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How to get to Blackrock (Leinster) Hotel Blackrock (Leinster)

Photos of Blackrock, Leinster

photos found. 312. Photos on the current page: 15
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Citroen DS at Cars & Coffee Dundalk.
Citroen DS at Cars & Coffee Dundalk.
  • Author: silverjaguar2011 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-05 11:34:46
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°58'53"N - 6°23'30"W
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Rover SD 1 and Ford Capri at Cars & Coffee Dundalk.
Rover SD 1 and Ford Capri at Cars & Coffee Dundalk.
  • Author: silverjaguar2011 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-05 11:15:05
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°58'55"N - 6°23'33"W
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Hotel Blackrock
BMW at Dundalk Cars & Coffee
BMW at Dundalk Cars & Coffee
  • Author: silverjaguar2011 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-07 11:30:10
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°58'56"N - 6°23'28"W
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Buzzard (Buteo buteo)
Buzzard (Buteo buteo)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-11 16:22:50
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°58'42"N - 6°21'55"W
  • [group] Kites, hawks and eagles | [order] ACCIPITRIFORMES | [family] Accipitridae | [latin] Buteo buteo | [UK] Common Buzzard | [FR] Buse variable | [DE] Mausebussard | [ES] Ratonero Comun | [NL] Buizerd | [IRL] Clamhán Measurements spanwidth min.: 110 cm spanwidth max.: 132 cm size min.: 46 cm size max.: 58 cm Breeding incubation min.: 33 days incubation max.: 38 days fledging min.: 50 days fledging max.: 38 days broods 1 eggs min.: 2 eggs max.: 4 Status: Largely resident, though Ireland receives birds from Britain during the winter. Conservation Concern: Green-listed in Ireland. The European population is considered to be Secure. Identification: A medium sized raptor (bird of prey) with broad wings, a compact body, short neck and medium-length tail. Has a short hooked bill suitable for eating meat. Often seen sitting on fences and telegraph posts or soaring high in the sky, where it shows a fan shaped tail and spread outer wing feathers. Will also hang in the wind on updrafts. Flies with quick, stiff wing beats. Buzzards have very variable plumages from very dark to very light. Much of the plumage is barred. Adults are brown on the upperparts, body and underwing coverts and show a broad black band on the end of the tail and wing feathers. The rest of the underwings are whitish and finely barred. Variation in adult plumage is displayed on both the upper and under sides and some birds can be extremely pale, especially in the tail and upperwing coverts. Juvenile birds are similar to adults and also display a range of light and dark plumage variation; juveniles lack black bands on the ends of their tails and wings and some paler birds show prominent dark markings on the underwing at the carpal (wing joint). Similar Species: Other raptor species Call: Very vocal for a raptor, especially in the spring. Has a loud mewing call which it uses mainly in flight. Diet: Takes a wide variety of prey items including small mammals, birds, rabbits, insects, earthworms and amphibians. Breeding: Breeding birds are found mainly in the north and east of country, north of a line from Sligo to Wexford. The stronghold of the species is in Co. Donegal, Co. Monaghan and Co. Louth. Birds nest in trees and sometimes on cliffs, usually with access to open land including farmland, moorland and wetland. The species was absent in Ireland from the late nineteenth century until 1933, when a pair bred in Antrim. The species has spread slowly down from the north through the twentieth century Wintering: Largely resident. Physical characteristics Extremely variable. Generally dark brown above and on most of underbody and underwing coverts, from below , wingtip and trailing edge of wing dark, flight-feathers barred, pale area in outer primaries. Extensive geographical variation, partly confounded by individual variation. Races separated on size coloration and plumage pattern. Race vulpinus normally smaller, often with rusty underbody underwing coverts and upperside of tail, generally separable from B. rufinus on darker head and faintly barred tail, race menestriesi rather similar to vulpinus, but larger. Habitat Variable, but always with some degree of tree cover. Prefers edges of woods and areas where cultivation, meadows, pastures or moors alternate with coniferous or deciduous woods, or least clumps of trees. In winter open fields, steppe or wetlands. Mainly flat terrain or gentle slopes at low or moderate altitudes. Other details Buteo buteo is a widespread breeder across most of Europe, which accounts for less than half of its global breeding range. Its European breeding population is large (>710,000 pairs), and increased between 1970-1990. Although there were declines in a few countries during 1990-2000, key populations in Russia, Germany and France were stable, and the species was stable or increased across most of the rest of Europe. Feeding Adaptable, diet according to local and seasonal availability. Essentially a hunter of small mammals, particularly rodents, with voles main prey over much of range, also mice, rats hamsters shrews, young rabbits and hares. Sometimes dominant prey by number are invertebrates, crickets, locusts and earthworms. Reptiles locally important, including lizards, slow-worms and snakes. Birds can be important when mammals scarce. Hunts in clearings and open areas near edges or woods, almost always captures prey on ground. Spends long periods perched scanning or loafing, also spots prey from gliding or soaring flight. Walks on ground when hunting invertebrates. Conservation This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Eggs laid from march to may. Nests in large trees, fairly close to edge of wood. Nest is bulky platform of sticks and twigs, lined with greenery. Built in fork or on branch near trunk. 2-4 eggs, incubation 35-38 days by female, but most prey caught by male. Chicks have white or brownish grey first and second down. This species is sexual mature at 3 years old. Migration Migratory in Scandinavia (wintering in S Sweden), and in most of former USSR- partially migratory in C Europe (increasingly so with latitude)- sedentary in Britain, S Europe, Turkey, Caucasus, Japan and in island populations. Winters in Africa, Israel and Arabia- easternmost breeding populations winter in India, Indochina and China- part of C European population move S and SW in autumn, with some migrants reaching NW or even W Africa. Race vulpinus completely migratory, travelling up to 13,000 km, to winter in S Europe and SW Asia, but mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in S- crosses over to Africa mainly via Bab al Mandab in autumn, and returns by Suez in spring- 465,827 birds recorded at Elat (Israel) in spring 1986. Race menestriesi apparently non-migratory. Length of migrants absence from breeding grounds increases with latitude.
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Blackrock
Blackrock
  • Author: KatherineKenny Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-12-26 12:49:42
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'40"N - 6°22'0"W
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Neptune
Neptune
  • Author: KatherineKenny Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-12-26 12:48:51
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'40"N - 6°22'0"W
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Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) male
Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) male
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-02-11 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'9"N - 6°22'39"W
  • Oscar Merne Mermorial Bird Hide Lurgangreen, Co.Louth Ireland [order] Anseriformes | [family] Anatidae | [latin] Bucephala clangula | [UK] Goldeneye | [FR] Garrot à oeil d'or | [DE] Schellente | [ES] Porrón Osculado | [IT] Quattrocchi comune | [NL] Brilduiker Measurements spanwidth min.: 62 cm spanwidth max.: 77 cm size min.: 40 cm size max.: 48 cm Breeding incubation min.: 29 days incubation max.: 30 days fledging min.: 57 days fledging max.: 66 days broods 1 eggs min.: 6 eggs max.: 12 Physical characteristics The common goldeneye,is named for its brilliant yellow iris. Common goldeneyes fly in small compact clusters, with their wings making a distinctive whistle at every wing beat. Male common goldeneyes have blackish iridescent green heads with a white circular patch between the eye and the base of the bill. The breast, sides, belly, and patch across the secondaries and secondary wing coverts are white. The back, rump, and upper tail coverts are black and the tail is grayish brown. The bill is black and the legs and feet are yellowish. Female common goldeneyes have chocolate brown heads, a whitish neckband, and speckled gray back and sides. The upper wings are brownish black with the middle five secondaries colored white. The bill is blackish becoming yellow near the tip and the legs and feet are yellowish. Habitat Nests are usually located near a pond, lake, or river, but may be found in woodlands up to a mile from water. Common goldeneyes use brackish estuarine and saltwater bays and deep freshwater habitats during winter time Other details This duck inhabits the forested regions of northern Eurasia and North America, between 55°N and 70°N. It is breeding in tree holes. The birds visiting the European Union belong to two distinct populations. One is originating from Scandinavia, Finland and western Russia, and wintering mainly in the Baltic and the North Sea but also in smaller numbers on the continental waters of Germany and the lakes around the Alps. It comprises about 300000 individuals, and is constantly increasing. The second population has probably a more eastern origin and is wintering on the middle Danube and in the Adriatic region. It reaches north-eastern Italy and northern Greece. It amounts to about 75000 individuals, but its trends are not well known Feeding Common goldeneyes use brackish estuarine and saltwater bays and deep freshwater habitats in the winter and dive to feed on a wide variety of available animal life. In inland areas during the summer and fall, they feed on aquatic insects, crustaceans and aquatic plants. Along coastal wintering grounds they feed largely on crustaceans, mollusks, small fishes, and some plant material. Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 10,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 2,100,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Common goldeneyes breed across the forested areas of Canada, Minnesota, Michigan, Alaska, and the northeastern United States. They are most abundant among lakes of the Canadian boreal forests, especially where lakes or deep marshes have substantial invertebrate populations. They are cavity nesters and have a strong homing tendency, often using the same cavity in successive years. Nests are usually located near a pond, lake, or river, but may be found in woodlands up to a mile from water. Female common goldeneyes nest in natural tree cavities, abandoned woodpecker holes, or nest-boxes and lay an average of 9 eggs. Migration Partial Migratory; winters at sea in North of range, or at lower latitudes South to Florida, Mediterranean basin, Southern Rusia and Eastern China, occasionally further South. At times well inland (e.g. Central Europe); present all-year in some areas of North West Europe. In North America some may move from the interior to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and south along the Mississippi and Snake Rivers. Along the Atlantic coast, birds winter from Newfoundland to Florida and on the Pacific coast from the Aleutian Chain south to California. The St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes also provide wintering habitat.
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Lamborghini
Lamborghini
  • Author: silverjaguar2011 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-07 10:43:08
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°58'56"N - 6°23'29"W
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Aston Martin
Aston Martin
  • Author: silverjaguar2011 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-10-07 10:52:43
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°58'56"N - 6°23'29"W
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Blackrock Co. Louth
Blackrock Co. Louth
  • Author: Unforgettable Moments Landscapes Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-19 12:13:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°59'37"N - 6°22'42"W
  • Incredible sunset
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Red Knot (Calidris canutus)
Red Knot (Calidris canutus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-01 19:00:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'15"N - 6°22'38"W
  • [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Calidris canutus | [UK] Red Knot | [FR] Bécasseau maubèche | [DE] Knutt | [ES] Correlimos Gordo | [IT] Pivanello maggiore | [NL] Kanoet spanwidth min.: 47 cm spanwidth max.: 53 cm size min.: 23 cm size max.: 26 cm Breeding incubation min.: 21 days incubation max.: 22 days fledging min.: 18 days fledging max.: 20 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Cnota Gnat, Knat, Red Sandpiper, Silver Plover Status: Winter visitor from northern Greenland and from the Queen Elizabeth Islands of high Arctic Canada west to Prince Patrick Island. Most occur between October & February. Conservation Concern: Red-listed in Ireland due to concerns over delines in the global population, which is undergoing a moderate decline. Identification: Short-legged plump wader, larger than Dunlin. Fairly non-descript grey plumage, juveniles in autumn show warm buff wash on breast and underside. Occasional brick-red summer plumaged birds occur on passage. Legs greyish-green. Bill straight, of similar length to head. Long-winged appearance in flight, with thin white wing-bar and pale-grey rump patch. More likely to be seen in very large flocks than singly or small groups. Call: Soft, nasal 'whet-whet'. Diet: Feed predominantly on bivalve mussels and crustaceans. Macoma balthica is the preferred prey and Hydrobia ulvae, Mytilus edulis and Cerastoderma edule are selected when Macoma sp. is absent close to the surface of the sediment. Knots possess large numbers of sensors on their bills and that they are able to detect hard-shelled prey even when buried beyond the reach of their bills. Breeding: Breed at low density, and often close to the coast, nesting on well concealed and sparsely vegetated gravel and rocky slopes. Wintering: The wintering distribution is entirely coastal, and their preferred habitat mostly includes estuarine sites with extensive areas of muddy sand. They occur mostly in large flocks and on fewer estuaries than other wader species. Where to see: Dundalk Bay in County Louth and Strangford Lough in County Down support most birds (7,500 & 10,000 birds respectively). Dublin Bay in County Dublin, Boyne Estuary in County Louth, Rogerstown Estuary in County Dublin and Shannon & Fergus Estuary in County Clare all support >2,000 birds. Physical characteristics Red Knot is a plump, medium-sized shorebird with a fairly short bill. In breeding plumage, its face and underparts are a rich chestnut red. Its upperparts are primarily dark, with some spersed rufous fringing. In winter plumage, the red Knot is plain gray above. Rump and lower back pale gray, blending with tail. Underparts dull white with some dark vertical streaking on upper breast that may extend to the flanks. In breeding plumage female has light-colored feathers amongst the belly feathers and less distinct eyeline. Sexes appear similar in winter. Female has slightly longer wings and bill. Habitat Breeds in drier tundra areas, such as sparsely vegetated hillsides. Outside of breeding season, it is found primarily in intertidal, marine habitats, especially near coastal inlets, estuaries, and bays. Other details This bird has a circumpolar breeding distribution in tundra, and the most important populations are found in North America, Greenland and eastern Siberia. Red Knot has widespread distribution. It breeds in the high Arctic of both the New World and the Old World, although its Old World breeding range is quite limited. One population breeds on islands north of eastern Siberia, and winters across Australasia. A second breeding population is found in a small area of north-central Siberia; this group winters along the coast of western and southern Africa. In North America, Red Knot can be found breeding in Greenland and northeastern Canada, and also in northwestern Alaska and the high Arctic islands of Nunavut. The Greenland/northeastern Canada breeders migrate over the Atlantic and winter in western Europe. The birds visiting Europe belong to two distinct populations. Those of north-eastern Canada and Greenland are wintering along the coasts of north-western Europe (British Isles, Netherlands and France). They amount to about 340000 individuals and have definitely decreased since the 1970's. Those of Svalbard and Taymyr winter in tropical Africa, and visit Europe only as passage migrants. Their population is totalling about 500000 individuals, and seems more stable. Feeding On its Arctic breeding grounds, it prefers high, barren, inland areas, often near a pond or stream. When first arriving in the Arctic, Red Knot eats a substantial amount of plant material; it then switches to a primary food supply of insects as they become more plentiful later in the season. Small invertebrates such as mollusks, marine worms, and crustaceans are major food sources in migration and winter. During spring migration along the Atlantic Coast of the U.S., the species relies heavily on the eggs of horseshoe crabs, which are deposited in the billions along sandy beaches. On the breeding grounds, Red Knot forages for insects mostly by sight, but when feeding on tidal mudflats, it forages mostly by touch, probing for marine invertebrates Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 100,000-1,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 1,100,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding On the breeding grounds, males perform a courtship display in which they fly in high circles above their territory, hover on quivering wings, and then glide through the air while giving mellow calls. They also display on the ground by holding their wings high above the body. Red Knot nests on the ground, creating a shallow, lined scrape on the tundra. A typical clutch contains three to four eggs, and is incubated by both sexes for about three weeks. The downy chicks leave the nest shortly after hatching, and are able to feed themselves. Both parents provide care immediately after hatching, but the female leaves the young before they are fully independent at about three weeks of age. Migration Long distance migrant, with relatively few stopover sites. Race islandica, from Canada and West Greenland, crosses Greenland icecap, North Atlantic, often Iceland (probably not used by birds from Greenland), to Northwest Europe; some move down SW Norway and Denmark, mainly juveniles, only in autumn; spring migration more synchronized, passing through Iceland and North Norway. Race canutus probably has 3 migration routes: birds from Yaktia perhaps move overland to Gulf of Finland, through Baltic and West Europe to West Africa (mainly Banc d´Arguin, Mauritania) and South Africa; Taymyr population presumably halts in West Europe; North migration of both groups along same route, many also stopping over in West France; birds from New Siberian Is probably move down East coast of Asia to Australasia. Most rufa cross West Atlantic from Northeast North America to coast of the Guianas, whereafter most continue to Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego; birds wintering in Florida traditionally ascribed to this race, but probably referable to roselaari; on way N, most birds stage at Delaware Bay. Race rogersi may perform loop migration to Australasia, moving South non-stop across West Pacific, via Sea of Okhotsk, and down East Asian coast (Shanghai and Korea); arrives in North Australia from late Aug, in New Zealand arrives from late Sept and departs late Mar to early Apr; possibly flies non-stop from Northwest & Southeast Australia to Southeast China. Migration route of roselaari not clear, but assumed to winter in West Florida, South Panama and North Venezuela. Adults depart breeding grounds before young. Degree of site fidelity to wintering grounds unclear. Many immatures remain in winter quarters all year.
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Our walk at 6.30 this morning
Our walk at 6.30  this morning
  • Author: William20659 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-07-12 06:50:55
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'46"N - 6°22'7"W
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Red Knot (Calidris canutus)
Red Knot (Calidris canutus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-08-01 18:55:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'15"N - 6°22'38"W
  • [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Calidris canutus | [UK] Red Knot | [FR] Bécasseau maubèche | [DE] Knutt | [ES] Correlimos Gordo | [IT] Pivanello maggiore | [NL] Kanoet spanwidth min.: 47 cm spanwidth max.: 53 cm size min.: 23 cm size max.: 26 cm Breeding incubation min.: 21 days incubation max.: 22 days fledging min.: 18 days fledging max.: 20 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Cnota Gnat, Knat, Red Sandpiper, Silver Plover Status: Winter visitor from northern Greenland and from the Queen Elizabeth Islands of high Arctic Canada west to Prince Patrick Island. Most occur between October & February. Conservation Concern: Red-listed in Ireland due to concerns over delines in the global population, which is undergoing a moderate decline. Identification: Short-legged plump wader, larger than Dunlin. Fairly non-descript grey plumage, juveniles in autumn show warm buff wash on breast and underside. Occasional brick-red summer plumaged birds occur on passage. Legs greyish-green. Bill straight, of similar length to head. Long-winged appearance in flight, with thin white wing-bar and pale-grey rump patch. More likely to be seen in very large flocks than singly or small groups. Call: Soft, nasal 'whet-whet'. Diet: Feed predominantly on bivalve mussels and crustaceans. Macoma balthica is the preferred prey and Hydrobia ulvae, Mytilus edulis and Cerastoderma edule are selected when Macoma sp. is absent close to the surface of the sediment. Knots possess large numbers of sensors on their bills and that they are able to detect hard-shelled prey even when buried beyond the reach of their bills. Breeding: Breed at low density, and often close to the coast, nesting on well concealed and sparsely vegetated gravel and rocky slopes. Wintering: The wintering distribution is entirely coastal, and their preferred habitat mostly includes estuarine sites with extensive areas of muddy sand. They occur mostly in large flocks and on fewer estuaries than other wader species. Where to see: Dundalk Bay in County Louth and Strangford Lough in County Down support most birds (7,500 & 10,000 birds respectively). Dublin Bay in County Dublin, Boyne Estuary in County Louth, Rogerstown Estuary in County Dublin and Shannon & Fergus Estuary in County Clare all support >2,000 birds. Physical characteristics Red Knot is a plump, medium-sized shorebird with a fairly short bill. In breeding plumage, its face and underparts are a rich chestnut red. Its upperparts are primarily dark, with some spersed rufous fringing. In winter plumage, the red Knot is plain gray above. Rump and lower back pale gray, blending with tail. Underparts dull white with some dark vertical streaking on upper breast that may extend to the flanks. In breeding plumage female has light-colored feathers amongst the belly feathers and less distinct eyeline. Sexes appear similar in winter. Female has slightly longer wings and bill. Habitat Breeds in drier tundra areas, such as sparsely vegetated hillsides. Outside of breeding season, it is found primarily in intertidal, marine habitats, especially near coastal inlets, estuaries, and bays. Other details This bird has a circumpolar breeding distribution in tundra, and the most important populations are found in North America, Greenland and eastern Siberia. Red Knot has widespread distribution. It breeds in the high Arctic of both the New World and the Old World, although its Old World breeding range is quite limited. One population breeds on islands north of eastern Siberia, and winters across Australasia. A second breeding population is found in a small area of north-central Siberia; this group winters along the coast of western and southern Africa. In North America, Red Knot can be found breeding in Greenland and northeastern Canada, and also in northwestern Alaska and the high Arctic islands of Nunavut. The Greenland/northeastern Canada breeders migrate over the Atlantic and winter in western Europe. The birds visiting Europe belong to two distinct populations. Those of north-eastern Canada and Greenland are wintering along the coasts of north-western Europe (British Isles, Netherlands and France). They amount to about 340000 individuals and have definitely decreased since the 1970's. Those of Svalbard and Taymyr winter in tropical Africa, and visit Europe only as passage migrants. Their population is totalling about 500000 individuals, and seems more stable. Feeding On its Arctic breeding grounds, it prefers high, barren, inland areas, often near a pond or stream. When first arriving in the Arctic, Red Knot eats a substantial amount of plant material; it then switches to a primary food supply of insects as they become more plentiful later in the season. Small invertebrates such as mollusks, marine worms, and crustaceans are major food sources in migration and winter. During spring migration along the Atlantic Coast of the U.S., the species relies heavily on the eggs of horseshoe crabs, which are deposited in the billions along sandy beaches. On the breeding grounds, Red Knot forages for insects mostly by sight, but when feeding on tidal mudflats, it forages mostly by touch, probing for marine invertebrates Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 100,000-1,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 1,100,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding On the breeding grounds, males perform a courtship display in which they fly in high circles above their territory, hover on quivering wings, and then glide through the air while giving mellow calls. They also display on the ground by holding their wings high above the body. Red Knot nests on the ground, creating a shallow, lined scrape on the tundra. A typical clutch contains three to four eggs, and is incubated by both sexes for about three weeks. The downy chicks leave the nest shortly after hatching, and are able to feed themselves. Both parents provide care immediately after hatching, but the female leaves the young before they are fully independent at about three weeks of age. Migration Long distance migrant, with relatively few stopover sites. Race islandica, from Canada and West Greenland, crosses Greenland icecap, North Atlantic, often Iceland (probably not used by birds from Greenland), to Northwest Europe; some move down SW Norway and Denmark, mainly juveniles, only in autumn; spring migration more synchronized, passing through Iceland and North Norway. Race canutus probably has 3 migration routes: birds from Yaktia perhaps move overland to Gulf of Finland, through Baltic and West Europe to West Africa (mainly Banc d´Arguin, Mauritania) and South Africa; Taymyr population presumably halts in West Europe; North migration of both groups along same route, many also stopping over in West France; birds from New Siberian Is probably move down East coast of Asia to Australasia. Most rufa cross West Atlantic from Northeast North America to coast of the Guianas, whereafter most continue to Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego; birds wintering in Florida traditionally ascribed to this race, but probably referable to roselaari; on way N, most birds stage at Delaware Bay. Race rogersi may perform loop migration to Australasia, moving South non-stop across West Pacific, via Sea of Okhotsk, and down East Asian coast (Shanghai and Korea); arrives in North Australia from late Aug, in New Zealand arrives from late Sept and departs late Mar to early Apr; possibly flies non-stop from Northwest & Southeast Australia to Southeast China. Migration route of roselaari not clear, but assumed to winter in West Florida, South Panama and North Venezuela. Adults depart breeding grounds before young. Degree of site fidelity to wintering grounds unclear. Many immatures remain in winter quarters all year.
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Blackrock, Co. Louth
Blackrock, Co. Louth
  • Author: APT_Allison Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2017-11-25 08:58:59
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'44"N - 6°21'59"W
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Our walk this morning at 6.30am Taken with my new cam phone.
Our walk this morning at 6.30am Taken with my new cam phone.
  • Author: William20659 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-07-12 06:50:36
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°57'38"N - 6°22'1"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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