ManyFoto.com: photos from the world.

Getting started:

  1. Select the country.
  2. Find location in the text box
    [ Type in an address or City/locality: ]
  3. If necessary change the search radius.
  4. If necessary you can move the marker on the map.
  5. Start the search with
    [ See the photos ]

Or use:

  1. [ Search in ManyFoto.com by Google ]
Note:
manyfoto.com uses the Flickr API but is not endorsed or certified by Flickr.
How to get to Westhalten (Alsace) Hotel Westhalten (Alsace)

Photos of Westhalten, Alsace

photos found. 685. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Metempsychosis... Orpheus proclaims the message of liberation, Dionysus in particular, the purer their lives the higher will be their next reincarnation
Metempsychosis... Orpheus proclaims the message of liberation, Dionysus in particular, the purer their lives the higher will be their next reincarnation
  • Author: bernawy hugues kossi huo Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-16 15:04:17
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°56'10"N - 7°14'23"O
  • This article is about the Greek conception of the transmigration of the soul. For the general concept, see Reincarnation. A section of Metempsychosis (2019) by François Gachon ; a drop of water from the vapours in the sky transforms into a mountain stream, which flows into a great river and on into the sea, whence rises a dragon (pictured) that turns back to vapour; National Museum of Modern Art, (Important Cultural Property)[1] Metempsychosis (Greek: μετεμψύχωσις) is a philosophical term in the Greek language referring to transmigration of the soul, especially its reincarnation after death. Generally, the term is derived from the context of ancient Greek philosophy, and has been recontextualised by modern philosophers such as Arthur Schopenhauer[2] and Kurt Gödel;[3] otherwise, the term "transmigration" is more appropriate. The word plays a prominent role in James Joyce's Ulysses and is also associated with Nietzsche.[4] Another term sometimes used synonymously is palingenesis. Metempsychosis is a concept from Greek philosophy which is similar to reincarnation. Metempsychosis is also called "transmigration of souls" and describes the process of a soul being transferred to another body after death. This transfer can happen between any human and / or animal body. For example, a human can come back as another human, or as a bird or animal or reptile of some kind. Likewise, animal souls can come back as human. Metempsychosis is different from reincarnation because the soul is not going "up" or "down" the ladder as a result of good or bad actions in life. Instead, the soul chooses a new body as a way of gaining diverse experiences. Pythagoras was the first to theorize metempsychosis as a potential life after death experience, and then Plato expounded on the theory in his Republic. While it is unclear whether Plato actually believed in metempsychosis, he was responsible for its popularization. In Plato's story, a warrior called Er travels to another, immortal realm, and then brings back knowledge to the mortal realm. While he is there, he sees metempsyschosis happening. The souls of the dead are congregated, choosing new bodies to inhabit—animals choosing to become different animals, men choosing to become other men, birds choosing to become men, and even gods choosing to become athletic heroes. When the soul had decided on its new home, it was told to drink from the River Lethe, and then sent down to earth to be born. There are some instances in the Bible of fallen angels taking on human or animal form (Genesis 3:1–7; 6:1–4) and of holy angels appearing as men (Mark 16:5) but this is not considered metempsychosis because the spirit is only inhabiting a body for a short period of time, not taking ownership of it until death. While metempsychosis is a rather poetic idea, it is not a biblical one. Metempsychosis, reincarnation, and all other iterations of this myth are refuted by the Scriptures, which say that man has only one chance to live and only one time to die, after which he must face the judgment of a holy God (Hebrews 9:27). The reincarnation concept takes the pressure off of men by delaying, or even entirely eliminating the judgment of God. But it is very clear that God will judge each man according to the things he has done while in the body (2 Corinthians 5:10). This should be sobering, and even frightening, when we think of the things we have done throughout our lives and the fact that God is completely holy and just, and cannot tolerate anything less than perfection to enter His presence. But God's character is also merciful and He is "a shield for all those who take refuge in him" (2 Samuel 22:31). This was proven by the life of Jesus, who came to live a perfect life and then die as a perfect sacrifice which (by its perfection and its eternal nature) could satisfy the justice of God on our behalf. Every man and woman must stand before God. Those who trust in their own good works to save them will fall short (Romans 3:20). But all who trust in Christ's righteousness rather than their own will be saved (John 3:16–18; Romans 5:1–2; 1 John 2:2). "What is metempsychosis?" Answer: Metempsychosis is a concept in Greek philosophy related to reincarnation and the transmigration of the soul. It is the idea that, when a person dies, his or her soul is transferred into another body, either another human body or the body of an animal. There is nothing biblical about metempsychosis. The theory of metempsychosis originated with Pythagoras and his teacher, Pherecydes of Syros, but the popularization of the concept is due to its adoption by Plato. According to Plato’s view, there is a fixed number of souls in existence, and those souls transmigrate in and out of human and animal bodies, never being destroyed. These souls sometimes travel to another, immortal realm, before returning to the mortal realm, bringing back knowledge. In Plato’s Republic, the soul of a warrior named Er travels to heaven and sees the souls of the dead choosing new bodies. Er sees tame animals choosing to be wild and vice versa, men choosing to be birds, birds choosing to become men, gods choosing to become athletes. Once the soul had made its choice, it drank of the River Lethe and was shot down to earth like a star to be born. Scholars are not sure whether Plato actually believed in metempsychosis or whether his tales were meant to be allegorical. Metempsychosis is unlike reincarnation in that metempsychosis is based on the desire of the soul for new experiences rather than a result of judgment. In the theory of reincarnation, one’s good or bad actions in life determine the nature of the body assigned in the next life. Metempsychosis fits well with Greek philosophy and mythology as a whole; in the Greek myths, gods often take on a human and animal form to achieve their ends. The idea of metempsychosis or reincarnation does not exist in the Bible. At times, spiritual beings took the form of men or animals to influence humankind. Satan appeared to Eve as a serpent in order to engineer the fall of man (Genesis 3:1–7). The holy angels sometimes appeared as men (Mark 16:5). And it seems that fallen angels once took on the form of men in order to procreate with human women and produce giant, evil offspring called Nephilim (Genesis 6:1–4). But none of this can be considered metempsychosis. The Bible teaches that each human soul has one life; after death, the soul faces judgment (Hebrews 9:27). There is no coming back in another body of any form for any reason. Jesus gives a wise perspective: “I will show you whom you should fear: Fear him who, after your body has been killed, has authority to throw you into hell. Yes, I tell you, fear him” (Luke 12:5). Contents 1Europe before the pre-Socratic philosophers 2In Greek philosophy 3Post-Classical occurrence 4In literature after the classical era 5See also 6References 7External links Europe before the pre-Socratic philosophers[edit] It is unclear how the doctrine of metempsychosis arose in Greece. It is easiest to assume that earlier ideas which had never been extinguished were utilized for religious and philosophic purposes. The Orphic religion, which held it, first appeared in Thrace upon the semi-barbarous north-eastern frontier. Orpheus, its legendary founder, is said to have taught that soul and body are united by a compact unequally binding on either; the soul is divine, immortal and aspires to freedom, while the body holds it in fetters as a prisoner. Death dissolves this compact, but only to re-imprison the liberated soul after a short time: for the wheel of birth revolves inexorably. Thus the soul continues its journey, alternating between a separate unrestrained existence and fresh reincarnation, round the wide circle of necessity, as the companion of many bodies of men and animals." To these unfortunate prisoners Orpheus proclaims the message of liberation, that they stand in need of the grace of redeeming gods and of Dionysus in particular, and calls them to turn to God by ascetic piety of life and self-purification: the purer their lives the higher will be their next reincarnation, until the soul has completed the spiral ascent of destiny to live for ever as a God from whom it comes. Such was the teaching of Orphism which appeared in Greece about the 6th century BC, organized itself into private and public mysteries at Eleusis and elsewhere, and produced a copious literature.[5][6][7] In Greek philosophy[edit] The earliest Greek thinker with whom metempsychosis is connected is Pherecydes of Syros;[8] but Pythagoras, who is said to have been his pupil, is its first famous philosophic exponent. Pythagoras is not believed to have invented the doctrine or to have imported it from Egypt. Instead he made his reputation by bringing the Orphic doctrine from North-Eastern Hellas to Magna Graecia, and creating societies for its diffusion. The real weight and importance of metempsychosis in Western tradition is due to its adoption by Plato.[citation needed] In the eschatological myth which closes the Republic he tells the myth how Er, the son of Armenius, miraculously returned to life on the twelfth day after death and recounted the secrets of the other world. After death, he said, he went with others to the place of Judgment and saw the souls returning from heaven, and proceeded with them to a place where they chose new lives, human and animal. He saw the soul of Orpheus changing into a swan, Thamyras becoming a nightingale, musical birds choosing to be men, the soul of Atalanta choosing the honours of an athlete. Men were seen passing into animals and wild and tame animals changing into each other. After their choice the souls drank of Lethe and then shot away like stars to their birth. There are myths and theories to the same effect in other dialogues, the Phaedrus, Meno, Phaedo, Timaeus and Laws.[citation needed] In Plato's view the number of souls was fixed; birth therefore is never the creation of a soul, but only a transmigration from one body to another.[9] Plato's acceptance of the doctrine is characteristic of his sympathy with popular beliefs and desire to incorporate them in a purified form into his system.[citation needed] The extent of Plato's belief in metempsychosis has been debated by some scholars in modern times. Marsilio Ficino (Platonic Theology 17.3–4), for one, argued that Plato's references to metempsychosis were intended allegorically. In later Greek literature the doctrine appears from time to time; it is mentioned in a fragment of Menander (the Inspired Woman) and satirized by Lucian (Gallus 18 seq.). In Roman literature it is found as early as Ennius,[10] who in his Calabrian home must have been familiar with the Greek teachings which had descended to his times from the cities of Magna Graecia. In a lost passage of his Annals, a Roman history in verse, Ennius told how he had seen Homer in a dream, who had assured him that the same soul which had animated both the poets had once belonged to a peacock. Persius in one of his satires (vi. 9) laughs at Ennius for this: it is referred to also by Lucretius (i. 124) and by Horace (Epist. II. i. 52). Virgil works the idea into his account of the Underworld in the sixth book of the Aeneid (vv. 724 sqq.). It persists in antiquity down to the latest classic thinkers, Plotinus and the other Neoplatonists. Post-Classical occurrence[edit] Metempsychosis was a part of the Neo-Manichaen dogma of the Albigenses around France in the 12th century.[11] Created in the early XVth century, the Rosicrucianist movement also conveyed an occult doctrine of metempsychosis.[12] In literature after the classical era[edit] "Metempsychosis" is the title of a longer work by the metaphysical poet John Donne, written in 1601.[13] The poem, also known as the Infinitati Sacrum,[14] consists of two parts, the "Epistle" and "The Progress of the Soule". In the first line of the latter part, Donne writes that he "sing[s] of the progresse of a deathlesse soule".[14] Metempsychosis is a prominent theme in Edgar Allan Poe's 1832 short story "Metzengerstein".[15] Poe returns to metempsychosis again in "Morella" (1835)[16] and "The Oval Portrait" (1842).[17] Metempsychosis is referred to prominently in the concluding paragraph of Chapter 98, "Stowing Down and Clearing Up", of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. Metempsychosis is mentioned as the religion of choice by the minor character Princess Darya Alexandrovna Oblonsky in Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. Herbert Giles uses the term metempsychosis in his translation of the butterfly dream from the Zhuangzi (Chinese: 《莊子》).[18] The use of this term is contested by Hans Georg Möller (de), though, who claims that a better translation is “the changing of things”.[19] Metempsychosis is a recurring theme in James Joyce's modernist novel Ulysses (1922).[20] In Joycean fashion, the word famously appears in Leopold Bloom's inner monologue, recalling how his wife, Molly Bloom, apparently mispronounced it earlier that day as "met him pike hoses."[21] In Thomas Pynchon's 1963 premiere novel V., metempsychosis is mentioned in reference to the book "The Search for Bridey Murphy" by Morey Bernstein, and also later in chapter eight. Metempsychosis is referenced in Don DeLillo's 1982 novel The Names. In David Foster Wallace's 1996 novel Infinite Jest, the name of the character Madame Psychosis is an intentional malapropism of metempsychosis. Guy de Maupassant's story "Le docteur Héraclius Gloss" (1875) is a fable about metempsychosis. In Marcel Proust's famous first paragraph from In Search of Lost Time, the narrator compares his separation from the subject of a book to the process of metempsychosis. In Robert Montgomery Bird's fiction novel Sheppard Lee Written by Himself (1836) the protagonist is a serial identity thief by way of metempsychosis. The eponymous Archy of Don Marquis's archy and mehitabel poems is a cockroach with the transmigrated soul of a human vers libre poet. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metempsychosis
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
20190329-17-03-19
20190329-17-03-19
  • Author: andreas_rothmund Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-29 17:03:19
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°58'8"N - 7°17'52"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Find the Best Accomodations located to Westhalten, Alsace
  • New deals listed every day
  • FREE cancellation on most rooms!
  • No booking fees, Save money!, Best Price Guaranteed
  • Manage your booking on the go
  • Book last minute without a credit card!
  • Find out more at Booking.com Reviews
Hotel Westhalten
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (52)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (52)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 21:37:01
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (51)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (51)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 21:36:57
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (50)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (50)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 21:14:25
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (49)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (49)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 21:14:23
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (48)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (48)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 21:03:54
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (47)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (47)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 21:03:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (46)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (46)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 21:03:27
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (45)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (45)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 20:43:32
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (44)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (44)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 20:43:03
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (43)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (43)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 20:43:01
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (42)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (42)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 20:42:57
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (41)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (41)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 20:42:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (40)
MHB LOTOAVRIL2019 HBOOS (40)
  • Author: MHB PHOTOS Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-19 20:42:33
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 47°57'18"N - 7°17'44"O
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 685. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
1
Back to top