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How to get to Crookedwood (Leinster) Hotel Crookedwood (Leinster)

Photos of Crookedwood, Leinster

photos found. 16. Photos on the current page: 15
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Biddy Gray's Crooked Wood, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath
Biddy Gray's Crooked Wood, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath
  • Author: National Library of Ireland on The Commons Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2009-04-29 14:09:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°36'10"N - 7°17'34"W
  • For many in the past (who were not Irish or who were more than one generation away from the island) this might appear to be an idyllic Irish scene. The thatched cottage, the granny sitting on the wall outside the open door, the children, well washed and dressed playing in the yard, and the old gentleman stopping to bid good day to the woman of the house! What could perhaps be more sterotypically Irish than that? Photographer: Robert French Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection Date: c.1865-1914 NLI Ref: L_CAB_06954 You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie
  • License*: No known copyright restrictions - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Place of Captivity
Place of Captivity
  • Author: dr_urbanus (Martin) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-26 11:49:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°36'57"N - 7°17'31"W
  • Lough Derravaragh, Co. Westmeath. This large and distinctively shaped lake is known for its role in the Irish legend, the Children of Lir, where King Lir's sons Aodh, Fiachra and Conn, and daughter Fionnuala - were turned into swans for 900 years by their jealous stepmother Aoife. They spent the first 300 years at this lake, which was near their father's castle.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Crookedwood
Church of the Assumption - stained glass window
Church of the Assumption - stained glass window
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 12:23:07
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'17"N - 7°18'12"W
  • A fine 20th century stained glass window seen at the Church of the Assumption at Parsonstown near Mullingar. The image is probably based on a painting by the Spanish painter, Bartolome Murillo (1617-1682) commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bartolome_murillo-inmacul...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Waterpump - Knockdrin, Mullingar
Waterpump - Knockdrin, Mullingar
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 12:31:02
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'18"N - 7°18'9"W
  • Seen on the Castlepollard Road near Knockdrin. Located between the old national school and the Church of the Assumption at Parsonstown, Westmeath. Sadly, this pump has been missing its cap and handle a long time now. Here’s the Google Maps image maps.google.com/maps?q=knockdrin, mullingar&hl=en&amp...
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s Church of Ireland, Taghmon, Westmeath
St Munna’s Church of Ireland, Taghmon, Westmeath
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 13:30:31
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'57"N - 7°16'30"W
  • St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed. The nave section has a barrel-vaulted ceiling and the adjoining tower appears to have been built the same time, adding to its defensive capabilities. There is a pronounced batter around the base of the building and crenellations which run along the parapet are probably a later 19th century addition. The church was extensively renovated in 1843 by the architect Joseph Welland (1798-1860) for use by the local Church of Ireland congregation until 1925, when it was deconsecrated and handed over to the Board of Works to be kept as a national monument. The exterior of the church have a few interesting archaeological features such as the carved windows, a machicolation (which oddly enough, is not directly above the doorway), carved heads and a weather-worn Sheela-na-Gig figure. The entrance wrought iron gate with its limestone piers and foot-style are of 19th century construction. . References: www.buildingsofireland.com/niah/search.jsp?type=record&am... www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Munna's%20%20Church,%20Tag... www.flickr.com/photos/16132340@N07/7067718341/in/photostr... (a fine view of the south-facing side. Notice also the machicolation).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s Church of Ireland, Taghmon, County Westmeath
St Munna’s Church of Ireland, Taghmon, County Westmeath
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-05 15:43:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'57"N - 7°16'26"W
  • St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed. The nave section has a barrel-vaulted ceiling and the adjoining tower appears to have been built the same time, adding to its defensive capabilities. There is a pronounced batter around the base of the building and crenellations which run along the parapet are probably a later 19th century addition. The church was extensively renovated in 1843 by the architect Joseph Welland (1798-1860) for use by the local Church of Ireland congregation until 1925, when it was deconsecrated and handed over to the Board of Works to be kept as a national monument. The exterior of the church have a few interesting archaeological features such as the carved windows, a machicolation (which oddly enough, is not directly above the doorway), carved heads and a weather-worn Sheela-na-Gig figure. The entrance wrought iron gate with its limestone piers and foot-style are of 19th century construction. . References: www.buildingsofireland.com/niah/search.jsp?type=record&am... www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Munna's%20%20Church,%20Tag... www.flickr.com/photos/16132340@N07/7067718341/in/photostr... (a fine view of the south-facing side. Notice also the machicolation).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
house
house
  • Author: JimmyPierce Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-08-19 16:02:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'40"N - 7°19'9"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
house
house
  • Author: JimmyPierce Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2015-08-19 16:20:14
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'41"N - 7°19'8"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Unidentified stone tower - 15th to 18th century?
Unidentified stone tower - 15th to 18th century?
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 12:53:48
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°36'1"N - 7°16'31"W
  • Anyone know what this place is? It may originally have been part of a substantial stone-built structure as there are surviving walls nearby that probably belonged to some sort of dwelling house. Also nearby is a large enclosed area surrounded on four sides by a high and substantial walls that includes two pointed arch doorways and may have been a walled garden. There is a stone tower of similar proportions surviving at the site of the long-gone Baronstown House at Kilbixy, County Westmeath. Barsonstown was an 18th century mansion built for Lord Sunderlin (Edward Malone).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - carved head (15th century)
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - carved head (15th century)
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 13:28:13
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'58"N - 7°16'29"W
  • A carved sandstone head located on the west-facing side of the tower. St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed. The exterior of the church have a few interesting archaeological features such as the carved windows, a machicolation (which oddly enough, is not directly above the doorway), carved heads and a weather-worn Sheela-na-Gig figure. The entrance wrought iron gate with its limestone piers and foot-style are of 19th century construction. . References: www.buildingsofireland.com/niah/search.jsp?type=record&am... www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Munna's%20%20Church,%20Tag... www.flickr.com/photos/16132340@N07/7067718341/in/photostr... (a fine view of the south-facing side. Notice also the machicolation).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - ecclesiastical carved head (15th century)
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - ecclesiastical carved head (15th century)
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 13:23:18
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'57"N - 7°16'28"W
  • A carved sandstone ecclesiastical head above the main entrance door, north-facing side of the building. Perhaps it represents a bishop? St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed. The exterior of the church have a few interesting archaeological features such as the carved windows, a machicolation (which oddly enough, is not directly above the doorway), carved heads and a weather-worn Sheela-na-Gig figure. The entrance wrought iron gate with its limestone piers and foot-style are of 19th century construction. . References: www.buildingsofireland.com/niah/search.jsp?type=record&am... www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Munna's%20%20Church,%20Tag... www.flickr.com/photos/16132340@N07/7067718341/in/photostr... (a fine view of the south-facing side. Notice also the machicolation).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - a cluster of headstones (18th - 20th centuries)
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - a cluster of headstones (18th - 20th centuries)
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 13:25:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'57"N - 7°16'27"W
  • St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - Sheela-na-Gig figure
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - Sheela-na-Gig figure
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 13:22:02
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'58"N - 7°16'30"W
  • A medieval Sheela-na-Gig inserted above the window lintel shows the figure of a grotesque naked woman squatting down, holding her knees against her body while at the same time openly displaying the genitalia. These characteristics are common to all Sheela-na-Gig figures of which many have survived in Ireland and with many specimens in Britain too. Similar figures are also found on the continent but are much rarer there and of a different style. The origin of Sheela-na-Gig figures is unclear but is generally believed they may have been introduced into Ireland around the 11th century as their distribution shows a strong correlation with Anglo-Norman settlement. However, despite many theories, the original use of such figures remains uncertain. The name Sheela-na-Gig may be an English corruption of the Irish Síle ina giob meaning ‘crone on her hunckers’. The word Síle in Gaelic generally refers to an ‘old crone’ or ‘hag’. St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed. The exterior of the church have a few interesting archaeological features such as the carved windows, a machicolation (which oddly enough, is not directly above the doorway), carved heads and a weather-worn Sheela-na-Gig figure. The entrance wrought iron gate with its limestone piers and foot-style are of 19th century construction. . References: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheela_na_gig (Sheela-na-Gig figures). www.buildingsofireland.com/niah/search.jsp?type=record&am... www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Munna's%20%20Church,%20Tag... www.flickr.com/photos/16132340@N07/7067718341/in/photostr... (a fine view of the south-facing side. Notice also the machicolation).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - Sheela-na-Gig figure
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - Sheela-na-Gig figure
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 13:21:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'57"N - 7°16'30"W
  • A medieval Sheela-na-Gig inserted above the window lintel shows the figure of a grotesque naked woman squatting down, holding her knees against her body while at the same time openly displaying the genitalia. These characteristics are common to all Sheela-na-Gig figures of which many have survived in Ireland and with many specimens in Britain too. Similar figures are also found on the continent but are much rarer there and of a different style. The origin of Sheela-na-Gig figures is unclear but is generally believed they may have been introduced into Ireland around the 11th century as their distribution shows a strong correlation with Anglo-Norman settlement. However, despite many theories, the original use of such figures remains uncertain. The name Sheela-na-Gig may be an English corruption of the Irish Síle ina giob meaning ‘crone on her hunckers’. The word Síle in Gaelic generally refers to an ‘old crone’ or ‘hag’. St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed. The exterior of the church have a few interesting archaeological features such as the carved windows, a machicolation (which oddly enough, is not directly above the doorway), carved heads and a weather-worn Sheela-na-Gig figure. The entrance wrought iron gate with its limestone piers and foot-style are of 19th century construction. . References: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheela_na_gig (Sheela-na-Gig figures). www.buildingsofireland.com/niah/search.jsp?type=record&am... www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Munna's%20%20Church,%20Tag... www.flickr.com/photos/16132340@N07/7067718341/in/photostr... (a fine view of the south-facing side. Notice also the machicolation).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - carved sandstone window with Sheela-na-Gig figure
St Munna’s church, Taghmon, Westmeath - carved sandstone window with Sheela-na-Gig figure
  • Author: RETRO STU Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2012-11-03 13:21:09
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°35'57"N - 7°16'28"W
  • A cusped ogee-headed late medieval window constructed of carved sandstone with a Sheela-na-Gig figure inserted above the lintel. Although the carved stonework is late medieval, the whole window has the appearance of being cobbled together from various carved fragments and finished off in-situ. I particularly like the trefoil leaf that had been retained. St Munna’s at Taghmon in County Westmeath is a fortified church built around the mid-15th century on the site of a 6th/7th century monastery attributed to St. Munna (St. Fintan). The mid to late 15th century was a period of extensive building activity across Ireland of both secular and ecclesiastical structures. During this time many large and fine Friaries and townhouses were constructed. The exterior of the church have a few interesting archaeological features such as the carved windows, a machicolation (which oddly enough, is not directly above the doorway), carved heads and a weather-worn Sheela-na-Gig figure. The entrance wrought iron gate with its limestone piers and foot-style are of 19th century construction. . References: www.buildingsofireland.com/niah/search.jsp?type=record&am... www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Munna's%20%20Church,%20Tag... www.flickr.com/photos/16132340@N07/7067718341/in/photostr... (a fine view of the south-facing side. Notice also the machicolation).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 16. Photos on the current page: 15
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