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How to get to Lusk (Leinster) Hotel Lusk (Leinster)

Photos of Lusk, Leinster

photos found. 616. Photos on the current page: 15
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Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-28 15:57:33
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'19"W
  • Rogerstown Estuary North Hide Pathway 28-08-2018 [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Tringa ochropus | [UK] Green Sandpiper | [FR] Chevalier cul-blanc | [DE] Waldwasserläufer | [ES] Andarríos Grande | [IT] Piro-piro culbianco | [NL] Witgat | [IRL] Gobadán glas Measurements spanwidth min.: 41 cm spanwidth max.: 46 cm size min.: 20 cm size max.: 24 cm Breeding incubation min.: 20 days incubation max.: 23 days fledging min.: 26 days fledging max.: 29 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Status: Scarce passage migrant and winter visitor to wetlands. Conservation Concern: Green-listed in Ireland. The European population has been evaluated as Secure. Identification: Slightly larger and very similar to Common Sandpiper. Adult birds have a dark head and upperparts, contrasting markedly with the white belly. The legs are a pale green, while the bill is a dark grey-green. In flight, the most obvious feature is the large white rump contrasting with the dark wings and tail. Juvenile Green Sandpipers are very similar to adults, though can be identified by having the upperparts finely spotted white. Similar Species: Wood Sandpiper, Common Sandpiper, Redshank Call: The flight call is loud "chu-wit-wit". Diet: Feeds mostly on invertebrates in mudflats. Breeding: Does not breed in Ireland. Passage or wintering Green Sandpipers breed in bogs and marshes from Central Europe and Scandinavia east across Asia. Passage birds feed in freshwater wetlands, such as the edges of lakes, ponds, rivers and even streams and ditches. Rarely seen at coastal estuaries. Wintering: Small numbers winter in southern and eastern Counties. Where to See: Rogerstown Estuary in County Dublin is one of the best sites to see Green Sandpipers in Ireland
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-08-28 15:57:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'19"W
  • Rogerstown Estuary North Hide Pathway 28-08-2018 [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Tringa ochropus | [UK] Green Sandpiper | [FR] Chevalier cul-blanc | [DE] Waldwasserläufer | [ES] Andarríos Grande | [IT] Piro-piro culbianco | [NL] Witgat | [IRL] Gobadán glas Measurements spanwidth min.: 41 cm spanwidth max.: 46 cm size min.: 20 cm size max.: 24 cm Breeding incubation min.: 20 days incubation max.: 23 days fledging min.: 26 days fledging max.: 29 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Status: Scarce passage migrant and winter visitor to wetlands. Conservation Concern: Green-listed in Ireland. The European population has been evaluated as Secure. Identification: Slightly larger and very similar to Common Sandpiper. Adult birds have a dark head and upperparts, contrasting markedly with the white belly. The legs are a pale green, while the bill is a dark grey-green. In flight, the most obvious feature is the large white rump contrasting with the dark wings and tail. Juvenile Green Sandpipers are very similar to adults, though can be identified by having the upperparts finely spotted white. Similar Species: Wood Sandpiper, Common Sandpiper, Redshank Call: The flight call is loud "chu-wit-wit". Diet: Feeds mostly on invertebrates in mudflats. Breeding: Does not breed in Ireland. Passage or wintering Green Sandpipers breed in bogs and marshes from Central Europe and Scandinavia east across Asia. Passage birds feed in freshwater wetlands, such as the edges of lakes, ponds, rivers and even streams and ditches. Rarely seen at coastal estuaries. Wintering: Small numbers winter in southern and eastern Counties. Where to See: Rogerstown Estuary in County Dublin is one of the best sites to see Green Sandpipers in Ireland
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-22 15:41:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'21"W
  • Rogerstown, Co.Dublin, Ireland [order] Passeriformes | [family] Passeridae | [latin] Passer montanus | [UK] Tree Sparrow | [FR] Moineau friquet | [DE] Feldsperling | [ES] Gorrión Molinero | [IT] Passero mattugio | [NL] Ringmus Measurements spanwidth min.: 20 cm spanwidth max.: 22 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 15 cm Breeding incubation min.: 11 days incubation max.: 14 days fledging min.: 15 days fledging max.: 20 days broods 3 eggs min.: 2 eggs max.: 7 Physical characteristics Smaller than house sparrow from which it can be told by a combination of rich brown crown, black cheek-spot and white neck collar. The sexes are indistinguishable. There are some unusual facets to this species, in Ireland it breeds almost exclusively in holes in old farm buildings, whilst in Europe tree-nesting is the norm. Tree sparrows largely shun higher ground in the British Isles, yet they breed at up to 4,400m in Tibet and, in the Far East, the tree sparrow is the common bird of towns and cities where it replaces the house sparrow. Habitat Mostly nest in holes, and therefore found in mature wooded areas, or where cliffs or quarries provide suitable nest sites. Other details Passer montanus is a widespread resident across much of Europe, which accounts for less than half of its global range. Its European breeding population is extremely large (>26,000,000 pairs), and was stable between 1970-1990. Although populations were stable or increased across parts of Europe-particularly eastern areas-during 1990-2000, the species suffered widespread declines in western and north-west Europe, and underwent a moderate decline (>10%) overall. Feeding Tree Sparrows are primarily ground-feeding seed-eaters, though they also consume small insects especially when breeding. Conservation This species has a large global range; the total size has not yet been quantified, but the Extent of Occurrence in Africa alone is estimated to be 48,000 km². It has a large global population, including an estimated 52,000,000-96,000,000 individuals in Europe (BirdLife International in prep.). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Considered to be a semi-colonial nesting species, the tree sparrow usually uses holes in old farm buildings to breed. Five or six eggs are laid around the beginning of May, with incubation lasting 12 to13 days. Fledging takes about two-and-a-half weeks and two or three broods per year may be raised. Whilst primarily a seed-eating species, invertebrates form an essential part of the diet of unfledged young. Migration Mainly sedentary, especially in west of range, with only small proportion undertaking relatively short-distance migration, mainly to south or south-west. Larger-scale autumn movements occur from time to time, particularly from more northerly parts of range. Numbers involved in these movements are subject to considerable fluctuations, forming irregular pattern that suggests eruptions rather than normal annual migration. Return movement in North Sea area occurs late March to May. Eruptive movements probably responsible for recent southward extensions of range that have occurred in 20th century in Corsica, Sardinia, and Malta, with some overwintering birds remaining to breed. Recolonization of Ireland after extinction in early 1950s probably arose in same way
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) male
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-08-22 15:41:56
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'19"N - 6°10'21"W
  • Rogerstown, Co.Dublin, Ireland [order] Passeriformes | [family] Passeridae | [latin] Passer montanus | [UK] Tree Sparrow | [FR] Moineau friquet | [DE] Feldsperling | [ES] Gorrión Molinero | [IT] Passero mattugio | [NL] Ringmus Measurements spanwidth min.: 20 cm spanwidth max.: 22 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 15 cm Breeding incubation min.: 11 days incubation max.: 14 days fledging min.: 15 days fledging max.: 20 days broods 3 eggs min.: 2 eggs max.: 7 Physical characteristics Smaller than house sparrow from which it can be told by a combination of rich brown crown, black cheek-spot and white neck collar. The sexes are indistinguishable. There are some unusual facets to this species, in Ireland it breeds almost exclusively in holes in old farm buildings, whilst in Europe tree-nesting is the norm. Tree sparrows largely shun higher ground in the British Isles, yet they breed at up to 4,400m in Tibet and, in the Far East, the tree sparrow is the common bird of towns and cities where it replaces the house sparrow. Habitat Mostly nest in holes, and therefore found in mature wooded areas, or where cliffs or quarries provide suitable nest sites. Other details Passer montanus is a widespread resident across much of Europe, which accounts for less than half of its global range. Its European breeding population is extremely large (>26,000,000 pairs), and was stable between 1970-1990. Although populations were stable or increased across parts of Europe-particularly eastern areas-during 1990-2000, the species suffered widespread declines in western and north-west Europe, and underwent a moderate decline (>10%) overall. Feeding Tree Sparrows are primarily ground-feeding seed-eaters, though they also consume small insects especially when breeding. Conservation This species has a large global range; the total size has not yet been quantified, but the Extent of Occurrence in Africa alone is estimated to be 48,000 km². It has a large global population, including an estimated 52,000,000-96,000,000 individuals in Europe (BirdLife International in prep.). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Considered to be a semi-colonial nesting species, the tree sparrow usually uses holes in old farm buildings to breed. Five or six eggs are laid around the beginning of May, with incubation lasting 12 to13 days. Fledging takes about two-and-a-half weeks and two or three broods per year may be raised. Whilst primarily a seed-eating species, invertebrates form an essential part of the diet of unfledged young. Migration Mainly sedentary, especially in west of range, with only small proportion undertaking relatively short-distance migration, mainly to south or south-west. Larger-scale autumn movements occur from time to time, particularly from more northerly parts of range. Numbers involved in these movements are subject to considerable fluctuations, forming irregular pattern that suggests eruptions rather than normal annual migration. Return movement in North Sea area occurs late March to May. Eruptive movements probably responsible for recent southward extensions of range that have occurred in 20th century in Corsica, Sardinia, and Malta, with some overwintering birds remaining to breed. Recolonization of Ireland after extinction in early 1950s probably arose in same way
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Irish Rail 29403, Rush & Lusk, June 2019
Irish Rail 29403, Rush & Lusk, June 2019
  • Author: Rochdale 235 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-05 17:41:45
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'30"N - 6°8'20"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Irish Rail 29119, Lusk, June 2019
Irish Rail 29119, Lusk, June 2019
  • Author: Rochdale 235 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-05 17:41:31
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'30"N - 6°8'20"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
  • Author: Alan and Sarah Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-29 15:13:59
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'15"N - 6°11'20"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
  • Author: Alan and Sarah Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-29 15:13:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'12"N - 6°11'9"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
  • Author: Alan and Sarah Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-29 15:13:58
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'15"N - 6°11'20"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Irish Rail 22344, near Rush & Lusk, station, June 2019
Irish Rail 22344, near Rush & Lusk, station, June 2019
  • Author: Rochdale 235 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-05 17:29:42
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'30"N - 6°8'20"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Irish Rail 29414 departs from Rush & Lusk station, June 2019
Irish Rail 29414 departs from Rush & Lusk station, June 2019
  • Author: Rochdale 235 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-05 17:12:18
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'30"N - 6°8'20"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Irish Rail 29407, just outside Rush & Lusk station, June 2019
Irish Rail 29407, just outside Rush & Lusk station, June 2019
  • Author: Rochdale 235 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-05 17:09:21
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'30"N - 6°8'21"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
088 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
088 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
  • Author: andyb2706 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-23 11:22:16
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'14"N - 6°8'36"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
29028 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
29028 Rush and Lusk 23.04.2019
  • Author: andyb2706 Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-04-23 11:08:48
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°31'14"N - 6°8'36"W
  • 1015 Dundalk to Dublin Connolly.
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Estuary
The Estuary
  • Author: Derek Balfe Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-03-18 18:03:32
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°30'9"N - 6°10'17"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 616. Photos on the current page: 15
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