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How to get to Graymont - Birmingham (Alabama) Hotel Graymont - Birmingham (Alabama)

Photos of Graymont - Birmingham, Alabama

photos found. 4201. Photos on the current page: 15
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The Rev. Fred Schuttlesworth -- 1992 Statue by John Walter Rhoden (1992) Civil Rights Institute Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4449
The Rev. Fred Schuttlesworth -- 1992 Statue by John Walter Rhoden (1992) Civil Rights Institute Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4449
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 12:05:30
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'55"N - 86°48'47"W
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
The Rev. V5 blur Fred Schuttlesworth -- 1992 Statue by -- Civil Rights Institute Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4449 copy copy
The Rev. V5 blur Fred Schuttlesworth -- 1992 Statue by -- Civil Rights Institute Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4449 copy copy
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 12:05:30
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'55"N - 86°48'47"W
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
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Hotel Graymont - Birmingham
'Place of Revolution and Reconciliation' -- Plaque in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4595
'Place of Revolution and Reconciliation' -- Plaque in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4595
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 13:21:44
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'58"N - 86°48'48"W
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
'The Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth' by John Walter Rhoden (1992) Civil Right Institute Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4451
'The Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth' by John Walter Rhoden (1992) Civil Right Institute Birmingham (AL) February 2019 DSC_4451
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 12:06:29
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'55"N - 86°48'47"W
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Vintage neon sign, Alabama Power
Vintage neon sign, Alabama Power
  • Author: coltera Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-05-04 09:20:17
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'51"N - 86°49'9"W
  • License*: Attribution License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Railroad Park - BBVA Compass Tower - Birmingham, Alabama
Railroad Park - BBVA Compass Tower - Birmingham, Alabama
  • Author: Tony Webster Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2016-06-21 10:42:40
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'35"N - 86°48'37"W
  • A BBVA Tower skyscraper in downtown Birmingham, Alabama, as seen from a trail in Railroad Park, City of Birmingham, Ala.
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
'Three Ministers Kneeling' by Sculptor Raymond Kaskey -- Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
'Three Ministers Kneeling' by Sculptor Raymond Kaskey -- Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 13:20:59
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'58"N - 86°48'48"W
  • Per Bhamwiki: "'Three Ministers Kneeling' is a limestone sculpture by Maryland-based artist Raymond Kaskey, which was erected at Kelly Ingram Park in 1992. Three figures are depicted emerging from a boulder, which serves as a backdrop to the scene. The figures, clad in robes and shown kneeling in prayer, represent Birmingham's ministers of the Civil Rights Movement. Specifically, the sculpture depicts the moment on April 7, 1963 (Palm Sunday) when three ministers, John Thomas Porter, Nelson H. Smith and A. D. King, led a group of 2,000 marchers protesting the jailing of movement leaders Martin Luther King Jr, Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth. When they were confronted by Public Safety Commissioner Bull Connor and his police, the three immediately knelt to pray on the sidewalk. The sculpture was commissioned for the renovated park, transformed into "A Place of Revolution and Reconciliation" to coincide with the opening of the adjacent Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. Birmingham Mayor Richard Arrington intended for the sculpted figures to literally depict the three ministers in prayer, but Shuttlesworth and Abraham Woods Jr objected, saying that it should be made more generic to include the dozens of other ministers who made sacrifices on behalf of the movement. The change allowed Kaskey, who had been working from photographs of the ministers, to hire age-appropriate models for the kneeling figures. He gave Smith and Porter the original plaster versions of their portrait heads. The finished work was carved into a large block of Alabama limestone. A.D. King had died in 1969 while Smith and Porter lived into retirement (both died in 2006). About a year before Smith died his grandson, Anthony Johnson, began campaigning for an explanatory plaque to be added to the sculpture to honor the three men most directly represented. He concluded that "personality differences" were behind the original disagreement and secured the blessings of both Woods and Shuttlesworth for his proposal. The plaque was unveiled on January 9, 2009." DSC_4593
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Statue of 'Three Ministers Kneeling' by Raymond Kaskey (1992) -- Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
Statue of 'Three Ministers Kneeling' by Raymond Kaskey (1992) -- Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 13:20:40
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'58"N - 86°48'48"W
  • Per Bhamwiki: "'Three Ministers Kneeling' is a limestone sculpture by Maryland-based artist Raymond Kaskey, which was erected at Kelly Ingram Park in 1992. Three figures are depicted emerging from a boulder which serves as a backdrop to the scene. The figures, clad in robes and shown kneeling in prayer, represent Birmingham's ministers of the Civil Rights Movement. Specifically, the sculpture depicts the moment on April 7, 1963 (Palm Sunday) when three ministers, John Thomas Porter, Nelson H. Smith and A. D. King, led a group of 2,000 marchers protesting the jailing of movement leaders Martin Luther King Jr, Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth. When they were confronted by Public Safety Commissioner Bull Connor and his police, the three immediately knelt to pray on the sidewalk. The sculpture was commissioned for the renovated park, transformed into "A Place of Revolution and Reconciliation" to coincide with the opening of the adjacent Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. Birmingham Mayor Richard Arrington intended for the sculpted figures to literally depict the three ministers in prayer, but Shuttlesworth and Abraham Woods Jr objected, saying that it should be made more generic to include the dozens of other ministers who made sacrifices on behalf of the movement. The change allowed Kaskey, who had been working from photographs of the ministers, to hire age-appropriate models for the kneeling figures. He gave Smith and Porter the original plaster versions of their portrait heads. The finished work was carved into a large block of Alabama limestone. A.D. King had died in 1969 while Smith and Porter lived into retirement (both died in 2006). About a year before Smith died his grandson, Anthony Johnson, began campaigning for an explanatory plaque to be added to the sculpture to honor the three men most directly represented. He concluded that "personality differences" were behind the original disagreement and secured the blessings of both Woods and Shuttlesworth for his proposal. The plaque was unveiled on January 9, 2009." DSC_4591
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Birmingham Civil Rights Institute
Birmingham Civil Rights Institute
  • Author: leewrogers Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-06-08 14:15:17
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'57"N - 86°48'51"W
  • License*: All Rights Reserved - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bull Connor's Water Cannons -- Statue in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
Bull Connor's Water Cannons -- Statue in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 13:30:44
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'58"N - 86°48'48"W
  • 'Bull' Connor (1897-1973) was an ardent segregationist who served for 22 years as commissioner of public safety in Birmingham (AL). Connor used his administrative authority over the police and fire departments to ensure that Birmingham remained, as Martin Luther King Jr described it, “the most segregated city in America”. In 1963 the violent response of Connor and his police force to demonstrations during the Birmingham Campaign propelled the civil rights movement into the national spotlight. During the first days of the 1963 campaign, Connor avoided violent confrontations between police and protesters. Adopting a strategy that had successfully thwarted demonstrations in Albany (GA), Birmingham police jailed wave after wave of protesters without abuse. On May 2,1963, when campaign leaders called on young students to sustain the protest, police arrested more than 900 “Children’s Crusade” participants. On May 3rd, however, Connor ordered firemen to use their hoses on protesters and onlookers, and as the demonstrators fled from the force of the hoses, Connor directed officers to pursue them with dogs. During the following days, television reports and newspapers across the country showed images of police and firemen using hoses, dogs, and batons to force demonstrators from downtown Birmingham. National outrage forced the John F. Kennedy’s administration to send a negotiator, Burke Marshall, to Birmingham. The Birmingham Campaign ended on May 10th when an agreement was reached between black leaders and representatives of Birmingham’s business community that moved the city toward desegregation. On May 23, 1963, the Alabama Supreme Court ordered Connor and the other city commissioners to vacate their offices. Within a year, Connor won election to the Alabama Public Service Commission, where he served as president until 1972. Source: The King Institute DSC_4614
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bull Connor's 'Water Cannons' -- Interpretive Sign in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
Bull Connor's 'Water Cannons' -- Interpretive Sign in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 13:29:02
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'58"N - 86°48'48"W
  • 'Bull' Connor (1897-1973) was an ardent segregationist who served for 22 years as commissioner of public safety in Birmingham (AL). Connor used his administrative authority over the police and fire departments to ensure that Birmingham remained, as Martin Luther King Jr described it, “the most segregated city in America”. In 1963 the violent response of Connor and his police force to demonstrations during the Birmingham Campaign propelled the civil rights movement into the national spotlight. During the first days of the 1963 campaign, Connor avoided violent confrontations between police and protesters. Adopting a strategy that had successfully thwarted demonstrations in Albany (GA), Birmingham police jailed wave after wave of protesters without abuse. On May 2,1963, when campaign leaders called on young students to sustain the protest, police arrested more than 900 “Children’s Crusade” participants. On May 3rd, however, Connor ordered firemen to use their hoses on protesters and onlookers, and as the demonstrators fled from the force of the hoses, Connor directed officers to pursue them with dogs. During the following days, television reports and newspapers across the country showed images of police and firemen using hoses, dogs, and batons to force demonstrators from downtown Birmingham. National outrage forced the John F. Kennedy’s administration to send a negotiator, Burke Marshall, to Birmingham. The Birmingham Campaign ended on May 10th when an agreement was reached between black leaders and representatives of Birmingham’s business community that moved the city toward desegregation. On May 23, 1963, the Alabama Supreme Court ordered Connor and the other city commissioners to vacate their offices. Within a year, Connor won election to the Alabama Public Service Commission, where he served as president until 1972. Source: The King Institute DSC_4607
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bull Connor's Water Cannons -- Statue in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
Bull Connor's Water Cannons -- Statue in Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 13:29:40
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'58"N - 86°48'48"W
  • 'Bull' Connor (1897-1973) was an ardent segregationist who served for 22 years as commissioner of public safety in Birmingham (AL). Connor used his administrative authority over the police and fire departments to ensure that Birmingham remained, as Martin Luther King Jr described it, “the most segregated city in America”. In 1963 the violent response of Connor and his police force to demonstrations during the Birmingham Campaign propelled the civil rights movement into the national spotlight. During the first days of the 1963 campaign, Connor avoided violent confrontations between police and protesters. Adopting a strategy that had successfully thwarted demonstrations in Albany (GA), Birmingham police jailed wave after wave of protesters without abuse. On May 2,1963, when campaign leaders called on young students to sustain the protest, police arrested more than 900 “Children’s Crusade” participants. On May 3rd, however, Connor ordered firemen to use their hoses on protesters and onlookers, and as the demonstrators fled from the force of the hoses, Connor directed officers to pursue them with dogs. During the following days, television reports and newspapers across the country showed images of police and firemen using hoses, dogs, and batons to force demonstrators from downtown Birmingham. National outrage forced the John F. Kennedy’s administration to send a negotiator, Burke Marshall, to Birmingham. The Birmingham Campaign ended on May 10th when an agreement was reached between black leaders and representatives of Birmingham’s business community that moved the city toward desegregation. On May 23, 1963, the Alabama Supreme Court ordered Connor and the other city commissioners to vacate their offices. Within a year, Connor won election to the Alabama Public Service Commission, where he served as president until 1972. Source: The King Institute DSC_4609
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Bull Connor's Water Cannons -- Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
Bull Connor's Water Cannons -- Kelly Ingram Park Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 13:30:11
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°30'58"N - 86°48'48"W
  • 'Bull' Connor (1897-1973) was an ardent segregationist who served for 22 years as commissioner of public safety in Birmingham (AL). Connor used his administrative authority over the police and fire departments to ensure that Birmingham remained, as Martin Luther King Jr described it, “the most segregated city in America”. In 1963 the violent response of Connor and his police force to demonstrations during the Birmingham Campaign propelled the civil rights movement into the national spotlight. During the first days of the 1963 campaign, Connor avoided violent confrontations between police and protesters. Adopting a strategy that had successfully thwarted demonstrations in Albany (GA), Birmingham police jailed wave after wave of protesters without abuse. On May 2,1963, when campaign leaders called on young students to sustain the protest, police arrested more than 900 “Children’s Crusade” participants. On May 3rd, however, Connor ordered firemen to use their hoses on protesters and onlookers, and as the demonstrators fled from the force of the hoses, Connor directed officers to pursue them with dogs. During the following days, television reports and newspapers across the country showed images of police and firemen using hoses, dogs, and batons to force demonstrators from downtown Birmingham. National outrage forced the John F. Kennedy’s administration to send a negotiator, Burke Marshall, to Birmingham. The Birmingham Campaign ended on May 10th when an agreement was reached between black leaders and representatives of Birmingham’s business community that moved the city toward desegregation. On May 23, 1963, the Alabama Supreme Court ordered Connor and the other city commissioners to vacate their offices. Within a year, Connor won election to the Alabama Public Service Commission, where he served as president until 1972. Source: The King Institute DSC_4611
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
16th Street Baptist Church Birmingham (AL) February 2019
16th Street Baptist Church Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-28 14:41:37
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°31'0"N - 86°48'53"W
  • DSC_5227
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
Memorial Stained Glass Window -- 16th Street Baptist Church Birmingham (AL) February 2019
Memorial Stained Glass Window -- 16th Street Baptist Church Birmingham (AL) February 2019
  • Author: Ron Cogswell Follow on flickr foto flickr
  • Date of photography: 2019-02-26 12:51:51
  • Geographical coordinates of the taken: 33°31'0"N - 86°48'53"W
  • Per the Church's Visitor Guide: "The tragedy of Sunday September 15, 1963, produced outpourings of sympathy, concern, and financial contributions from all parts of the world. The restored Church was re-opened on Sunday June 7, 1964. A special memorial gift (a large stained glass window of the image of a black crucified Christ designed by John Petts), was given by the people of Wales in June 1965. The window is located in the rear center of the Church at the balcony level, and seeks to express the identification of Christ and Everyman. In the face of the huge world problem of intolerance, denial of human rights, hatred, violence of man against man, color-bars, and segregation, the simple words of Christ stand out in the window: 'YOU DO IT TO ME...!'" DSC_4523 V2
  • License*: Attribution-NonCommercial License - photo in flikr foto flickr
    *The photographs are copyrighted by their respective owners.
photos found. 4201. Photos on the current page: 15
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