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How to get to Kilmore Quay (Leinster) Hotel Kilmore Quay (Leinster)

Photos of Kilmore Quay, Leinster

photos found. 395. Photos on the current page: 15
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Original colourful Lick'd
Original colourful Lick'd
  • Author: Julie (thanks for 8 million views) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-27 14:46:39
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'22"N - 6°35'21"W
  • I uploaded a monochrome version of this shot a couple of weeks back but the colour version kept talking to me on my iPhone "show me to the world, don't delete me". So here is the original Hipsta shot with the colour tweaked ever so slightly, not that much actually HSS & HBM! Monochrome version (happened to get Explored) in the first comment box below. 57/100x my 100 photos will all be taken using the Hipstamatic App.
  • License*: Attribution License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Lick'd (Explored)
Lick'd (Explored)
  • Author: Julie (thanks for 8 million views) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-27 14:46:39
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'22"N - 6°35'21"W
  • Kilmore Quay ice cream parlour on a very chilly day so no tourists brave enough to sit on the benches HBM & HWW! Taken for my own group Takeaways and chip shops of the world. 55/100x my 100 photos will all be taken using the Hipstamatic App. Having a little Flickr break, I won't be on here for a few days, try & behave while I'm gone ;)
  • License*: Attribution License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Kilmore Quay
Wed, Jan 2nd, 2019 Found Female Dog - Carpark, Kilmore Quay, Wexford
Wed, Jan 2nd, 2019 Found Female Dog - Carpark, Kilmore Quay, Wexford
  • Author: Lost and Found Pets Ireland Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-01-03 12:06:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'20"N - 6°35'22"W
  • Found on Wed Jan 2nd, a female dog, age unknown. www.lostandfoundpets.ie/vp733u
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Great Northern Diver (Gavia immer)
Great Northern Diver (Gavia immer)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-03 11:27:06
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'16"N - 6°35'18"W
  • [order] Gaviiformes | [family] Gaviidae | [latin] Gavia immer | [UK] Loon | [FR] Plongeon huard | [DE] Eistaucher | [ES] Colimbo Grande | [IT] Strolaga maggiore | [NL] Ijsduiker | [IRL] Great Northern Diver Measurements spanwidth min.: 122 cm spanwidth max.: 148 cm size min.: 73 cm size max.: 88 cm Breeding incubation min.: 24 days incubation max.: 25 days fledging min.: 70 days fledging max.: 77 days broods 1 eggs min.: 1 eggs max.: 3 Physical characteristics The Common Loon in summer is very striking with its black-and-white checkered back, glossy black head, white belly and wing lining, and characteristic white necklace around the throat. All loons have greyish feathers in the winter, and immature birds tend to resemble adult birds in winter plumage. The white feathers of the belly and wing linings are present year-round. Loons' habit of swimming low in the water helps to distinguish them from other waterbirds, such as ducks and geese. Loons most resemble the grebes, but can be identified by their larger size, thicker necks, and longer bills. In flight, loons can be recognized by their humpbacked profile, with head and neck held low and feet pressed back towards the body and projecting beyond the tail. Males and females look the same, although males are generally larger. Adults are large-bodied, weighing from 2.7 to over 6.3 kg and measuring almost a metre from bill tip to outstretched feet. The bill is quite large, averaging 75 mm in length, and is black in colour throughout the year. The skeleton and muscular system are designed for swimming and diving. Loons are streamlined. Their legs are placed far back on their body, allowing for excellent movement in water but making them ungainly on land. The head can be held directly in line with the neck during diving to reduce drag, and the legs have powerful muscles for swimming. Habitat Hunting, feeding, resting, preening, and caring for young are the loon's main activities. The bird spends long rest periods motionless on the water. It may rouse itself to stretch a leg or wing at intervals, occasionally comically waggling a foot. When swimming on top of the water it will sit erect with neck slightly curved. The loon will peer underwater, moving its head from side to side to locate prey. It then aims and dives quickly. It will stay underwater for almost a minute and can dive to depths of 80 m. During the dive, feathers are compressed and air is forced from between the feathers and from the air sacs in the body. Loss of air from the air sacs also allows the loon to quietly sink below the water surface to avoid danger. Adult loons may fly to different lakes to feed. The adaptations that make loons such efficient divers also make them heavy and slow to take wing. Common Loons spend most of the time on water and have to pull themselves onto land to nest. They generally move one foot at a time to walk, shuffling along with their breast close to the ground. The loon returns to the water by sliding in along its breast and belly. At night, loons sleep over deeper water, away from land for protection from predators. Other details This bird inhabits the lakes of the boreal regions of North America, Greenland and Island, moving to coastal waters in winter. The population of Greenland and Island - altogether about 3500-4000 birds - is wintering along the British and Norwegian coasts. Small numbers of individuals reach the coasts from Denmark to Portugal Feeding Loons are predators; their diet in summer consists of fish, crayfish, frogs, snails, salamanders, and leeches. Adult loons prefer fish to other food, and seem to favour perch, suckers, catfish, sunfish, smelt, and minnows. Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 10,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 580,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Loons arrive in pairs on northern lakes in the spring as soon as the ice thaws. They are solitary nesters. Small lakes, generally those between 5 and 50 ha, can accommodate one pair of loons. Larger lakes may have more than one pair of breeding loons, with each pair occupying a bay or section of the lake. Until recently, loons were thought to mate for life. Banding studies have shown that loons will sometimes switch mates after a failed nesting attempt, even between nestings in the same season. Courtship and mating are a quiet time, with the pair swimming and making short dives together. Eventually the male leads the female to a suitable spot on land for mating. Nest building then begins. Loons build their nests close to the water, with the best sites being completely surrounded by water, such as on an island, muskrat house, half-submerged log, or sedge mat-a clump of grass-like water plants. Generally the birds can slip directly from the nest to water. The same sites are often used from year to year. Loons will use whatever materials are on hand to build their nests. Researchers have found tree needles, leaves, grass, moss, and other vegetation under loon eggs. If material is not handy, loons will lay their eggs directly on the mud or rock. Sometimes clumps of mud and vegetation are collected from the lake bottom to build the nest. Both the male and female help in nest building and with incubation, or warming the eggs, which lasts until hatching, usually 26 to 31 days. If the eggs are lost, the pair may renest, often in the same general location. Usually two eggs are laid in June, and towards the end of the month loon chicks covered in brown-black down appear on the water. Loon chicks can swim right away, but spend some time on their parents' backs to rest, conserve heat, and avoid predators such as large carnivorous fish, snapping turtles, gulls, eagles, and crows. After their first day or two in the water, the chicks do not return to the nest. Chicks are fed exclusively by their parents for the first few weeks of life, and up until eight weeks of age the adults are with them most of the time, providing most food. After this time the chicks begin to dive for some of their own food and by 11 or 12 weeks of age, the chicks are providing almost all of their own food and may be able to fly. Chicks are fed small food items early in their life including snails, small fish, crayfish, minnows, and some aquatic vegetation. As they grow, they require more protein, and usually are fed more fish, if available. At migration time, the young are able to look after themselves, and the adults generally leave first, with young following soon after. Sometimes loons gather into small groups in the summer. In September, group feeding is quite common as loons gather on larger lakes while migrating. Loons are also usually found in groups on the wintering grounds. The life expectancy of the loon may be 15 to 30 years. Migration From Iceland and Greenland main departures, singly or in small parties, September-October, though some winter southern coasts. Minority reach winter quarters (e.g. Scotland) from mid-August, probably mainly immatures or failed breeders. Spring return early May to mid-June according to latitude and weather, remaining in bays and fjords until thaw of inland ice. Pre-breeders summer chiefly in northern coastal waters, some regularly in Shetland, but seldom North Sea.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Great Northern Diver (Gavia immer)
Great Northern Diver (Gavia immer)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-03 11:26:57
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'16"N - 6°35'18"W
  • [order] Gaviiformes | [family] Gaviidae | [latin] Gavia immer | [UK] Loon | [FR] Plongeon huard | [DE] Eistaucher | [ES] Colimbo Grande | [IT] Strolaga maggiore | [NL] Ijsduiker | [IRL] Great Northern Diver Measurements spanwidth min.: 122 cm spanwidth max.: 148 cm size min.: 73 cm size max.: 88 cm Breeding incubation min.: 24 days incubation max.: 25 days fledging min.: 70 days fledging max.: 77 days broods 1 eggs min.: 1 eggs max.: 3 Physical characteristics The Common Loon in summer is very striking with its black-and-white checkered back, glossy black head, white belly and wing lining, and characteristic white necklace around the throat. All loons have greyish feathers in the winter, and immature birds tend to resemble adult birds in winter plumage. The white feathers of the belly and wing linings are present year-round. Loons' habit of swimming low in the water helps to distinguish them from other waterbirds, such as ducks and geese. Loons most resemble the grebes, but can be identified by their larger size, thicker necks, and longer bills. In flight, loons can be recognized by their humpbacked profile, with head and neck held low and feet pressed back towards the body and projecting beyond the tail. Males and females look the same, although males are generally larger. Adults are large-bodied, weighing from 2.7 to over 6.3 kg and measuring almost a metre from bill tip to outstretched feet. The bill is quite large, averaging 75 mm in length, and is black in colour throughout the year. The skeleton and muscular system are designed for swimming and diving. Loons are streamlined. Their legs are placed far back on their body, allowing for excellent movement in water but making them ungainly on land. The head can be held directly in line with the neck during diving to reduce drag, and the legs have powerful muscles for swimming. Habitat Hunting, feeding, resting, preening, and caring for young are the loon's main activities. The bird spends long rest periods motionless on the water. It may rouse itself to stretch a leg or wing at intervals, occasionally comically waggling a foot. When swimming on top of the water it will sit erect with neck slightly curved. The loon will peer underwater, moving its head from side to side to locate prey. It then aims and dives quickly. It will stay underwater for almost a minute and can dive to depths of 80 m. During the dive, feathers are compressed and air is forced from between the feathers and from the air sacs in the body. Loss of air from the air sacs also allows the loon to quietly sink below the water surface to avoid danger. Adult loons may fly to different lakes to feed. The adaptations that make loons such efficient divers also make them heavy and slow to take wing. Common Loons spend most of the time on water and have to pull themselves onto land to nest. They generally move one foot at a time to walk, shuffling along with their breast close to the ground. The loon returns to the water by sliding in along its breast and belly. At night, loons sleep over deeper water, away from land for protection from predators. Other details This bird inhabits the lakes of the boreal regions of North America, Greenland and Island, moving to coastal waters in winter. The population of Greenland and Island - altogether about 3500-4000 birds - is wintering along the British and Norwegian coasts. Small numbers of individuals reach the coasts from Denmark to Portugal Feeding Loons are predators; their diet in summer consists of fish, crayfish, frogs, snails, salamanders, and leeches. Adult loons prefer fish to other food, and seem to favour perch, suckers, catfish, sunfish, smelt, and minnows. Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 10,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 580,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Loons arrive in pairs on northern lakes in the spring as soon as the ice thaws. They are solitary nesters. Small lakes, generally those between 5 and 50 ha, can accommodate one pair of loons. Larger lakes may have more than one pair of breeding loons, with each pair occupying a bay or section of the lake. Until recently, loons were thought to mate for life. Banding studies have shown that loons will sometimes switch mates after a failed nesting attempt, even between nestings in the same season. Courtship and mating are a quiet time, with the pair swimming and making short dives together. Eventually the male leads the female to a suitable spot on land for mating. Nest building then begins. Loons build their nests close to the water, with the best sites being completely surrounded by water, such as on an island, muskrat house, half-submerged log, or sedge mat-a clump of grass-like water plants. Generally the birds can slip directly from the nest to water. The same sites are often used from year to year. Loons will use whatever materials are on hand to build their nests. Researchers have found tree needles, leaves, grass, moss, and other vegetation under loon eggs. If material is not handy, loons will lay their eggs directly on the mud or rock. Sometimes clumps of mud and vegetation are collected from the lake bottom to build the nest. Both the male and female help in nest building and with incubation, or warming the eggs, which lasts until hatching, usually 26 to 31 days. If the eggs are lost, the pair may renest, often in the same general location. Usually two eggs are laid in June, and towards the end of the month loon chicks covered in brown-black down appear on the water. Loon chicks can swim right away, but spend some time on their parents' backs to rest, conserve heat, and avoid predators such as large carnivorous fish, snapping turtles, gulls, eagles, and crows. After their first day or two in the water, the chicks do not return to the nest. Chicks are fed exclusively by their parents for the first few weeks of life, and up until eight weeks of age the adults are with them most of the time, providing most food. After this time the chicks begin to dive for some of their own food and by 11 or 12 weeks of age, the chicks are providing almost all of their own food and may be able to fly. Chicks are fed small food items early in their life including snails, small fish, crayfish, minnows, and some aquatic vegetation. As they grow, they require more protein, and usually are fed more fish, if available. At migration time, the young are able to look after themselves, and the adults generally leave first, with young following soon after. Sometimes loons gather into small groups in the summer. In September, group feeding is quite common as loons gather on larger lakes while migrating. Loons are also usually found in groups on the wintering grounds. The life expectancy of the loon may be 15 to 30 years. Migration From Iceland and Greenland main departures, singly or in small parties, September-October, though some winter southern coasts. Minority reach winter quarters (e.g. Scotland) from mid-August, probably mainly immatures or failed breeders. Spring return early May to mid-June according to latitude and weather, remaining in bays and fjords until thaw of inland ice. Pre-breeders summer chiefly in northern coastal waters, some regularly in Shetland, but seldom North Sea.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) 1st-W - 2cy
Glaucous Gull  (Larus hyperboreus)   1st-W - 2cy
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-02-03 11:36:36
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'32"N - 6°35'40"W
  • Kilmore Quay, County Wexford Ireland [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Laridae | [latin] Larus hyperboreus | [UK] Glaucous Gull | [FR] Goéland bourgmestre | [DE] Eismöwe | [ES] Gaviota hiperbórea | [IT] Gabbiano glauco | [NL] Grote Burgemeester Measurements spanwidth min.: 138 cm spanwidth max.: 158 cm size min.: 63 cm size max.: 68 cm Breeding incubation min.: 27 days incubation max.: 28 days fledging min.: 45 days fledging max.: 50 days broods 1 eggs min.: 2 eggs max.: 3 Physical characteristics An inhabitant of the far north, the Glaucous Gull is a large, pale gull with a large bill. The adult appears very white. Its back and wings are light gray, and the wingtips are white, with no black on the wing. The tail is white. The legs are pink, and the eyes are yellow. The bill is yellow with a red spot. In the non-breeding season, the adult's head is streaked with brown. Birds in breeding plumage have pure white heads and fleshy yellow eye-rings. The Glaucous Gull may be confused with the Glaucous-winged Gull, with which it hybridizes. Like most of the large gulls, this is a '4-year gull,' meaning that it takes 4 years to reach adult plumage, with a different sub-adult plumage each year. Juveniles are mostly white with buff markings. The first-year plumage is distinguished from that of a Glaucous-winged Gull by the distinctly bi-colored bill with a dark tip and a flesh-pink base. The Glaucous Gull usually associates with flocks of other roosting and feeding gulls such as Glaucous-winged and Herring Gulls. A predator and a scavenger, the Glaucous Gull will steal food from other birds. It forages while flying, walking, or swimming. In flight, it picks items off the surface of the water and may catch smaller birds. Habitat The Glaucous Gull is the only large gull common in the high Arctic. It inhabits cold, coastal bays, estuaries, and offshore areas. In winter, Glaucous Gulls have been found on large inland lakes. Nesting habitat is mainly cliff ledges, islands, and beaches. Foraging habitat includes garbage dumps, fish-processing plants, harbors, mud flats, sewage lagoons, flooded fields, and fish-spawning areas. Other details Larus hyperboreus breeds in Greenland, Svalbard, Iceland and arctic Russia, with Europe accounting for less than a quarter of its global breeding range. Its European breeding population is relatively small (<140,000 pairs), but was stable between 1970- 1990. Although the trends of the populations in Iceland and Russia during 1990- 2000 were unknown, the species was stable in Svalbard and the stronghold Greenland, and hence probably remained stable overall. In the New World Glaucous Gulls are widespread and common in the far north where they are protected from human activities due to the remoteness. High Arctic habitats are slow to rebound from degradation, and these areas should be protected to maintain the population at its current healthy level. Populations in the eastern Bering Sea hybridize with Glaucous-winged Gulls. Feeding Glaucous Gulls eat fish and other aquatic creatures, as well as insects, birds, eggs, berries, carrion, and garbage. Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 1,000,000-10,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 200,000-2,000,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Pairs nest in colonies or alone on cliff tops, flat, rocky ground, ice, or snow. Both adults help build the nest, which is a mound of vegetation and miscellaneous debris, depressed in the center. Both incubate the 3 eggs for about 4 weeks. Both parents feed the downy chicks for close to 2 months. The young leave the nest on foot a few days after hatching, and they stay close to the nest until their first flight at 45-50 days, soon after which they become independent. Migration Migratory, partially migratory, or dispersive in different regions. East Greenland population migratory, believed to winter in Iceland. Resident in Iceland, where numbers much increased in winter. In Eurasia, winters as far north as coasts remain ice free, or refuse available. Present then, though in reduced numbers, on Jan Mayen and Spitsbergen; occurs (immatures predominating) on southern Novaya Zemlya except in winters of heavy ice formation; winters also in White Sea and on coasts of Murmansk and northern Norway. An abundant winter visitor to Faeroes, and reaches Britain and Ireland annually in variable numbers, usually rather small though in severe winters it can become almost common, especially in Scotland where a few aggregations of 80 or more have occurred. Timing of arrival in Britain also variable, according to weather conditions further north, and departures linked to late winter and early spring temperatures; few present before mid-October, and arrivals can continue into December. In mild seasons, departures begin late January or early February, though can be extended to mid-April.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Kilmore Quay
Kilmore Quay
  • Author: NIKKI O BRIEN Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-09-23 16:54:40
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'21"N - 6°35'19"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Trent Class Lifeboat Windsor Runner (Civil Service No 42)
Trent Class Lifeboat Windsor Runner (Civil Service No 42)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-04-22 10:00:14
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'11"N - 6°35'34"W
  • 18-04-22 County Wexford Ireland The Trent-class lifeboat is an all-weather lifeboat operated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) from 30 stations around the coasts of Great Britain and Ireland to provide coverage up to 50 miles (80 km) out to sea. Introduced to service in 1994, the class is named after the River Trent, the second longest river wholly in England. Windsor Runner (Civil Service No 42) was so named to commemorate the fundraising success of the twelve half marathon races held at Windsor Great Park each year up to 1995. This Trent-class lifeboat was stationed at Blyth, Northumberland, and went into service on 1 December 1995. She was purchased at a cost to The Fund of £693,698. This boat was originally based at Blyth Lifeboat Station. A lifeboat had first been based at Blyth in 1808, privately sponsored by Sir Matthew Ridley. This boat was wrecked on service in 1810 and was not replaced. In 1826 the Port of Newcastle Shipwreck Association funded a new Blyth lifeboat and in 1866 the RNLI took over the running of the station. In 1920, for the station's first motor lifeboat, the RNLI built a new boathouse and slipway which, with modifications over the years, is still in use for the "D" class inflatable today. The various motor lifeboats over the years were slipway launched until October 1982 when a Waveney-class fast afloat boat was allocated to the station. The Waveney served until replaced by a new 25knot Trent-class boat in December 1995 (in fact, unusually, all of Blyth's motor lifeboats had been built new for the station). However, a review of lifeboat provision in the North East led to the decision to withdraw the all-weather lifeboat from Blyth, and the station became inshore only on July 16, 2004. Inevitably, decisions to close or downgrade stations often lead to local concerns and following the RNLI's decision the Blyth Volunteer Lifeboat Service was set up and purchased a 38-foot-6-inch Lochin lifeboat which had been built in 1990 for the Caister Volunteer Rescue Service (a body similarly set up after withdrawal of an RNLI all-weather boat). The boat, named Spirit of Blyth and Wansbeck, went into service in 2005.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Trent Class Lifeboat Windsor Runner (Civil Service No 42)
Trent Class Lifeboat Windsor Runner (Civil Service No 42)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-04-22 10:00:33
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'11"N - 6°35'34"W
  • 18-04-22 County Wexford Ireland The Trent-class lifeboat is an all-weather lifeboat operated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) from 30 stations around the coasts of Great Britain and Ireland to provide coverage up to 50 miles (80 km) out to sea. Introduced to service in 1994, the class is named after the River Trent, the second longest river wholly in England. Windsor Runner (Civil Service No 42) was so named to commemorate the fundraising success of the twelve half marathon races held at Windsor Great Park each year up to 1995. This Trent-class lifeboat was stationed at Blyth, Northumberland, and went into service on 1 December 1995. She was purchased at a cost to The Fund of £693,698. This boat was originally based at Blyth Lifeboat Station. A lifeboat had first been based at Blyth in 1808, privately sponsored by Sir Matthew Ridley. This boat was wrecked on service in 1810 and was not replaced. In 1826 the Port of Newcastle Shipwreck Association funded a new Blyth lifeboat and in 1866 the RNLI took over the running of the station. In 1920, for the station's first motor lifeboat, the RNLI built a new boathouse and slipway which, with modifications over the years, is still in use for the "D" class inflatable today. The various motor lifeboats over the years were slipway launched until October 1982 when a Waveney-class fast afloat boat was allocated to the station. The Waveney served until replaced by a new 25knot Trent-class boat in December 1995 (in fact, unusually, all of Blyth's motor lifeboats had been built new for the station). However, a review of lifeboat provision in the North East led to the decision to withdraw the all-weather lifeboat from Blyth, and the station became inshore only on July 16, 2004. Inevitably, decisions to close or downgrade stations often lead to local concerns and following the RNLI's decision the Blyth Volunteer Lifeboat Service was set up and purchased a 38-foot-6-inch Lochin lifeboat which had been built in 1990 for the Caister Volunteer Rescue Service (a body similarly set up after withdrawal of an RNLI all-weather boat). The boat, named Spirit of Blyth and Wansbeck, went into service in 2005.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
At the Kehoe Pub
At the Kehoe Pub
  • Author: frederick.habbe Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-07 20:34:01
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'26"N - 6°35'41"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Ausgenommene Jakobsmuscheln
Ausgenommene Jakobsmuscheln
  • Author: frederick.habbe Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-08 12:55:01
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'29"N - 6°35'16"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
At the Kehoe Pub-2
At the Kehoe Pub-2
  • Author: frederick.habbe Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-08 21:39:15
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'28"N - 6°35'16"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Fast geschafft
Fast geschafft
  • Author: frederick.habbe Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-08 12:54:47
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'29"N - 6°35'16"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Kilmore Quay
Kilmore Quay
  • Author: frederick.habbe Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-09 16:38:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'18"N - 6°35'20"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Mit Dave und Diane
Mit Dave und Diane
  • Author: frederick.habbe Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-06-09 16:37:51
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 52°10'19"N - 6°35'21"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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