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How to get to Wakefield (New Zealand) Hotel Wakefield (New Zealand)

Photos of Wakefield, New Zealand

photos found. 212. Photos on the current page: 15
1 
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Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (4)
Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (4)
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 09:35:10
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'9"S - 173°2'21"O
  • This mill was built by Edward Baigent (22 June 1813 – 9 Nov.1892) at Ryversdale, at the entrance to Pigeon Valley, in 1855. It is thought to be the oldest flour mill building still standing in NZ. Baigent settled in the new colony of New Zealand with his wife and five children, after a 151-day journey on the "Clifford". As a sawyer, he had come well-prepared with two pit saws, six circular saws, a circular spindle and files and tools of all kinds. What he needed was good millable timber and this he found at Wakefield. He was soon a major provider of sawn timber in the area, and provided the timber for the first Nelson Cathedral, opened by Bishop Selwyn on Christmas Day 1851. When the New Zealand Company failed in 1844, the settlers fell on hard times. They had no means of converting their corn into meal except by grinding it in a coffee mill, so Edward put his mill to good use, milling timber by day and processing flour at night. Baigent became one of the most successful saw-millers of the region, and his company existed for well over 100 years. He later became a 19th-century Member of Parliament. [www.theprow.org.nz/people/edward-baigent-man-of-many-mill...] [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Baigent]
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (1)
Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (1)
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 09:34:05
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'9"S - 173°2'21"O
  • This mill was built by Edward Baigent (22 June 1813 – 9 Nov.1892) at Ryversdale, at the entrance to Pigeon Valley, in 1855. It is thought to be the oldest flour mill building still standing in NZ. Baigent settled in the new colony of New Zealand with his wife and five children, after a 151-day journey on the "Clifford". As a sawyer, he had come well-prepared with two pit saws, six circular saws, a circular spindle and files and tools of all kinds. What he needed was good millable timber and this he found at Wakefield. He was soon a major provider of sawn timber in the area, and provided the timber for the first Nelson Cathedral, opened by Bishop Selwyn on Christmas Day 1851. When the New Zealand Company failed in 1844, the settlers fell on hard times. They had no means of converting their corn into meal except by grinding it in a coffee mill, so Edward put his mill to good use, milling timber by day and processing flour at night. Baigent became one of the most successful saw-millers of the region, and his company existed for well over 100 years. He later became a 19th-century Member of Parliament. [www.theprow.org.nz/people/edward-baigent-man-of-many-mill...] [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Baigent]
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Wakefield
Churchyard of Saint John's, Wakefield
Churchyard of Saint John's, Wakefield
  • Author: Nick in exsilio Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-19 11:13:12
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'37"S - 173°2'50"O
  • The oldest surviving church in the South Island (1846).
  • License*: Attribution License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Churchyard of Saint John's, Wakefield
Churchyard of Saint John's, Wakefield
  • Author: Nick in exsilio Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-19 11:12:09
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'37"S - 173°2'50"O
  • The oldest surviving church in the South Island (1846).
  • License*: Attribution License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Churchyard of Saint John's, Wakefield
Churchyard of Saint John's, Wakefield
  • Author: Nick in exsilio Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-19 11:08:33
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'36"S - 173°2'51"O
  • The oldest surviving church in the South Island (1846).
  • License*: Attribution License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Saint John's Church, Wakefield
Saint John's Church, Wakefield
  • Author: Nick in exsilio Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-12-19 11:00:05
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'36"S - 173°2'53"O
  • The oldest surviving church in the South Island (1846).
  • License*: Attribution License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (3) - detail
Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (3) - detail
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 09:34:20
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'9"S - 173°2'21"O
  • This mill was built by Edward Baigent (22 June 1813 – 9 Nov.1892) at Ryversdale, at the entrance to Pigeon Valley, in 1855. It is thought to be the oldest flour mill building still standing in NZ. Baigent settled in the new colony of New Zealand with his wife and five children, after a 151-day journey on the "Clifford". As a sawyer, he had come well-prepared with two pit saws, six circular saws, a circular spindle and files and tools of all kinds. What he needed was good millable timber and this he found at Wakefield. He was soon a major provider of sawn timber in the area, and provided the timber for the first Nelson Cathedral, opened by Bishop Selwyn on Christmas Day 1851. When the New Zealand Company failed in 1844, the settlers fell on hard times. They had no means of converting their corn into meal except by grinding it in a coffee mill, so Edward put his mill to good use, milling timber by day and processing flour at night. Baigent became one of the most successful saw-millers of the region, and his company existed for well over 100 years. He later became a 19th-century Member of Parliament. [www.theprow.org.nz/people/edward-baigent-man-of-many-mill...] [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Baigent]
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (2) - detail
Tasman: Ryversdale Mill, Pigeon Valley near Wakefield (c.1855) (2) - detail
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 09:34:38
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'9"S - 173°2'21"O
  • This mill was built by Edward Baigent (22 June 1813 – 9 Nov.1892) at Ryversdale, at the entrance to Pigeon Valley, in 1855. It is thought to be the oldest flour mill building still standing in NZ. Baigent settled in the new colony of New Zealand with his wife and five children, after a 151-day journey on the "Clifford". As a sawyer, he had come well-prepared with two pit saws, six circular saws, a circular spindle and files and tools of all kinds. What he needed was good millable timber and this he found at Wakefield. He was soon a major provider of sawn timber in the area, and provided the timber for the first Nelson Cathedral, opened by Bishop Selwyn on Christmas Day 1851. When the New Zealand Company failed in 1844, the settlers fell on hard times. They had no means of converting their corn into meal except by grinding it in a coffee mill, so Edward put his mill to good use, milling timber by day and processing flour at night. Baigent became one of the most successful saw-millers of the region, and his company existed for well over 100 years. He later became a 19th-century Member of Parliament. [www.theprow.org.nz/people/edward-baigent-man-of-many-mill...] [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Baigent]
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (3) - detail
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (3) - detail
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 08:57:04
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'23"S - 173°2'56"O
  • 62 Pitfure Road, Wakefield, Tasman District It was only a few years after the initial New Zealand Company settlement of Nelson township in 1842, that the village of Pitfure (soon to be renamed Wakefield) was established. However, the distance and relative isolation of the rural community meant that it was not until the late 1860s that this rural centre had grown into a town. Therefore the completion of St Joseph's Church in 1870 is not only historically significant as being reflective of the maturing of the town, but also of the wider Nelson area. Planned European settlement in Nelson began in the early 1840s, but it was not until the arrival of French missionary Father Antoine Marie Garin that the district had a resident Catholic priest. Garin and his curate initiated a building programme, and by the late 1860s it was deemed necessary to build a church in Wakefield. The community spearheaded the construction of St Joseph's with donations toward the building fund, and then throughout its history similar contributions have maintained and extended the building. St Joseph's is a modest-sized timber church that is characteristic of the Gothic Revival-influenced church architecture in NZ. The church, with its loftily gabled and externally buttressed nave, porch, chancel, and vestry, all of which contain lancet windows and access points, has all the component parts of this type of architecture. It carries a Heritage NZ Historic Place Cat.II listing (No.1658).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Still standing
Still standing
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 09:22:19
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°23'50"S - 173°1'51"O
  • Golf Rd., near Richmond, Tasman District
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Not at home (2)
Not at home (2)
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 09:16:28
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°23'1"S - 173°1'30"O
  • Pigeon Valley South Branch Rd., near Richmond, Tasman District
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Not at home (1)
Not at home (1)
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 09:13:09
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°23'1"S - 173°1'30"O
  • Pigeon Valley South Branch Rd., near Richmond, Tasman District
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (3)
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (3)
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 08:58:35
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'16"S - 173°3'5"O
  • 62 Pitfure Road, Wakefield, Tasman District It was only a few years after the initial New Zealand Company settlement of Nelson township in 1842, that the village of Pitfure (soon to be renamed Wakefield) was established. However, the distance and relative isolation of the rural community meant that it was not until the late 1860s that this rural centre had grown into a town. Therefore the completion of St Joseph's Church in 1870 is not only historically significant as being reflective of the maturing of the town, but also of the wider Nelson area. Planned European settlement in Nelson began in the early 1840s, but it was not until the arrival of French missionary Father Antoine Marie Garin that the district had a resident Catholic priest. Garin and his curate initiated a building programme, and by the late 1860s it was deemed necessary to build a church in Wakefield. The community spearheaded the construction of St Joseph's with donations toward the building fund, and then throughout its history similar contributions have maintained and extended the building. St Joseph's is a modest-sized timber church that is characteristic of the Gothic Revival-influenced church architecture in NZ. The church, with its loftily gabled and externally buttressed nave, porch, chancel, and vestry, all of which contain lancet windows and access points, has all the component parts of this type of architecture. It carries a Heritage NZ Historic Place Cat.II listing (No.1658).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (2)
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (2)
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 08:57:04
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'16"S - 173°3'5"O
  • 62 Pitfure Road, Wakefield, Tasman District It was only a few years after the initial New Zealand Company settlement of Nelson township in 1842, that the village of Pitfure (soon to be renamed Wakefield) was established. However, the distance and relative isolation of the rural community meant that it was not until the late 1860s that this rural centre had grown into a town. Therefore the completion of St Joseph's Church in 1870 is not only historically significant as being reflective of the maturing of the town, but also of the wider Nelson area. Planned European settlement in Nelson began in the early 1840s, but it was not until the arrival of French missionary Father Antoine Marie Garin that the district had a resident Catholic priest. Garin and his curate initiated a building programme, and by the late 1860s it was deemed necessary to build a church in Wakefield. The community spearheaded the construction of St Joseph's with donations toward the building fund, and then throughout its history similar contributions have maintained and extended the building. St Joseph's is a modest-sized timber church that is characteristic of the Gothic Revival-influenced church architecture in NZ. The church, with its loftily gabled and externally buttressed nave, porch, chancel, and vestry, all of which contain lancet windows and access points, has all the component parts of this type of architecture. It carries a Heritage NZ Historic Place Cat.II listing (No.1658).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (1)
Wakefield: St Joseph's Catholic Church (c.1870) (1)
  • Author: PhilBee NZ (social historian) Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-03-15 08:55:48
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 41°24'16"S - 173°3'5"O
  • 62 Pitfure Road, Wakefield, Tasman District It was only a few years after the initial New Zealand Company settlement of Nelson township in 1842, that the village of Pitfure (soon to be renamed Wakefield) was established. However, the distance and relative isolation of the rural community meant that it was not until the late 1860s that this rural centre had grown into a town. Therefore the completion of St Joseph's Church in 1870 is not only historically significant as being reflective of the maturing of the town, but also of the wider Nelson area. Planned European settlement in Nelson began in the early 1840s, but it was not until the arrival of French missionary Father Antoine Marie Garin that the district had a resident Catholic priest. Garin and his curate initiated a building programme, and by the late 1860s it was deemed necessary to build a church in Wakefield. The community spearheaded the construction of St Joseph's with donations toward the building fund, and then throughout its history similar contributions have maintained and extended the building. St Joseph's is a modest-sized timber church that is characteristic of the Gothic Revival-influenced church architecture in NZ. The church, with its loftily gabled and externally buttressed nave, porch, chancel, and vestry, all of which contain lancet windows and access points, has all the component parts of this type of architecture. It carries a Heritage NZ Historic Place Cat.II listing (No.1658).
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 212. Photos on the current page: 15
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