifa where the Mediterranean Sea opens up into the Atlantic Ocean. The history of Tarifa dates back to the Romans times when it was known under the names of Julia Transducta or Mellaria. The current name was given to the town after the attack of Tarif ibn Malik, a Berber warlord, in 711. This event proved crucial for the Iberian Peninsula and the whole Western Europe for centuries to come as what had started as a reconnaissance mission turned out to be the beginning of the Islamic conquest of southern Spain. Just about twenty years later, the Moorish troops took control of the most of Iberia, crossed the Pyrenees and advanced as far as Toulose, Tours and Poitiers where they were finally stopped by Duke Odo of Aquitaine and Charles Martel, Duke and Prince of the Franks. It took almost 800 years for the Moorish rule in Iberia to end as Granada, the last stronghold of the Nasrid dynasty, surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, in 1492. Nowadays, Tarifa is popular with windsurfers and kitesurders due to its unique wind conditions. Either Levante or Poniente prevail in Tarifa over 300 days a year due to the Venturi effect created by the sea over the beaches of the beaches at Playa de Los Lances, Valdevaqueros and Punta Paloma. It is also a passenger port, with ferry lines connecting it to Tangiers and Ceuta [May 23, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-23 15:31:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'37"N - 5°36'24"W
  • The Atlantic Ocean at Tarifa, Province of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. Located across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco on the Costa de la Luz (i.e. Coast of Light) at exactly 36 degrees north latitude, Tarifa is the southernmost point in continental Europe. Only islands, such as Malta, Cyprus and Crete, are further south in Europe. Some African territories, including Tunis and Algiers, are to the north of Tarifa. It is at Tarifa where the Mediterranean Sea opens up into the Atlantic Ocean. The history of Tarifa dates back to the Romans times when it was known under the names of Julia Transducta or Mellaria. The current name was given to the town after the attack of Tarif ibn Malik, a Berber warlord, in 711. This event proved crucial for the Iberian Peninsula and the whole Western Europe for centuries to come as what had started as a reconnaissance mission turned out to be the beginning of the Islamic conquest of southern Spain. Just about twenty years later, the Moorish troops took control of the most of Iberia, crossed the Pyrenees and advanced as far as Toulose, Tours and Poitiers where they were finally stopped by Duke Odo of Aquitaine and Charles Martel, Duke and Prince of the Franks. It took almost 800 years for the Moorish rule in Iberia to end as Granada, the last stronghold of the Nasrid dynasty, surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, in 1492. Nowadays, Tarifa is popular with windsurfers and kitesurders due to its unique wind conditions. Either Levante or Poniente prevail in Tarifa over 300 days a year due to the Venturi effect created by the sea over the beaches of the beaches at Playa de Los Lances, Valdevaqueros and Punta Paloma. It is also a passenger port, with ferry lines connecting it to Tangiers and Ceuta [May 23, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-23 15:31:28
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'37"N - 5°36'24"W
  • The Atlantic Ocean at Tarifa, Province of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. Located across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco on the Costa de la Luz (i.e. Coast of Light) at exactly 36 degrees north latitude, Tarifa is the southernmost point in continental Europe. Only islands, such as Malta, Cyprus and Crete, are further south in Europe. Some African territories, including Tunis and Algiers, are to the north of Tarifa. It is at Tarifa where the Mediterranean Sea opens up into the Atlantic Ocean. The history of Tarifa dates back to the Romans times when it was known under the names of Julia Transducta or Mellaria. The current name was given to the town after the attack of Tarif ibn Malik, a Berber warlord, in 711. This event proved crucial for the Iberian Peninsula and the whole Western Europe for centuries to come as what had started as a reconnaissance mission turned out to be the beginning of the Islamic conquest of southern Spain. Just about twenty years later, the Moorish troops took control of the most of Iberia, crossed the Pyrenees and advanced as far as Toulose, Tours and Poitiers where they were finally stopped by Duke Odo of Aquitaine and Charles Martel, Duke and Prince of the Franks. It took almost 800 years for the Moorish rule in Iberia to end as Granada, the last stronghold of the Nasrid dynasty, surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, in 1492. Nowadays, Tarifa is popular with windsurfers and kitesurders due to its unique wind conditions. Either Levante or Poniente prevail in Tarifa over 300 days a year due to the Venturi effect created by the sea over the beaches of the beaches at Playa de Los Lances, Valdevaqueros and Punta Paloma. It is also a passenger port, with ferry lines connecting it to Tangiers and Ceuta [May 23, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Weathervane
Weathervane
  • Author: Yuri Rapoport Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-05-23 15:28:20
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 36°0'37"N - 5°36'24"W
  • Fish-shaped weathervane in Tarifa, Province of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. Located across the Strait of Gibraltar from Morocco on the Costa de la Luz (i.e. Coast of Light) at exactly 36 degrees north latitude, Tarifa is the southernmost point in continental Europe. Only islands, such as Malta, Cyprus and Crete, are further south in Europe. Some African territories, including Tunis and Algiers, are to the north of Tarifa. It is at Tarifa where the Mediterranean Sea opens up into the Atlantic Ocean. The history of Tarifa dates back to the Romans times when it was known under the names of Julia Transducta or Mellaria. The current name was given to the town after the attack of Tarif ibn Malik, a Berber warlord, in 711. This event proved crucial for the Iberian Peninsula and the whole Western Europe for centuries to come as what had started as a reconnaissance mission turned out to be the beginning of the Islamic conquest of southern Spain. Just about twenty years later, the Moorish troops took control of the most of Iberia, crossed the Pyrenees and advanced as far as Toulose, Tours and Poitiers where they were finally stopped by Duke Odo of Aquitaine and Charles Martel, Duke and Prince of the Franks. It took almost 800 years for the Moorish rule in Iberia to end as Granada, the last stronghold of the Nasrid dynasty, surrendered to the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife Isabella I of Castile, in 1492. Nowadays, Tarifa is popular with windsurfers and kitesurders due to its unique wind conditions. Either Levante or Poniente prevail in Tarifa over 300 days a year due to the Venturi effect created by the sea over the beaches of the beaches at Playa de Los Lances, Valdevaqueros and Punta Paloma. It is also a passenger port, with ferry lines connecting it to Tangiers and Ceuta [May 23, 2017].
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 10563. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
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