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How to get to Lusk (Leinster) Hotel Lusk (Leinster)

Photos of Lusk, Leinster

photos found. 613. Photos on the current page: 15
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Great White Egret (Ardea alba) R&T 22-09-2020
Great White Egret (Ardea alba) R&T 22-09-2020
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-10-09 13:59:07
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'11"N - 6°10'2"W
  • 22-09-2020 R&T spanwidth min.: 145 cm spanwidth max.: 170 cm size min.: 85 cm size max.: 100 cm Breeding incubation min.: 25 days incubation max.: 26 days fledging min.: 38 days fledging max.: 46 days broods 1 eggs min.: 2 eggs max.: 6 Physical characteristics The great egret is a large bird with white plumage, a long thin body, a yellow bill, and legs and feet that are glossy black. The sexes are similar in size, males being slightly heavier. Adults average 81 cm in length with a 140 cm wingspan and weigh between 2 and 2.5 kg. This heron is larger than any other except for the great blue heron. In flight, the great egret holds its neck in a more open S than do other white herons. Habitat The preferred habitat of great egrets is along freshwater and saltwater marshes, ponds, streams, lakes, wooded swamps, mud flats, and urban environments Other details This cosmopolitan species inhabits large swamps, swamp forests, estuaries and coastal marshes in temperate and tropical regions. In Europe it declined strongly since the middle of last century, and it is currently restricted to the central and south-eastern parts of the continent. European birds winter mainly in northern Africa and around the eastern Mediterranean, but an increasing number of individuals winter in Central Europe and the Netherlands. This bird seems to be very sensitive to the conditions of its habitats, and its populations fluctuate strongly. Its Central and Western European populations are increasing since about 1965, and a breeding colony (1-3 pairs) became established in the Netherlands in 1991. The Greek populations are still decreasing, however. The total population of the European Union remains marginal thus compared to the total European population which can be estimated at 12500-16000 breeding pairs Feeding Great egrets are standing motionless in the water waiting for their prey. Their diet primarily consists of aquatic invertebrates and fish. But, they are also known to eat reptiles, amphibians and small mammals. Great egrets forage very similarly to great blue herons; walking slowly through shallow water and snapping up prey as it crosses their path. Young are usually fed frogs, crayfish, and small fish that are regurgitated into their mouths by a parent Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 10,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 550,000-1,900,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Great Egrets usually nest near water, in trees, shrubs, or thickets. They probably first breed at 2-3 years of age. Although isolated pairs are sometimes seen, colonies--often multi-species--are the norm. In multi-species colonies, the Great Egrets tend to nest higher than other species. The male selects the nest area where he displays to attract the female. Both sexes build the stick nest, and both help incubate the 3-4 eggs for 23-26 days. Both parents feed the young by regurgitation. At the age of three weeks, the young may begin to climb about the nest, but do not fledge until 6-7 weeks. Migration Extensive post-breeding dispersal. Populations of Palearctic and Nearctic partially migratory with some dispersive movements; tropical populations sedentary. E Asian birds migrate to SE Asia and Philippines, whereas birds from rest of Palearctic move to Mediterranean, Middle East, Persian Gulf and Pakistan. Birds of E USA winter S along coast to Bahamas and West Indies; W birds move S towards California, Mexico and C America; populations of Mississippi Basin move S to Gulf coast. Australian populations generally dispersive, although some regular seasonal movements occur, which might be migratory; sometimes irruptive, e.g. moving from interior to coast during droughts; occasionally to New Zealand; New Zealand population. Vagrant to islands of subantarctic, Seychelles, Canary Is, N and C Europe; several recent records of race modesta in Europe.
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Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea) R&T 22-09-2020
Curlew Sandpiper (Calidris ferruginea) R&T 22-09-2020
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-10-09 13:59:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°29'58"N - 6°9'52"W
  • x7 R&T 22-09-2020 [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Calidris ferruginea | [UK] Curlew Sandpiper | [FR] Bécasseau cocorli | [DE] Sichelstrandläufer | [ES] Correlimos Zarapitín | [IT] Pivonello comune | [NL] Krombekstrandloper spanwidth min.: 40 cm spanwidth max.: 42 cm size min.: 19 cm size max.: 22 cm Breeding incubation min.: 20 days incubation max.: 22 days fledging min.: 0 days fledging max.: 0 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 5 Physical characteristics Medium size calidris with longish neck and legs and long, decurved bill. Head, neck and all underparts rusty rufous to deep chestnut-red, with dark streaks on crown. Mantle and scapulars dark brown with chestnut and whitish fringes. Wing coverts greyer. Female normally has longer bill. somewhat paler, with greater tendency to have white barring on underparts. Non-breeding adult plain grey above, white below. contrasting white supercilium. Sides of breast washed grey. Habitat Lowlands of Arctic, along coast and on islands in Arctic Ocean, on open tundra with marshy depressions and pools. In winter, chiefly on coast, on muddy or sandy surface of tidal flats, coastal lagoons, estuaries and salt marshes. Frequently inland, at muddy edges of large rivers, lakes, marshes, salt-pans and flooded areas. Other details Calidris ferruginea breeds in a narrow latitudinal range in the central Siberian Arctic, and winters mainly in western and sub-Saharan Africa. Although a tiny proportion of its global population occasionally winters in Iberia, the species is primarily a passage visitor to Europe. Consequently, its status in Europe is Not Evaluated. Feeding Outside breeding season, mainly polychaete worms, molluscs, crustaceans, and sometimes insects. Picks prey from mud or sand surface or probes in mud regularly wading in shallow water. Gregarious outside breeding season, in flocks of up to several thousand. Diurnal and nocurnal. Breeding Egg laying in June-July. Nestis built on margins of marshes and pools, on slopes of hummocky tundra or dry patches in polygonum tundra. 3-8 eggs are laid, incubation 20 days, by female only. Breeding success highly dependent on lemming abundance, with considerable predation by Arctic foxes during low lemmings years, which occur once every 4 years. Migration Migratory. In W Palearctic three major routes: to White Sea, down W European coasts to W Africa; across E Europe via Black Sea and Tunisia to W Africa, following N African coast or flying via Mali; and via Black and Caspian Seas and across Middle East and Rift Valley lakes to E & S Africa. Route through W Europe little used during N migration; instead many fly via Tunisia and Sivash (N Crimea); birds passing S through Sivash winter in E, C & S Africa and probably migrate N via Caspian Sea. Other routes are across Siberia to India, where some continue through SE Asia to Australia, but many winter in S India and Sri Lanka; also overland to E Asia and via Chinese coast to Australia, a route used more on N migration. Migrates long distances non-stop. Males show high degree of site faithfulness. During autumn migration adults precede juveniles and adult males depart early Jul, 3-4 weeks before females; more males than females migrate farther S. On S migration, crosses Europe in Jul, reaching Africa from mid-Jul in N and mainly Sept in S; arrives Australia late Aug to early Sept; juveniles follow 4-6 weeks later. N migration late Apr to May; arrives on breeding grounds from early Jun. Many 1 st-year birds remain on wintering grounds while other non-breeding birds apparently remain just S of breeding grounds, in C Siberia.
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Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe)
Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-08-29 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'38"N - 6°8'12"W
  • Rogerstown 29-08-2020 [group] Chats and Old World flycatchers | [order] PASSERIFORMES | [family] Muscicapidae | [latin] Oenanthe oenanthe | [UK] Northern Wheatear | [FR] Traquet motteux | [DE] Steinschmatzer | [ES] Collalba Gris | [NL] Tapuit | [IRL] Clochrán Measurements spanwidth min.: 28 cm spanwidth max.: 32 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 16 cm Breeding incubation min.: 13 days incubation max.: 15 days fledging min.: 12 days fledging max.: 15 days broods 2 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 7 Status: Widespread summer visitor to uplands and scrubland throughout Ireland, from mid-March to early-October. Common passage migrant to all coasts in spring and autumn. Conservation Concern: Amber-listed in Ireland due to a decline in the breeding population. The European population is currently assessed as Declining, due to a moderate ongoing decline in the population. Identification: Between Robin and Song Thrush in size. In all plumages, has a very obvious tail pattern of a broad lack stripe at the tip with another extending towards the white rump. The whole effect is of a black "T". Adult summer male Wheatears have a pale grey crown, nape and back, as well as a broad black stripe extending from the beak through the eye to the neck. Also has a thin white supercilium. The throat and top of the breast are beige-brown, varying in extent and intensity, while the rest of the underparts are white. The wings are all black. Autumn males have the grey on the crown and back replaced with pale brown, while the black "eye-mask" is reduced in intensity and may be completely absent (cf first-winter and autumn female). Adult summer females resemble summer males, but lack the black "eye-mask", this being a pale brown instead. The white supercilium also tends to be less obvious. Autumn females are very similar to autumn male Wheatears, but never show the black "eye-mask". Juveniles have a streaked grey head and back, as well as a finely barred breast. The wings are brown. This plumage is lost a few weeks after fledging. First-winter Wheatears are nearly inseperable from autumn females. Call: Main calls heard are a soft whistle "hiit" and a harder "chack". The song is quick, melodic whistle, frequently including the "hiit" call note. May perform a short song-flight. Diet: Insects and other invertebrates. Breeding: Breeds in a variety of habitats, typically with some areas of exposed rock and short vegetation, such as along rocky coasts, pasture with stone walls and bogs in uplands. Wintering: Winters in southern Africa. Has one of the longest migration routes of any songbird. Birds breeding in north-eastern Canada fly almost non-stop across the northern Atlantic to Iberia and North Africa. Where to See: Widespread, especially in the west of Ireland. A common migrant throughout Ireland in spring and autumn, even in the Midlands.
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Little Stint (Calidris minuta)
Little Stint (Calidris minuta)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-08-29 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'45"N - 6°7'48"W
  • Rogerstown Harbour Co.Dublin 29-08-2020 [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Calidris minuta | [UK] Little Stint | [FR] Bécasseau minute | [DE] Zwergstrandläufer | [ES] Correlimos Menudo | [IT] Gambecchio comune | [NL] Kleine Strandloper | [IRL] Gobadáinín beag spanwidth min.: 27 cm spanwidth max.: 30 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 15 cm Breeding incubation min.: 20 days incubation max.: 21 days fledging min.: 0 days fledging max.: 0 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Little Sandpiper Status: Scarce passage migrant - occurs while on passage from northern Scandinavia and Russia between August & October. Conservation Concern: Green-listed in Ireland. The European population has been evaluated as Secure. Identification: The smallest regularly occurring wader in Ireland, mostly seen on passage from August to October. It is roughly two-thirds the size of a Dunlin, with which it often associates. Its small size, rufous tones on the upperparts contrasting with a white underparts and agitated rapid feeding action all help to identify it. It has black legs and a small pointed bill. Most of the birds occurring here are juveniles, which show a distinctive white "V" on the back - visible as the bird bends to feed. Usually seen singly or in groups of less than five. Similar Species: Dunlin Call: Sharp, short, high-pitched 'stit' in flight. Song is a weak and repeated 'swee', with the occasional 'svirr-r-r'. Diet: Feeds on invertebrates found on mudflats. Breeding: Does not breed in Ireland. Passage birds seen in Ireland breed on the tundra of northern Siberia. Wintering: Little Stints winter on the Mediterranean coast, as well as tropical Africa. Where to see: Mid-Clare Coast (Mal Bay-Doonbeg Bay) in County Clare, Ballycotton and Shanagarry in County Cork, as well as Tacumshin in County Wexford are reliable sites. Very few records from November to July. Physical characteristics Tiny, stint with short bill, feathers of upperparts have dark brown cintres and pale rufous fringes or tips. Mantle with yellowish edges forming distinct "V". Head, neck and breast rufous buff with brown streaks, rest of underparts, throat and chin white. Female averages larger. Non-breeding adult has brownish grey upperparts mottled dark and fringed pale, crown gey, streaked dark, eyestripe and sides of breast dull grey, rest of face and underparts white. Habitat Tundra, chiefly on dry ground, often among dwarf willows, near swampy areas or salt marshes. On migration found at small inland waters and riverbanks, or coastal, on mudflats and seashore. In winter quarters mainly coastal, at estuarine mudflats, enclosed lagoons, tidal creeks, also at inland fresh waters. Other details Calidris minuta breeds in the arctic north of Norway and Russia, with Europe accounting for less than half of its global breeding range. Although estimates of its European breeding population vary widely, it is probably relatively large (as many as 460,000 pairs), and was stable between 1970-1990. Although there were fluctuations in Norway during 1990-2000, the stronghold population in Russia was stable, and the species probably remained stable overall. Feeding Feeds by rapid pecking actions, sometimes probes. Detects prey by sight. Gregarious, in small to large flocks, sometimes up to several thousand birds, and sometimes defends feeding territory. Breeding Bredding in June-July. Monogamous, polygynous or polyandrous. Little or no fidelity to breeding site. Nest on ground, exposed, but sometimes covered by vegetation, and lined with leaves and pieces of grass. 4 eggs, incubation 21 days, by both parents, but in cases of polygamy by male or female only. Polyandrous females may incubate a second clutch. Chick orange to tawny, mottled above with black bands and dense rows of white or pale down tips, white underparts. Chic care by one parent. Migration Migratory; in broad front across much of W Palearctic; movements S-SW in Jul-Nov, birds returning mid-May to early Jun. Juveniles probably migrate farther W than adults, due to weather displacement. Finnish and Swedish population crosses C Europe, Italy, Mediterranean, France and Tunisia; also major routes between C Mediterranean and Black Sea, and via Caspian Sea and Kazakhstan lakes to and from E & S Africa, apparently following route via Rift Valley lakes; W & C Siberian breeders presumably winter in India, passing through Kazakhstan and also N through Mongolia and Tuva. In Britain, commoner in autumn than in spring, with few birds passing winter. Small numbers may migrate along E Asian coasts, including Hong Kong and Philippines. Many immatures remain S all year. Typical migrating flocks comprise 20-30 birds.
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"Free the Rossport 5" sign, Dublin
  • Author: Gary Boyne Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-05-01 09:42:36
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'6"N - 6°11'28"W
  • situated about 10 km south of Balbriggan on the R132 road The text reads: "You are now leaving Corduff. Free The 5" Five local men were jailed in 2005 in the contentious Shell pipeline in Mayo in the West of Ireland The Shell energy company sought the committal order for landowners who objected to the construction of the high pressure raw gas pipeline from the offshore Corrib Gas Field. The men were released from prison after 94 days, when Shell applied to the High Court to have the injunction lifted. This came after intense media and political scrutiny of the case. There were protests all over Ireland during the period of the men's imprisonment, with filling stations being picketed. Landowner Willie Corduff won the 2007 Goldman Environmental Prize. web.archive.org/web/20071026105433/http://www.publicinqui... - Analysis from the Centre for Public Inquiry
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Realme x2 Pro
Realme x2 Pro
  • Author: Szücs Balázs Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-05-25 18:29:39
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'40"N - 6°7'57"W
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Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-28 15:57:33
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'19"W
  • Rogerstown Estuary North Hide Pathway 28-08-2018 [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Tringa ochropus | [UK] Green Sandpiper | [FR] Chevalier cul-blanc | [DE] Waldwasserläufer | [ES] Andarríos Grande | [IT] Piro-piro culbianco | [NL] Witgat | [IRL] Gobadán glas Measurements spanwidth min.: 41 cm spanwidth max.: 46 cm size min.: 20 cm size max.: 24 cm Breeding incubation min.: 20 days incubation max.: 23 days fledging min.: 26 days fledging max.: 29 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Status: Scarce passage migrant and winter visitor to wetlands. Conservation Concern: Green-listed in Ireland. The European population has been evaluated as Secure. Identification: Slightly larger and very similar to Common Sandpiper. Adult birds have a dark head and upperparts, contrasting markedly with the white belly. The legs are a pale green, while the bill is a dark grey-green. In flight, the most obvious feature is the large white rump contrasting with the dark wings and tail. Juvenile Green Sandpipers are very similar to adults, though can be identified by having the upperparts finely spotted white. Similar Species: Wood Sandpiper, Common Sandpiper, Redshank Call: The flight call is loud "chu-wit-wit". Diet: Feeds mostly on invertebrates in mudflats. Breeding: Does not breed in Ireland. Passage or wintering Green Sandpipers breed in bogs and marshes from Central Europe and Scandinavia east across Asia. Passage birds feed in freshwater wetlands, such as the edges of lakes, ponds, rivers and even streams and ditches. Rarely seen at coastal estuaries. Wintering: Small numbers winter in southern and eastern Counties. Where to See: Rogerstown Estuary in County Dublin is one of the best sites to see Green Sandpipers in Ireland
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Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-28 15:57:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'19"W
  • Rogerstown Estuary North Hide Pathway 28-08-2018 [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Tringa ochropus | [UK] Green Sandpiper | [FR] Chevalier cul-blanc | [DE] Waldwasserläufer | [ES] Andarríos Grande | [IT] Piro-piro culbianco | [NL] Witgat | [IRL] Gobadán glas Measurements spanwidth min.: 41 cm spanwidth max.: 46 cm size min.: 20 cm size max.: 24 cm Breeding incubation min.: 20 days incubation max.: 23 days fledging min.: 26 days fledging max.: 29 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Status: Scarce passage migrant and winter visitor to wetlands. Conservation Concern: Green-listed in Ireland. The European population has been evaluated as Secure. Identification: Slightly larger and very similar to Common Sandpiper. Adult birds have a dark head and upperparts, contrasting markedly with the white belly. The legs are a pale green, while the bill is a dark grey-green. In flight, the most obvious feature is the large white rump contrasting with the dark wings and tail. Juvenile Green Sandpipers are very similar to adults, though can be identified by having the upperparts finely spotted white. Similar Species: Wood Sandpiper, Common Sandpiper, Redshank Call: The flight call is loud "chu-wit-wit". Diet: Feeds mostly on invertebrates in mudflats. Breeding: Does not breed in Ireland. Passage or wintering Green Sandpipers breed in bogs and marshes from Central Europe and Scandinavia east across Asia. Passage birds feed in freshwater wetlands, such as the edges of lakes, ponds, rivers and even streams and ditches. Rarely seen at coastal estuaries. Wintering: Small numbers winter in southern and eastern Counties. Where to See: Rogerstown Estuary in County Dublin is one of the best sites to see Green Sandpipers in Ireland
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Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-22 15:41:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'21"W
  • Rogerstown, Co.Dublin, Ireland [order] Passeriformes | [family] Passeridae | [latin] Passer montanus | [UK] Tree Sparrow | [FR] Moineau friquet | [DE] Feldsperling | [ES] Gorrión Molinero | [IT] Passero mattugio | [NL] Ringmus Measurements spanwidth min.: 20 cm spanwidth max.: 22 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 15 cm Breeding incubation min.: 11 days incubation max.: 14 days fledging min.: 15 days fledging max.: 20 days broods 3 eggs min.: 2 eggs max.: 7 Physical characteristics Smaller than house sparrow from which it can be told by a combination of rich brown crown, black cheek-spot and white neck collar. The sexes are indistinguishable. There are some unusual facets to this species, in Ireland it breeds almost exclusively in holes in old farm buildings, whilst in Europe tree-nesting is the norm. Tree sparrows largely shun higher ground in the British Isles, yet they breed at up to 4,400m in Tibet and, in the Far East, the tree sparrow is the common bird of towns and cities where it replaces the house sparrow. Habitat Mostly nest in holes, and therefore found in mature wooded areas, or where cliffs or quarries provide suitable nest sites. Other details Passer montanus is a widespread resident across much of Europe, which accounts for less than half of its global range. Its European breeding population is extremely large (>26,000,000 pairs), and was stable between 1970-1990. Although populations were stable or increased across parts of Europe-particularly eastern areas-during 1990-2000, the species suffered widespread declines in western and north-west Europe, and underwent a moderate decline (>10%) overall. Feeding Tree Sparrows are primarily ground-feeding seed-eaters, though they also consume small insects especially when breeding. Conservation This species has a large global range; the total size has not yet been quantified, but the Extent of Occurrence in Africa alone is estimated to be 48,000 km². It has a large global population, including an estimated 52,000,000-96,000,000 individuals in Europe (BirdLife International in prep.). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Considered to be a semi-colonial nesting species, the tree sparrow usually uses holes in old farm buildings to breed. Five or six eggs are laid around the beginning of May, with incubation lasting 12 to13 days. Fledging takes about two-and-a-half weeks and two or three broods per year may be raised. Whilst primarily a seed-eating species, invertebrates form an essential part of the diet of unfledged young. Migration Mainly sedentary, especially in west of range, with only small proportion undertaking relatively short-distance migration, mainly to south or south-west. Larger-scale autumn movements occur from time to time, particularly from more northerly parts of range. Numbers involved in these movements are subject to considerable fluctuations, forming irregular pattern that suggests eruptions rather than normal annual migration. Return movement in North Sea area occurs late March to May. Eruptive movements probably responsible for recent southward extensions of range that have occurred in 20th century in Corsica, Sardinia, and Malta, with some overwintering birds remaining to breed. Recolonization of Ireland after extinction in early 1950s probably arose in same way
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Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-22 15:41:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'21"W
  • Rogerstown, Co.Dublin, Ireland [order] Passeriformes | [family] Passeridae | [latin] Passer montanus | [UK] Tree Sparrow | [FR] Moineau friquet | [DE] Feldsperling | [ES] Gorrión Molinero | [IT] Passero mattugio | [NL] Ringmus Measurements spanwidth min.: 20 cm spanwidth max.: 22 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 15 cm Breeding incubation min.: 11 days incubation max.: 14 days fledging min.: 15 days fledging max.: 20 days broods 3 eggs min.: 2 eggs max.: 7 Physical characteristics Smaller than house sparrow from which it can be told by a combination of rich brown crown, black cheek-spot and white neck collar. The sexes are indistinguishable. There are some unusual facets to this species, in Ireland it breeds almost exclusively in holes in old farm buildings, whilst in Europe tree-nesting is the norm. Tree sparrows largely shun higher ground in the British Isles, yet they breed at up to 4,400m in Tibet and, in the Far East, the tree sparrow is the common bird of towns and cities where it replaces the house sparrow. Habitat Mostly nest in holes, and therefore found in mature wooded areas, or where cliffs or quarries provide suitable nest sites. Other details Passer montanus is a widespread resident across much of Europe, which accounts for less than half of its global range. Its European breeding population is extremely large (>26,000,000 pairs), and was stable between 1970-1990. Although populations were stable or increased across parts of Europe-particularly eastern areas-during 1990-2000, the species suffered widespread declines in western and north-west Europe, and underwent a moderate decline (>10%) overall. Feeding Tree Sparrows are primarily ground-feeding seed-eaters, though they also consume small insects especially when breeding. Conservation This species has a large global range; the total size has not yet been quantified, but the Extent of Occurrence in Africa alone is estimated to be 48,000 km². It has a large global population, including an estimated 52,000,000-96,000,000 individuals in Europe (BirdLife International in prep.). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Considered to be a semi-colonial nesting species, the tree sparrow usually uses holes in old farm buildings to breed. Five or six eggs are laid around the beginning of May, with incubation lasting 12 to13 days. Fledging takes about two-and-a-half weeks and two or three broods per year may be raised. Whilst primarily a seed-eating species, invertebrates form an essential part of the diet of unfledged young. Migration Mainly sedentary, especially in west of range, with only small proportion undertaking relatively short-distance migration, mainly to south or south-west. Larger-scale autumn movements occur from time to time, particularly from more northerly parts of range. Numbers involved in these movements are subject to considerable fluctuations, forming irregular pattern that suggests eruptions rather than normal annual migration. Return movement in North Sea area occurs late March to May. Eruptive movements probably responsible for recent southward extensions of range that have occurred in 20th century in Corsica, Sardinia, and Malta, with some overwintering birds remaining to breed. Recolonization of Ireland after extinction in early 1950s probably arose in same way
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  • Author: Alan and Sarah Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-29 15:13:59
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'15"N - 6°11'20"W
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  • Author: Alan and Sarah Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-29 15:13:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'12"N - 6°11'9"W
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  • Author: Alan and Sarah Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-29 15:13:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'15"N - 6°11'20"W
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088 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
088 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
  • Author: andyb2706 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-23 11:22:16
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'14"N - 6°8'36"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
29028 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
29028 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
  • Author: andyb2706 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-23 11:08:48
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'14"N - 6°8'36"W
  • 1015 Dundalk to Dublin Connolly.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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