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How to get to Newcastle (Leinster) Hotel Newcastle (Leinster)

Photos of Newcastle, Leinster

photos found. 925. Photos on the current page: 15
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Mute Swan preening
Mute Swan preening
  • Author: Photos - Mike Smith Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-25 11:53:25
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°3'48"N - 6°2'39"W
  • Offshoot Outing to Newcastle Nature Reserve
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IE 095 + service Dublin Connolly - Rosslare - Newcastle
IE 095 + service Dublin Connolly - Rosslare  - Newcastle
  • Author: Rene_Potsdam Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2001-11-04 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'7"N - 6°2'6"W
  • Slechts een paar treinen per dag rijden tussen Dublin en de havenstad Rosslare (in het zuid-westen van Ierland). Op 4. November 2001 maakte ik gebruik van het heerlijke weer en besloot de trein die 's middags Dublin verlaat aan de kust bij Newcastle in de county Wicklow te fotograferen. Ik wilde het voormalige station ook op de foto hebben (wat in 1964 gesloten werd en inmiddels een woonhuis is). Ook de bewoners weten wanneer de treinen komen want de kinderen stonden boven al voor het raam om de trein te bekijken... Lediglich ein paar Züge am Tag fahren zwischen Dublin und Rosslare. Damit braucht man schon ein wenig Glück diese Züge bei ansprechendem Licht zu fotografieren. Am 4. November 2001 hatte ich dieses Glück und fotografierte ich den Mittagszug aus Dublin (Dublin Connolly) welcher im Bild gerade an die ehemalige Haltestelle Newcastle am Irischen Meer vorbei fährt. Die Kinder die hier wohnen wissen auch genau wann die Züge kommen und standen oben bereits am Fenster um den Zug sehen zu können. Newcastle in county Wicklow is a small village which actually had its own railway station back in the days. Opened on August 1st 1856 it was used as a stop for over a hundred years. However, March 30th 1964 it was finally closed. The railways station has been preserved though and is still looking good - albeit now as a normal residence. Just a few trains a day pass this location on the Irish seaboard and when they do, the kids living in th house know this. Which is why, they were patiently waiting in front of the window on a beautiful november day in 2001 for the afternoon service from Dublin Connolly to Rosslare to pass by their house. Class 071 engine 095 was in service on this particular day (November 4th) and passes what was left of the original platform...
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Otter Pair (Lutra lutra) Kilcoole 19-01-2020
Otter Pair (Lutra lutra) Kilcoole 19-01-2020
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-19 00:00:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°5'31"N - 6°2'20"W
  • Otter (Lutra lutra) Dobharchu Carnivora, Mustelidae, Mammal Legal Status Wildlife Act 1976 / 2000 EU Directive 92/43 Annex II, Annex IV Bern Convention Appendix III Key Identification Features The Eurasian otter is a member of the Mustelid family which includes stoats, minks and pine martens in Ireland. They can be distinguished from other Mustelids by their long slender bodies, short legs and long thick tail which tapers off to a point. The head is broad and flat in shape with small forward looking eyes and small rounded ears. Long whiskers protrude from the muzzle. Colouration consists of a thick dark brown coat on their backs with a more grey brown tint on the under belly. The throat area is a pale creamy white colour. Males are larger and heavier than the females with an average adult male’s body and head measuring up to 90cm with a 40cm long tail. Female’s head and body length average up to 80cm with a 35cm long tail. Males when fully grown can weigh up to 11kg with females weighing much less averaging only 7kg. Otter tracks consist of five digit prints which can show webbing and claws on all four feet usually measuring between 6cm and 7cm in length. Otters are agile swimmers with the ability to dive underwater for up to forty seconds in search of prey, when on the surface only the head and part of the tail is visible. On land the otter bounds instead of runs with its head low to the ground. Otters are not particularly vocal but will emit a whistle sound to communicate with more chuckles and chatters being heard during the mating season. As the otter is quite elusive evidence of their droppings called spraints is one way of identifying their presence in an area. They will regularly use the same areas to deposit their spraint which will mark their territories or an area they regularly use for fishing, resting or grooming. The spraint will contain scent information that other otters can use to determine an individual’s age, sex and territorial range. Spraint sites will be located at landmarks such as on large rocks, on high vegetation mounds or under bridges. Habitat Otters are found in a variety of aquatic habitats in Ireland such as lakes, rivers, streams, estuaries, marshland, canals and along the coast. Coastal dwelling otters require access to a freshwater source as they must regularly cleanse their fur of salt as this can effect its insulating properties. Any aquatic environment which has nearby vegetation or rock cover will be used by otters. Several holts will be located within an individual’s territory, lying up sites known as couches will also be used at ground level within a vegetated area which may be linked to the water by a regularly used path which can be accessed quickly to slide into the water. Holts are the main den locations used by otters and can be situated underground along a river’s bank or among the root systems of trees. Otters prefer to use vacated rabbit dens or fox earths rather than excavate their own burrows. Holts are lined with dried vegetation and usually have several entrances some of which can only be accessed from underwater. An individual otter’s territory may contain several holt and couche sites along a linear home range parellel to a river, lake or canal. Food and Feeding Habits Otters are nocturnal carnivorous hunters remaining within a holt for most of the day. Coastal dwelling individuals are generally more active in the daytime compared to those who occupy freshwater habitats. The otters diet is large and varied depending on the local abundance of a particular prey item and its seasonal availability. For those occupying freshwater habitats the preferred food items are fish particularly salmon, trout, perch and pike. In such areas they will also hunt frogs, small mammals and some waterfowl species like duck, moorhen and coot. They are also known to eat carrion if they find a recently deceased animal. Otters in coastal areas will hunt eel, crab, sea urchins and mollusces. In clear waters the otter relies on its strong eyesight to locate its prey which will usually be located along the bottom. In dark or muddy waters the long whiskers known as varrsse will be utilized to detect movement. Most prey will be eaten while on the surface as the otter floats but larger prey must be dragged ashore before it can be eaten. Reproduction and Life Cycle Otters can breed in Ireland year round but mating usually occurs in spring and summer, females will breed only once per year. Otters will become much more vocal during the breeding season with fights among males commonplace. Copulation can occur on land or in the water and is quiet vigorous. Unusually for members of the Mustelid family the male will remain with the female for up to two weeks after a successful courtship. Unlike stoats and pine martens gestation is not delayed with pregnancy lasting just over two months. Otters will give birth to an average of three cubs preferably in summer to maximize their chances of survival. Cubs are fully furred when born and first open their eyes after five weeks. The mother otter will nurse the cubs for up to fifteen weeks by which time they will have become able swimmers. Otter cubs have been known to stay with their mothers for up to one year and can be seen in family parties learning hunting techniques. Mortality rates are low if the cubs are born in the summer and they can expect to live for up to 5 years on average in the wild in Ireland. Current Distribution The Eurasian otter ranges from western Europe east through Asia and on to China and Japan. They are only absent in this area in Iceland and on some of the Mediterranean islands. Otters are believed to have come to Ireland at the end of the last ice age around 10,000 years ago with evidence of their bones being found in Bronze Age sites dated from 4,000 years ago. The species is now present throughout the island of Ireland and can occupy any habitat area which has either a fresh or saltwater source. They have also spread into urban areas with the creation of canals and other artificial water bodies. As they are so elusive it is not known how many individuals there are per square kilometer but best estimates put their numbers at 4 individuals per km2 in good freshwater habitats like those found around midland lakes and at 1 per km2 along the coast. Conservation Issues The Eurasian otter is in decline everywhere in their traditional home ranges except in Ireland where the densest population now exist. Most populations of otters in Europe are listed as being vulnerable, in decline or extinct making the Irish population all the more important. The practice of hunting and trapping is now banned but the destruction of their habitats, human disturbance and falling water quality levels are a threat to the Irish otter population. If cubs are born in winter or early spring mortality rates are high. Man is the main cause of otter death due to increased road traffic and the accidental drownings of coastal otters in lobster pots and fish nets. Dogs also account for a number of otter cub deaths each year. Otters can cause damage to fish hatcheries and farms so adequte fencing is needed in such areas. Competition with increasing American mink numbers for similar food sources may have a detrimental effect on otter numbers in the future. Reflecting its importance the Eurasian otter is a protected species under Irish, EU and international legislation.
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Rock Samphire, Crithmum maritimum
Rock Samphire, Crithmum maritimum
  • Author: nz_willowherb Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-10-05 11:08:52
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°3'40"N - 6°2'19"W
  • (Taken by Gina) Growing on shingle beside the Newcastle Aerodrome. Wicklow
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Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus)
Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2020-01-05 10:20:00
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°5'32"N - 6°2'23"W
  • The Breeches ECNR Kilcoole Co.Wicklow 05-01-2020 Scientific classification Kingdom:Animalia Phylum:Chordata Class:Aves Order:Charadriiformes Family:Scolopacidae Genus:Limnodromus Species:L. scolopaceus Binomial name Limnodromus scolopaceus The Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus) is a medium-sized shorebird. Adults have yellowish legs and a long straight dark bill. The body is dark brown on top and reddish underneath with spotted throat and breast, bars on flanks. The tail has a black and white barred pattern. The winter plumage of both an adult and a juvenile is largely grey. Their breeding habitat is wet tundra in the far north of North America and eastern Siberia. They nest on the ground, usually near water. They migrate to the southern United States and as far south as Central America. Long-billed dowitcher is a rare but regular visitor to western Europe, with some individuals staying for long periods. These birds forage by probing in shallow water or on wet mud. They mainly eat insects, mollusks, crustaceans and marine worms, but also eat some plant material. They are more likely to be seen near fresh water than the short-billed dowitcher. Plump, long-billed shorebird. Breeding adults have salmon-orange underparts with thin black and white bars on neck and sides. Very similar to Short-billed Dowitcher. Upperparts are darker than Short-billed Dowitcher; feathers have darker rufous markings and narrower white tips. Nonbreeding adult plain gray; plumage nearly identical to Short-billed. Juvenile plain brownish-gray, generally duller than Short-billed; upper wing feathers edged with rufous, lacking bright golden markings. Best separated from Short-billed Dowitcher by voice: a sharp "keek" note, sometimes given in a series, unlike lower-pitched "tututu" call of Short-billed. Also taller and more rotund than Short-billed, especially noticeable when in mixed flock. Breeds in Arctic tundra; migrates and winters in a variety of wetland habitats, especially shallow marshy pools. More likely around freshwater than Short-billed, but much overlap.
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IE 29121 - Rosslare Europort - Dundalk - Kilcoole
IE 29121 - Rosslare Europort - Dundalk  - Kilcoole
  • Author: Rene_Potsdam Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-29 07:41:13
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°5'22"N - 6°2'15"W
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" New Morning, Old Days and Sad Ways "
  • Author: " P@tH Im@ges " Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-13 04:59:51
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'23"N - 6°4'19"W
  • Due to the number of smart smarmy comments I have received recently some which I consider to be borderline abusive!, including 2 from people who I would have considered my friends, I have blocked commenting on this photo and will also do likewise on any new photos that I may put up here. I am doing this to see what happens though its highly unlikely that Flickr will change for the better, .I have done this because the only other option is to leave which at this moment in time, I am considering. Im saddened and disgusted by it! Perhaps its considered to be ok to behave in such a crass and rude way these days because of the totally appaling, gerrymandering bullying and unstatesman like behaviour of a certain president in the "Land of the Free" who we are supposed to look up to and be inspired by. Its almost the same story with the the people in power in our nearest neighbours government. It is even sadder when one considers the rule of law and government that was developed my them is so admired and copied all over the World including my own country and now to see such crass behavior is disgusting. There are certain people who admire this disgusing low life carry on and the think it acceptable. As somone who grew up in the 60s I was personally involved in many protest and campaigns here regarding peoples freedoms, religous and the environment, something for which my children and grandkids, who were amazed, admire me greatly for, as naturally, children dont see that in their parents as they think they are the best ever and have done more than us old ones ever did! Wrong!!! Lol! Thats great too and kind of sweet really and I do obviously do look old, harmless and past it to them and probably everybody else these days! Bless them! Dont you believe one word of it!!! I will not accept his disgusting behaviour that I have received, and no one has to! I know what carrying on in such a dreadful way can do to people. Especially young and vulnerable ones on here and the internet elsewhere.. I lost someone very close to me, in my own family because of this, a number of years ago.So the bullys here and everywhere else should really contact his distraught and never to recover broken, Mother and Father and tell them that its ok and it was only fun really at the expense of their only son. They will understand! Sick B`s. Id imprison them and throw away the key Or worse! If any of my good friends here do wish to contact me on messenger, regarding anything they are always more than welcome and I know that they know that already. I will respond of course with dignity and respect to everyone. Many thanks to all you "good ones" out there for your generosity of spirit and your wonderful loyalty and last but not least your amazing and awe inspiring photography that always enriches my own life, and so many others, to such an amazing level . Hugs and best wishes to all of you!. P@t. I took this photo from the old graveyard in Newcastle village. I went there in the dark and set up in the middle of it surrounded by headstones. I did find it very scary as it was totally silent. I had a flashlamp with me but I turned it off as it was making all types of shadows and it looked as though the whole place was coming to life with ghostly figures. I was very pleased, I can tell you, when the dawn started to break out over the east. My Mum used to say " Its the live ones you would want to be afraid of as them dead ghosts wouldnt do you any harm at all! " Irish Mammy logic! Maybe she was right too but somehow Im not totally convinced! Ive written the history of this wonderful tower on one of my othere photos in an album and I include it here on the right for anyone who would like to read it. Its fascinating I think. Heres "The Crypt Kicker Five, Monster Mash. Do Sleep Well, dont forget the garlic and do lock up! www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrQKX3SnIN0 P.
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Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus)
Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-05-06 13:24:30
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'9"N - 6°2'3"W
  • [order] Charadriiformes | [family] Scolopacidae | [latin] Numenius phaeopus | [UK] Whimbrel | [FR] Courlis corlieu | [DE] Regenbrachvogel | [ES] Zarapito Trinador | [IT] Chiurlo piccolo | [NL] Regenwulp spanwidth min.: 78 cm spanwidth max.: 88 cm size min.: 37 cm size max.: 45 cm Breeding incubation min.: 27 days incubation max.: 28 days fledging min.: 35 days fledging max.: 40 days broods 1 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 4 Crotach eanaigh May Curlew, May Whaap, May Fowl, Half Curlew Status: Passage migrant in autumn (August/September) and spring (April/May). Conservation Concern: Green-listed in Ireland. The European population is considered to be Secure. Identification: Similar in appearance to the Curlew, but slightly smaller. Whimbrel has a similar downcurved bill, but this is slightly shorter than that of the Curlew. When seen well, distinctive "striped" head pattern can be discerned - formed by a dark crown, with a pale streak through the centre, a pale supercillium and a dark eyestripe. The call is also one of the best ways of finding a flock of migrating Whimbrels passing overhead. Similar Species: Curlew Call: A rapid, monotone whistle - "whit-tit-tit-tit-tit-tit…", very unlike the call of a Curlew. Frequently heard as birds fly high overhead. Also occasionally a rapid bubbling song, quite similar to Curlew's. Diet: Molluscs, crustaceans & polychaete worms. Breeding: Although there have been a few sightings of birds in suitable habitat, there are no records of Whimbrel breeding in Ireland. Breeds almost continously in Arctic areas from Scandinavia across Siberia to Canada, Greenland and Iceland. Wintering: A few Whimbrel winter in coastal areas, mainly along the south and east coast. The main wintering range extends from southern Spain along the west African coast to southern Africa. Where to See: Mainly coastal sites during spring and autumn migration. Kilcoole in County Wicklow is a reliable site for seeing Whimbrels in spring. Physical characteristics A large, relatively short-legged shorebird with a long down-curved bill, striped head, brown speckled upperparts and light underparts with streaking on the neck and upper breast. The underwings are light. Sexes similar in plumage, but female larger on average. Similar to adult, but back with light spots, crown stripe less distinct, breast more buff, and with finer streaking on neck and chest. Habitat Breeds in various tundra habitat, from wet lowlands to dry heath or wet taiga bogs that have scattered, stunted black spruce. In migration, frequents various coastal and inland habitats, including fields and beaches. Winters in tidal flats and shorelines, occasionally visiting inland habitats. Other details This wader inhabits boreal and arctic regions of Eurasia and North America. The populations of northern Europe, from Finland to the Urals, are wintering in West Africa. They are totalling 200000-400000 breeding pairs, and are increasing Feeding It fattens up during the fall migration at coastal and terrestrial habitats such as heaths and oyster banks. During the winter, it forages in tidal flats, mangroves and a variety of other coastal habitats. This curlew has a broad diet but its main food is marine invertebrates. Crabs are a favorite prey of wintering birds. In the fall, when staging for migration in the Canadian Maritimes and coastal Maine, Whimbrels eat berries and even flowers during breeding season. Berries are pulled off a branch with the tips of the bill. The bird then flips its head back and swallows. Insects are eaten in the same way. Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 100,000-1,000,000 km². It has a large global population estimated to be 1,000,000-2,100,000 individuals (Wetlands International 2002). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Breeds in various tundra habitat, from wet lowlands to dry heath. In migration, frequents various coastal and inland habitats, including fields and beaches. Breeding occurs May through July. Females usually lay four eggs in a depression they scraped out of the ground and lined with leaves. After 22-28 days of incubation, the eggs hatch. Young take about another month to fly. Migration Migratory. West Palearctic population winters mainly in Afrotropical region and on islands and coasts of western Indian Ocean. Very few winter in Europe (irregularly north to Denmark), and only sparingly from North Africa to Persian Gulf. Migrants not scarce in European coastal areas, especially around British Isles, but great majority probably pass overland on broad fronts, overflying large regions between relatively few staging areas. Especially important numbers halt in Hungary and interior of Low Countries (mainly Netherlands) in spring, but rather few in autumn when (so far as known) European passage (chiefly August-September) is without major roosting or feeding concentrations. Many summer in African wintering areas; probably all 1-year-olds do so. Otherwise, spring departure from Afrotropics begins in March, including long Saharan crossings. Early birds reach Europe in late March, though main passage in second half April and first 10 days of May; breeding grounds reoccupied in May, or June in northern Russia.
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Skylark (Alauda arvensis)
Skylark (Alauda arvensis)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-05-06 12:30:28
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'40"N - 6°2'12"W
  • [order] Passeriformes | [family] Alaudidae | [latin] Alauda arvensis | [UK] Sky Lark | [FR] Alouette des champs | [DE] Feldlerche | [ES] Alondra de Eurasia | [IT] Allodola | [NL] Veldleeuwerik Measurements spanwidth min.: 30 cm spanwidth max.: 36 cm size min.: 18 cm size max.: 19 cm Breeding incubation min.: 11 days incubation max.: 13 days fledging min.: 18 days fledging max.: 20 days broods 3 eggs min.: 6 eggs max.:? Physical characteristics It is a small to medium-sized ground dwelling species. Overall it is basically streaky brown above and white below with a gorget of fine streaks. In flight it shows a thin, diffuse off-white trailing edge to the wing and white sides to the tail. The head has a crest but this is often held flat, rendering it invisible. It is unlikely to be seen perched other than on a fence post, preferring to scuttle around on the ground. Its most striking feature is its melodious warbling song during breeding season, delivered for continuous periods of 3 to 15 minutes at a fast pace. The male sometimes sings from a perch, but usually in typical song-flight, climbing steadily higher on fluttering wings until eventually staying in one spot, hovering at 50 to 100m. Habitat Prefers open grassy terrain without any substantive tree cover. Ideal vegetation height for nesting is about 15 to 40cm, with very short or sparse vegetation nearby for feeding. High density habitats are typically sand dunes, marginal uplands and uplands with predominantly unimproved grasslands. Also present in lower densities throughout lowland farmland, occurring in arable crops and a variety of grassland habitats. During winter, large flocks occur in stubble fields, root crops and permanent pastures. Other details Alauda arvensis is a widespread breeder across most of Europe, which accounts for less than half of its global breeding range. Its European breeding population is extremely large (>40,000,000 pairs), but underwent a large decline between 1970-1990. Although declines continued in many western European countries during 1990-2000, key eastern populations remained stable, and the species probably declined only slightly overall. Nevertheless, its population size remains far below the level that preceded its decline. This lark is very common and inhabits a major part of Europe and Asia. It is breeding in all regions of the European Union, where its population amount to 15-20 million breeding pairs (EBCC Atlas of European Breeding Birds). Originally a bird of the steppes or similar open habitats, it has become adapted to cultivation. Since a few decades it undergoes a strong decrease following more general use of pesticides and changing agricultural practices. Feeding The skylark needs abundant insect food during the summer, but is mainly granivorous in winter. Conservation This species has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 10,000,000 km². It has a large global population, including an estimated 79,000,000-160,000,000 individuals in Europe (BirdLife International in prep.). Global population trends have not been quantified, but the species is not believed to approach the thresholds for the population decline criterion of the IUCN Red List (i.e. declining more than 30% in ten years or three generations). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Pairs form in February, leaving large winter flocks to establish territory, generally the same year after year. At this time, males start their flight displays, climbing from the ground in spiral, and singing strongly. Once at high elevation, male descends in spiral, alternating wing beats and glides, always singing. When arrived at some lower elevation, it "falls" to the ground as a stone. On the ground it performs other displays, walking around female with erect crest, dropped wings and fanned tail. Courtship displays reach a peak in March and April, and much more after a strong rain, which remains a riddle. Skylark is territorial during breeding season. The bird performs its displays on the ground, with ruffled feathers, erect crest and some threatening actions such as fluttering off the ground with half open wings, and also with aerial displays such as series of upwards glides with some fluttering towards the intruder. Breeding begins in late April through to July, with two or three clutches of 3 to 5 eggs. The nest is a shallow cup of grasses and sometimes hair, often in a slight depression in the ground, sometimes sheltered by a tuft of grass. Incubation lasts 11 days. Nestlings leave nest at 9 to 10 days, but are not able to fly well until about 20 days. Migration Most of populations are sedentary, but hard winters see the northern populations migrating southwards, joining the residents of these southern areas. If weather is too cold, many die. North populations winter south to north Africa, Canary Islands, Near East and south Asia east to north India and central, south east China. A vagrant from ne Siberia wintered for eight consecutive years in central California.
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Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis)
Meadow  Pipit  (Anthus pratensis)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-05-06 12:14:17
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°5'34"N - 6°2'17"W
  • [group] Wagtails and pipits | [order] PASSERIFORMES | [family] Motacillidae | [latin] Anthus pratensis | [UK] Meadow Pipit | [FR] Pitpit farlouse | [DE] Wiesenpieper | [ES] Bisbita Comun | [NL] Graspieper | [IRL] Riabhóg Mhóna spanwidth min.: 22 cm spanwidth max.: 25 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 16 cm Breeding incubation min.: 11 days incubation max.: 15 days fledging min.: 10 days fledging max.: 15 days broods 2 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 6 Status: One of the commonest bird species in Ireland, favouring rough pastures and uplands. Conservation Concern: Previously Green-listed, though Red-listed in Ireland since 2014, following sharp breeding declines thought to be a result of the unusually severe winters of 2009/10 and 2010/11. Populations have shown signs of significant recovery since. The European population is considered to be Secure. Identification: A very non-descript bird when seen in the field. Meadow Pipits are brown above with black streaking on a white breast and belly. The beak and legs are pinkish. It looks very similar to a Skylark, but that species is slightly larger than a Meadow Pipit and has a broad white stripe above the eye. Rock Pipit is dark grey on the back and has much denser dark streaking on the breast. Similar Species: Skylark and Rock Pipit. Call: A rapid “vist-vist-vist” call is given when alarmed or flushed from cover. Performs a short song flight from a post, which acts as a song. The bird flies straight up, before parachuting back down to the original post. Diet: Feeds on Invertebrates such as craneflies, mayflies and spiders and to a lesser extent on seeds. Breeding: Very widespread breeding species in Ireland, with around 500,000 to 1,000,000 pairs. Found in bogs, uplands and areas of scrub and pasture. Wintering: Generally sedentary, but moves to lowland areas from breeding sites in uplands. Significant numbers of European birds move to Ireland in winter. Where to See: Common throughout Ireland. Physical characteristics The Meadow Pipit looks like a Song Thrush, but is only slightly larger than a Great Tit. The male and female Meadow Pipits are alike. Typically, the upperparts are grey to olive-brown in colour with darker streaks. The underparts are pale grey or buff coloured with bold streaks and spots on the breast and flanks. The belly and outer tail feathers are white. The legs are a dull pink. Juvenile Meadow Pipits are pinkish-buff and lack the dark streaks on the flanks. The Tree Pipit is very similar to the Meadow Pipit, but its general appearance is cleaner with more distinct markings, the legs are a paler pink and the hind claw is much shorter Habitat Breeds in middle, upper middle, and upper latitudes of west Palearctic, from temperate through boreal to fringe of arctic climatic zones, and from continental to oceanic regimes, accepting rainy, windy, and chilly conditions, but avoiding ice and prolonged snow cover as well as torrid and arid areas, within rather narrow temperature range of 10-20 degrees. Eurasian mainland chooses, as a ground-dweller, open areas of rather low fairly complete vegetation cover. Avoids extensive bare rock, stones, sand, soil, and close-cropped grass of herbage, and on the other hand tall dense vegetation, including woods, telegraph wires, stone walls, and other points of vantage. Other details Anthus pratensis is a widespread breeder across much of central and northern Europe, which constitutes >75% of its global breeding range. Its European breeding population is very large (>7,000,000 pairs), and was stable between 1970-1990. Although there were declines in countries such as the United Kingdom, France and Sweden during 1990-2000, the species was stable or increased across most of its European range? including in Norway and Russia?and probably declined only slightly overall. Feeding Diet based on invertebrates, with some plant seeds in autumn and winter. Feeds almost exclusively on ground, walking at steady rate picking invertebrates from leaves and plant stems. Occasionally takes insects in flight which it has disturbed but never flies after them. Conservation This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Onset of laying affected by temperature in last third of March, becoming later with increasing altitude and latitude. April-August in central and western Europe, April-May in Britain, June-July in Swedish Lapland. Nest site is on ground, usually concealed in vegetation. Nest, cup of grasses and other plant material, lined finer vegetation and hair, building by female. Clutch size 3-5 eggs incubated for 11-15 days by female only. Migration Winters from British Isles, continental Europe and s Russia s to n Africa, Near East and Iraq. (Sibley Charles G. 1996)
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Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis)
Meadow  Pipit  (Anthus pratensis)
  • Author: Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2018-05-06 12:14:20
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°5'34"N - 6°2'17"W
  • [group] Wagtails and pipits | [order] PASSERIFORMES | [family] Motacillidae | [latin] Anthus pratensis | [UK] Meadow Pipit | [FR] Pitpit farlouse | [DE] Wiesenpieper | [ES] Bisbita Comun | [NL] Graspieper | [IRL] Riabhóg Mhóna spanwidth min.: 22 cm spanwidth max.: 25 cm size min.: 14 cm size max.: 16 cm Breeding incubation min.: 11 days incubation max.: 15 days fledging min.: 10 days fledging max.: 15 days broods 2 eggs min.: 3 eggs max.: 6 Status: One of the commonest bird species in Ireland, favouring rough pastures and uplands. Conservation Concern: Previously Green-listed, though Red-listed in Ireland since 2014, following sharp breeding declines thought to be a result of the unusually severe winters of 2009/10 and 2010/11. Populations have shown signs of significant recovery since. The European population is considered to be Secure. Identification: A very non-descript bird when seen in the field. Meadow Pipits are brown above with black streaking on a white breast and belly. The beak and legs are pinkish. It looks very similar to a Skylark, but that species is slightly larger than a Meadow Pipit and has a broad white stripe above the eye. Rock Pipit is dark grey on the back and has much denser dark streaking on the breast. Similar Species: Skylark and Rock Pipit. Call: A rapid “vist-vist-vist” call is given when alarmed or flushed from cover. Performs a short song flight from a post, which acts as a song. The bird flies straight up, before parachuting back down to the original post. Diet: Feeds on Invertebrates such as craneflies, mayflies and spiders and to a lesser extent on seeds. Breeding: Very widespread breeding species in Ireland, with around 500,000 to 1,000,000 pairs. Found in bogs, uplands and areas of scrub and pasture. Wintering: Generally sedentary, but moves to lowland areas from breeding sites in uplands. Significant numbers of European birds move to Ireland in winter. Where to See: Common throughout Ireland. Physical characteristics The Meadow Pipit looks like a Song Thrush, but is only slightly larger than a Great Tit. The male and female Meadow Pipits are alike. Typically, the upperparts are grey to olive-brown in colour with darker streaks. The underparts are pale grey or buff coloured with bold streaks and spots on the breast and flanks. The belly and outer tail feathers are white. The legs are a dull pink. Juvenile Meadow Pipits are pinkish-buff and lack the dark streaks on the flanks. The Tree Pipit is very similar to the Meadow Pipit, but its general appearance is cleaner with more distinct markings, the legs are a paler pink and the hind claw is much shorter Habitat Breeds in middle, upper middle, and upper latitudes of west Palearctic, from temperate through boreal to fringe of arctic climatic zones, and from continental to oceanic regimes, accepting rainy, windy, and chilly conditions, but avoiding ice and prolonged snow cover as well as torrid and arid areas, within rather narrow temperature range of 10-20 degrees. Eurasian mainland chooses, as a ground-dweller, open areas of rather low fairly complete vegetation cover. Avoids extensive bare rock, stones, sand, soil, and close-cropped grass of herbage, and on the other hand tall dense vegetation, including woods, telegraph wires, stone walls, and other points of vantage. Other details Anthus pratensis is a widespread breeder across much of central and northern Europe, which constitutes >75% of its global breeding range. Its European breeding population is very large (>7,000,000 pairs), and was stable between 1970-1990. Although there were declines in countries such as the United Kingdom, France and Sweden during 1990-2000, the species was stable or increased across most of its European range? including in Norway and Russia?and probably declined only slightly overall. Feeding Diet based on invertebrates, with some plant seeds in autumn and winter. Feeds almost exclusively on ground, walking at steady rate picking invertebrates from leaves and plant stems. Occasionally takes insects in flight which it has disturbed but never flies after them. Conservation This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern. [conservation status from birdlife.org] Breeding Onset of laying affected by temperature in last third of March, becoming later with increasing altitude and latitude. April-August in central and western Europe, April-May in Britain, June-July in Swedish Lapland. Nest site is on ground, usually concealed in vegetation. Nest, cup of grasses and other plant material, lined finer vegetation and hair, building by female. Clutch size 3-5 eggs incubated for 11-15 days by female only. Migration Winters from British Isles, continental Europe and s Russia s to n Africa, Near East and Iraq. (Sibley Charles G. 1996)
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    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
29121901 Sugarloaf-Newcastle
29121901 Sugarloaf-Newcastle
  • Author: Philip D Ryan Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-29 15:18:27
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'15"N - 6°2'6"W
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    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
29121902 Newcastle-Wicklow Hd
29121902 Newcastle-Wicklow Hd
  • Author: Philip D Ryan Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-29 15:25:41
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'9"N - 6°2'5"W
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    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
25121901 Newcastle
25121901 Newcastle
  • Author: Philip D Ryan Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-25 12:44:27
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'9"N - 6°2'9"W
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    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
25121902 Newcastle
25121902 Newcastle
  • Author: Philip D Ryan Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-25 12:46:03
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 53°4'9"N - 6°2'9"W
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    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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